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Unprecedented Recognition for Counseling Psychology

FellowshipBrittan L. Davis was selected from a highly competitive group of nominees to receive the prestigious Donald E. Super Fellowship Award from the American Psychological Association Division 17: Society of Counseling Psychology.  Davis was awarded the fellowship for her dissertation on the relationship between sexuality-based workplace discrimination (heterosexism and microaggressions) and various work-life outcomes (work-life interference, and job and life satisfaction). Davis shared, “I have been very interested in work-life experiences and the various ways in which meaning is constructed across diverse social identity groups. This melding of knowledge and training has allowed me to identify the absence of sexual minorities within work-life scholarship as a major gap in vocational psychology research.” Davis, a self-described feminist multicultural and relational-cultural researcher and practitioner, is now nationally recognized as a significant contributor to the field of counseling psychology through the receipt of the Donald E. Super Fellowship Award.

“My dissertation chair, Dr. Donna Schultheiss, also deserves much recognition for my receipt of this award, as she is one of the few faculty in the nation to have had two students receive this award,” noted Davis. Basak Kacar Khamush of Cleveland State University earned the 2015 Donald E. Super Award and Fellowship. While training under CSU’s noted scholars in counseling and vocational psychology, Davis attributes her success to support and guidance of her dissertation committee, Drs. Graham Stead, Julia Phillips, Justin Perry, and Michael Horvath, all of whom contributed to her research program and professional development as a counseling psychologist.

Fellowship awards recognize and support outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based degrees. The Society of Counseling Psychology, Division 17 of the American Psychological Association announced the fellowship award, along with a cash award, at the 2016 APA Convention held August 4-7 in Denver, Colorado.

Donald E. Super Fellowship is awarded to support dissertation research on a topic related to career development and is accompanied by a cash award. It is awarded annually by the Society of Counseling Psychology, a Division of the American Psychological Association. http://www.div17.org/about-scp/awards/scp-awards/#DonaldSuper

 

After having spent the majority of my graduate training nurturing my vocational psychology line of research, receiving the Donald E. Super Fellowship Award for my dissertation on the work-life interface of LGBQ workplace discrimination and microaggressions is truly an honor. As a cornerstone of counseling psychology, career development and counseling has been incredibly influential in my own professional development and identity. The work of Donald E. Super has served as an important basis for my theoretical, practical, and lived understanding of work.

My graduate training in the Counseling Psychology Program at Cleveland State University has supported a strong vocational psychology theoretical basis in both breadth and depth. Having faculty who are noted scholars in both vocational psychology and multicultural issues, I have been able to weave together my primary lines of research. As I am committed to the theory and praxis of social justice, I have been very interested in the work-life experiences and the various ways in which meaning in constructed across diverse social identity groups. This melding of knowledge and training has allowed me to identify the absence of sexual minorities within work-life scholarship as a major gap in vocational psychology research.

Brittan L. Davis