Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences

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Biology Graduate Courses: BIO 500-899

  • Courses numbered 500-600 are for students seeking the M.S. degree.
  • Courses numbered 700-800 are for students seeking the Ph.D. degree who already have an M.S. degree or equivalent credit hours. Students enrolled in 700-800 courses are expected to make more substantial contributions to papers, presentations, projects, etc., and will be graded more stringently than students in 500-600 versions.
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
(LECTURE-LAB-TOTAL)
BIO 500 / 700 Graduate Orientation 1 - 0 - 1 F
BIO 502 / 702 Graduate Orientation 1 - 0 - 1 S
BIO 504 / 704 Biological Chemistry 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 508 Animal Cell Culture 2 - 2 - 3
BIO 510 / 710 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 511 / 711 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 512 / 712 Immunology 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 513 / 713 Immunology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 F
BIO 514 / 714 Parasitology 2 - 0 - 2 S
BIO 515 / 715 Parasitology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 516 / 716 Microbiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 517 / 717 Microbiology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 518 / 718 Histology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 519 / 719 Histology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 520 Explorations in Biology: Inquiry-Based Investigations of Urban Ecosystems 1 - 2 - 2
BIO 522 / 722 Mammalian Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 523 / 723 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 526 / 726 Neurobiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 527 / 727 Neurobiology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 528 / 728 Endocrinology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 530 / 730 Bioinformatics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 534 / 734 Elements of Pharmacology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 535 / 735 Techniques in Molecular Biology 1 - 6 - 4
BIO 536 / 736 Evolutionary Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 538 / 738 Clinical Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 540 / 740 Biostatistics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 542 / 742 Morphometrics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 548 Biogeography 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 550 / 750 Evolutionary Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 552 Urban Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 554 / 754 Ecology 3 - 4 - 5
BIO 555 / 755 Ecology Laboratory 0 - 3 - 1
BIO 558 / 758 Behavior 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 562 / 762 Evolutionary Ecology of Sexual Reproduction 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 564 / 764 Developmental Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 565 / 765 Developmental Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 570 / 770 Protozoology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 571 / 771 Protozoology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 572/772 Wetland Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 574/774 Stream Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 576 / 776 Plant Biochemistry 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 577 / 777 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 578 / 778 Morphology of Flowering Plants 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 579 / 779 Morphology of Flowering Plants Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 580 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers 3 - 4 - 5
BIO 584 / 784 Writing and Editing Grant Proposals 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 585/785 Practical Grant Writing 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 588 Museum Studies in Natural History 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 593 Special Topics in Biology, with Lab variable 1-5
BIO 594 Special Topics in Biology variable 1-6
BIO 595 Environmental Seminar 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 596 Independent Study in Biology variable 1-6
BIO 597 Independent Research in Biology variable 1-6
BIO 602 / 802 Enzymology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 604 / 804 Cell Biology 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 608 /808 Pharmacodynamics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 610 / 810 Molecular Biology and Genetics 3 - 0 - 3 S
BIO 612 / 812 Microbial Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 616 / 816 Proliferative Signal Transduction 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 622 / 822 Advanced Vertebrate Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 624 / 824 Foundations of Biomedical Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 630 / 830 Recombinant DNA Techniques 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 632 / 832 Population Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 634 / 834 Developmental Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 638 / 838 Advances in Cell Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 640 / 840 Molecular Evolutionary Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 651 / 851 Advanced Research in Field Biology 0 - 6 - 3
BIO 653 / 853 Advanced Research in Field Biology 0 - 8 - 4
BIO 656 / 856 Environmental Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 670 / 870 Advances in Biology 2 - 0 - 2
BIO 672 / 872 Advances in Molecular Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 674 / 874 Advances in Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 676 / 876 Advances in Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 678 / 878 Advances in Evolution 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 684 / 884 Research Seminar 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 688 Graduate Seminar (M.S.) 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 690 Qualifying Examination (M.S.) 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 691 M.S. Research variable: 1 to10
BIO 693 Graduate Project (M.S.) 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 694 Graduate Project (M.S.) 0 - 6 - 3
BIO 695 M.S. Thesis Research variable: 1 to10
BIO 888 Ph.D. Seminar 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 891 Ph.D. Research variable: 1 to10
BIO 895 Ph.D. Dissertation Research variable: 1 to10

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Environmental Graduate Courses: EVS 506-695

COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDIT HOURS
(LECTURE-LAB-TOTAL)
EVS 506 Ecosystem Science 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 510 Environmental Geology for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 512 Geological History of the Cleveland Area for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 514 Ecosystem Science for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 520 Rivers and Watersheds of Northeast Ohio 2 - 0 - 2
EVS 521 Rivers and Watersheds Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
EVS 523 Map Interpretation and the Visualization of Space 1 - 4 - 3
EVS 525 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing 2 - 4 - 4
EVS 527 Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing and GIS 1 - 6 - 4
EVS 550 Applied Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 560 Geomorphology 3 - 2 - 4
EVS 570 Aquatic Ecosystems 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 571 Aquatic Ecosystems laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
EVS 580 Earth System Science for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 581 OhioView Prerequsite Remote Sensing  
EVS 582 OhioView Introduction Remote Sensing  
EVS 585 OhioView Advanced Remote Sensing  
EVS 588 OhioView Research in Remote Sensing  
EVS 593 Special Topics in Environmental Science, with Lab variable 1-5
EVS 594 Topics in Environmental Science variable 1-6
EVS 596 Independent Study in Environmental Science variable 1-6
EVS 597 Independent Research in Environmental Science variable 1-6
EVS 680 Issues in Environmental Science 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 690 Non-Thesis M.S. Exit Project 1 - 0 - 1
EVS 691 M.S. Research in Environmental Science variable: 1 to 12
EVS 695 M.S. Thesis Research in Environmental Science variable: 1 to12

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Course Descriptions:

BIO 500/700 Graduate Orientation (1-0-1). Topics include rules and regulations, research opportunities, scientific writing, and scientific ethics. All students must complete this orientation course before graduation.

BIO 502/702 Graduate Orientation (1-0-1). Topics include radiation safety, animal care and handling, and scientific ethics. All students except those in the non-thesis option must complete both orientation courses before graduation.

BIO 504/704 Biological Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 306 or equivalent. Metabolic reactions of the cell for energy production and storage. Structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Regulation and control of metabolic pathways. Structure, function, and transport mechanism of biological membranes. The biochemistry of nitrogen-containing molecules. Emphasis on the chemical control and regulation.

BIO 506/706 Computer Applications in Biology (3-0-3). - to be deleted(Graded S, F, I) Uses of computer methods in the biological sciences. Emphasis will be placed on computer applications in the UNIX environment, including programming languages, statistical analysis software, electronic communication and text processing tools. An applications-oriented final project is required, as well as regular, interactive computer exercises.

BIO 508 Animal Cell Culture (2-2-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Theoretical and practical indroduction to methods of animal cell culture necessary for research in biomedical or biotech labs and in the pharmaceutical industry. Techniques will include choice of medium, passaging, freezing, test of purity and viability, stable and transient transduction, and preparing primary cultures.

BIO 510/710 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy (3-0-3). - to be deletedPrerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 511/711. Consideration in depth of principles and diverse modes of light microscopy which are of major importance in biological research and of aspects of microtechnique. Course includes lectures, demonstrations, and student projects to be undertaken outside scheduled class time.

BIO 511/711 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy Laboratory (0-2-1). - to be deletedPrerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 510/710.Projects designed to illustrate the principles covered in BIO 510/710.

BIO 512/712 Immunology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 308, BIO 412, and BIO 504. Corequisite: BIO 513/713. The study of immune cell development, organization and expression of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes, including antigen processing and presentation, cytokine regulation, apoptosis, immunity to infections, diseases, and vaccines.

BIO 513/713 Immunology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 512/712. The laboratory covers antibody production, general immunoassays, tissue culture techniques, and genetic engineering techniques.

BIO 514/714 Parasitology (2-0-2). Prerequisite: BIO 302 or equivalent. Corequisite: BIO 515/715. A basic course primarily designed for biology majors who desire an understanding of animal parasitology, including ecology, life histories, host-parasite relationships.

BIO 515/715 Parasitology Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 514/714. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 514/714.

BIO 516/716 Microbiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 517/717. Structure, function, and genetics of major groups of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria; the role of microbes in the economy of nature and man.

BIO 517/717 Microbiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 516/716. Laboratory methods for isolation, examination, manipulation, and experimentation with protozoa.

BIO 518/718 Histology (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 519/719. Structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs with emphasis on relations of structure and function.

BIO 519/719 Histology Laboratory(0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 518/718. Laboratory investigations of the structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs.

BIO 520 Explorations in Biology: Inquiry-Based Investigations of Urban Ecosystems (1-2-2). A week-long introduction to the ecology of human-dominated ecosystems. Lectures and laboratories consider biodiversity, human impacts on ecosystems and vice versa, and ecological monitoring programs and their integration into school curricula. Intended for upper elementary, middle, and high school teachers. Held at the Woodlake Environmental Field Station, Peninsula, Ohio.

BIO 522/722 Mammalian Physiology (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 523/723. Physiology of major organ systems of vertebrates, with an emphasis on mammalian physiology.

BIO 523/723 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 522/722. Exercises that emphasize modern methods of physiological measurement, and the analysis and presentation of physiological data.

BIO 526/726 Neurobiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 301 or equivalent. Exploration of the relation of behavior to neural function; topics include basic neurophysiology and properties of sensory and motor systems illustrated with human and non-human examples.

BIO 527/727 Neurobiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 526/726, or equivalent and permission of instructor. Classical invertebrate experiments that provide an introduction to standard neurobiological techniques for studying neural activity, including simple dissection, stimulating and recording neural activity, and analyzing data.

BIO 528/728 Endocrinology (3-0-3). Introduction to functions of hormones and endocrine glands, including mechanisms controlling hormone secretion; mammalian systems emphasized.

BIO 530/730 Bioinformatics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 306 and BIO 310, or equivalents, or permission of instructor. A course in either statistics or computer science is highly recommended. Introduction to the tools and techniques of bioinformatics, with emphasis on computational techniques to analyze genomic and proteomic data. Topics include searching of databases, sequence alignment and analysis, phylogenetic methods and computer programming to analyze database information. A project using original or internet bioinformatics tools is required.

BIO 534/734 Elements of Pharmacology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 306, and BIO 422 or BIO 424, or permission of instructor. An analysis of the basic principles of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of selected therapeutic agents. Emphasis will be on the experimental basis of drug discovery, design, and clinical use.

BIO 535/735 Techniques in Molecular Biology (1-6-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of modern biotechnology with emphasis on the techniques and procedures of molecular biology. Students will work together to complete a project.

BIO 536/736 Evolutionary Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to the modern theory of evolutionary genetics, including development of the concepts of genetic diversity, natural selection, random genetic drift, population substructure, infinite-alleles models, and the neutral theory of molecular evolution.

BIO 538/738 Clinical Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Good standing the the Physician Assistant Program or Permission of instructor. Principles of clinical genetics and the use of traditional and molecular methods for the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of genetic disorders.

BIO 540/740 Biostatistics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Introductory course in biostatistics, which will include probability, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, regression, and other analytical statistical methods applicable to biology.

BIO 542/742 Morphometrics (3-0-3)Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Application of mathematical and statistical methodology to problems of biological structure and functional form. Individual projects will involve detailed morphometric analyses of real data.

BIO 548 Biogeography (3-0-3)Prerequisite: BIO 300, 302, or 304, or equivalent. Topics reflect the study of the distribution, ranges and limits of animals and plants and the interaction of physical and biotic systems to explain patterns of diversity and change across time at population, community and ecosystem levels.

BIO 550/750 Evolutionary Biology (3-0-3)Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to the modern theory of evolution.

BIO 752 Marine Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 301, BIO 304, or equivalents. An advanced ecology course that encompasses marine biology, ecological adaptations of organisms to the marine environment, and interspecific interactions. This course will cover marine habitats and the specializations of organisms that live in them.

BIO 552 Urban Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 202 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Effects of human actions on ecological processes and ecosystem services in urban environments. Topics include concepts and frameworks related to urban ecology; how urban and urbanizing regions modify the natural environment; the cross-disciplinary nature of urban ecology; and the challenges to designing ecologically sound and sustainable urban areas.

BIO 554/754 Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 304 or equivalent. Study of interactions of organisms with their environment, including growth and regulation of populations, communities, energetics of organisms and ecosystems, life-history evolution, and systems ecology.

BIO 555/755 Ecology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: BIO 304 or equivalent. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 554/754 and to provide field experience in ecology. The laboratory includes a few one-day field trips on weekends.

BIO 558/758 Behavior (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to and survey of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective.

BIO 562/762 Evolutionary Ecology of Sexual Reproduction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300, or BIO 302, or permission of instructor. Although organisms spend huge amounts of energy in carrying out activities related to sexual reproduction, it is by far the most dominate mode of reproduction, but why? This course will attempt to explore that question and to examine various modes of sexual reproduction in diverse organisms in an evolutionary context.

BIO 564/764 Developmental Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: A course in embryology or developmental biology. An experimental analysis of the mechanisms of development with emphasis on events at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization.

BIO 565/765 Developmental Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: A course in embryology or developmental biology. Corequisite: BIO 564/764. Laboratory involving experimental analyses of the mechanisms of development.

BIO 570/770 Protozoology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 571/771. Classification, morphology, and physiology of protozoa.

BIO 571/771 Protozoology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 570/770. Laboratory methods for isolation, examination, manipulation, and experimentation with protozoa.

BIO 572/772 Wetland Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisites: BIO 300 and BIO 304. A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components of wetland ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in wetland ecosystems and community interactions are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and analyses used in wetland ecology. Techniques in wetland characterization and delineation are covered.

BIO 574/774 Stream Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 302 or 304 or equivalent. A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components in stream ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in aquatic environments, community interactions, and ecosystem energetics are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and stream ecosystem analyses. Techniques in stream habitat and water quality assessment are covered. To facilitate outdoor excursions, may be scheduled outside normal semester dates and graded initially with a T grade.

BIO 576/776 Plant Biochemistry (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 577/777. Basic physiological processes in plants; photosynthesis, uptake of nutrients, respiration, growth, and the role of hormones and enzymes involved in these processes.

BIO 577/777 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 576/776. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 576/776.

BIO 578/778 Morphology of Flowering Plants (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Any botany course for biology majors, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 579/779. Study of the overall form, development, and to a minor extent the microscopic structure of the vegetative and reproductive structure of flowering plants (angiosperms).

BIO 579/779 Morphology of Flowering Plants Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 578/778. Laboratory study of the overall form, development, and to a minor extent the microscopic structure of the vegetative and reproductive structure of flowering plants (angiosperms).

BIO 580 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5). Enrollment is restricted to in-service middle school teachers without science specialty and students enrolled in the M. Ed. Middle School Science program. No credit towards completion of a graduate degree in biology. Biological concepts relevant to teaching middle-school-level biology will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.

BIO 584/784 Writing and Editing Grant Proposals (1-0-1). This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of preparing grant proposals to private, state and federal agencies. Key topics covered will be: formulating specific experimental aims, experimental design, critiques and re-submission.

BIO 585/785 Practical Grant Writing (3-0-3). An introduction to the fundamentals of preparing grant proposals to private, state and federal agencies, with some focus on those supporting biomedical research. Students will write and revise a major grant proposal.

BIO 588 Museum Studies in Natural History (3-0-3). Prerequisite: ART 505 and permission of instructor.Introduction to museums with particular attention to all aspects of science museums, including education, preservation of collections, research, display for study and enrichment, living collections, interactive displays, and nature preserves. Field trips may occur outside scheduled class hours.

BIO 593 Special Topics in Biology, with Lab (1 to 5 credits). Prerequisite: at least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in biology. Includes lab or excursions or other practical exercises. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

BIO 594 Special Topics in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A lecture course on a special topic.

BIO 595 Environmental Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A seminar course for students seeking a M.S. in Environmental Science.

BIO 596/796 Independent Study in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Specialized study of a particular topic in biology.

BIO 597 Independent Research in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of BGES Graduate Program Director. Special research project or independent study course with lab, field work, or other experimental component. Not for thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Students should make arrangements with an instructor concerning topic, format, and grade criteria before registering for this course.

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BIO 602/802 Enzymology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 504 or equivalent. General consideration of enzyme nomenclature, purification, assay, introductory kinetics and mechanisms, cofactors, active sites, subunit structure, allosteric and regulatory properties, and the control of multienzyme systems.

BIO 604/804 Cell Biology (3-0-3). Examination of basic cellular processes including structure and function of organelles and biomembranes, intracellular transport, cell motility and shape, and cellular signaling events as they relate to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and the integration of cells into tissues. Heavy reliance will be made on the experimental basis for our understanding of these phenomena, with extensive use of the primary literature.

BIO 608/808 Pharmacodynamics (3-0-3). - to be deletedPrerequisites: Courses in biochemistry and physiology, or equivalent. Principles of the interaction between drugs and tissues.

BIO 610/810 Molecular Biology and Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 504/704 or equivalent. Structure and function of nucleic acids. Replication, modification, and recombination of DNA. Transcription, translation, and regulation of transcription and translation.

BIO 612/812 Microbial Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 416 and BIO 506, or equivalents. Microbial growth and reproduction considered at the molecular level; discussions of structure, growth kinetics, synthesis of DNA, RNA, and protein, regulation of metabolism, and other biological molecules; physiology; metabolic pathways of bacteria, fungi, and protozoans.

BIO 616/816 Proliferative Signal Transduction (3-0-3). - to be deletedPrerequisite: BIO 506. A general overview of the cell cycle and consideration of factors involved in proliferative signal transduction at the cell surface.

BIO 622/822 Advanced Vertebrate Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A general overview of the cell cycle and consideration of factors involved in proliferative signal transduction at the cell surface.

BIO 624/824 Foundations of Biomedical Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BME doctoral student status or permission of instructor. A graduate-level introduction providing a foundation for applied and basic research in human and mammalian physiology, including basic information and current active research.

BIO 630/830 Recombinant DNA Techniques (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 506. Lecture course on recombinant DNA techniques. Theoretical background and practical application of plasmids, restriction and modifying enzymes, lambda phage and vectors. The use of genomic and cDNA libraries and a variety of detection systems to isolate and characterize cloned DNA, including hybridization techniques and DNA sequence analysis, will be discussed.

BIO 632/832 Population Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Theoretical analysis of the mechanisms and consequences of allele frequency changes in populations of organisms.

BIO 634/834 Developmental Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 504. A molecular genetics course. Genetics of development in single and multicellular systems, with emphasis on programmed and differential gene expression.

BIO 638/838 Advances in Cell Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in cell biology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 640/840 Molecular Evolutionary Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Theoretical and practical analyses of genomic evolution at the molecular level. Individual projects will involve quantitative studies of nucleotide and protein sequences.

BIO 651/851 Advanced Research in Field Biology (0-6-3). Prerequisites: Previous course work in ecology, evolution, behavior, or conservation biology or permission of the instructor. This course will examine field techniques for the analysis of biodiversity and ecological relationships through participation in field research projects. Study sites are in remote, primitive locations and may involve international travel. See instructor for location, costs, and preparations necessary for the course.

BIO 653/853 Advanced Research in Field Biology (0-8-4). Four-credit version of BIO 652/852.

BIO 656/856 Environmental Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 424 or equivalent. Physiological adaptations to environmental problems; major environmental variables considered: food and energy, light, temperature, oxygen, water, and salinity; adaptations to the daily and seasonal changes in the environment.

BIO 670/870 Advances in Biology (2-0-2). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in modern biology. Through lectures, discussion, and readings of the primary literature, students will explore information at the "cutting edge" of the field. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 672/872 Advances in Molecular Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in molecular biology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 674/874 Advances in Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in Ecology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 676/876 Advances in Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in physiology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 678/878 Advances in Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in evolution. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 684/884 Research Seminar (1-0-1). Weekly topics vary with instructor and guest speakers. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 688 Graduate Seminar (M.S.) (1-0-1). Topic varies with instructor. May be repeated for credit. Offered every term.

BIO 690 Non-Thesis M.S. Exit Project (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. The exit literature research project for completion of the non-thesis Masters degree in biology: an in-depth written review of the literature on a selected topic in biology, and its oral defense. May not be repeated for credit.

BIO 691 M.S. Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate program director. Research for students entering the program, before submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

BIO 693 Graduate Project (M.S.) (0-4-2). (Graded S, F, I) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate committee and supervisory professor. An independent research project terminating with a written report. May be repeated for credit to a limit of 6 credit hours.

BIO 694 Graduate Project (M.S.) (0-6-3). (Graded S, F, I) A 3-credit version of BIO 693.

BIO 695 M.S. Thesis Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate committee and supervisory professor. Thesis research for students, after submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

BIO 888 Ph.D. Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Ph.D. program, or more than 32 credits, or the M.S. Degree.

BIO 891 Ph.D. Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate program director. Research for students entering the program, before submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

BIO 895 Ph.D. Dissertation Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate committee and supervisory professor. Research for students, after submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

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EVS 506 Ecosystem Science (3-0-3). Introduction to the science of ecosystems. Substantive materials from geology, biology, and chemistry are used to create a picture of the complex systems underlying the world and human society, and how society can manage these systems.

EVS 510 Environmental Geology for Teachers (3-0-3). Detailed examination of geologic hazards and the constraints placed by regional geology and geography on the problems facing modern, urban, industrial societies. Intended for working teachers in area school systems. A significant part of the course involves development of curricular materials for use in participants' own classes.

EVS 512 Geological History of the Cleveland Area for Teachers (3-0-3). Provides a basis for illustrating the relation of regional geology to the physical, economic, and social development of the Cleveland area. Emphasis on laboratory experimentation and field trip studies. Intended for working teachers in area school systems. Part of the course involves the development of curricular materials for use in participants' own classes.

EVS 514 Ecosystem Science for Teachers (3-0-3). Introduction to the science of ecosystems. Substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, and other sciences are integrated to 1) create a coherent picture of the functioning of complex systems underpinning the natural world and human society, and 2) help students understand how society can manage these systems. A significant part of the course involves the development of curricular materials for use in participants' own classes.

EVS 520 Rivers and Watersheds of Northeast Ohio (2-0-2). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the study of watersheds.

EVS 521 Rivers and Watersheds Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or permission of the instructor. Introduction to the practical study of watersheds. Students will examine chemical, biological, and habitat aspects of area streams; study the watersheds of those streams; and carry out limited watershed-modeling exercises designed to help them understand the dynamics of watersheds and the streams that drain them.

EVS 523 Map interpretation and Visualization of Space (1-4-3). Introduction to the uses of topographic, geologic, and specialized maps. Practicum on using maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery to interpret and communicate information on landscape details, geologic and geographic hazards, and land-use planning. Review of physical geology sufficient to allow the student to be able to read and interpret the literature in applied geology for environmental applications.

EVS 525 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2-4-4). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or equivalent.Introduction to Remote Sensing, Geographic Information Systems, and the use of computerized techniques for assessing geographically distributed data, including analysis and presentation of data, and the use of satellite imagery and aerial photography, and commercial and internet data sets. Lectures to be scheduled within lab hours.

EVS 527 Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing and GIS (1-6-4). Prerequisite: EVS 525.Intensive investigation of the techniques and problems associated with using remote-sensed data for GIS-based analyses in geology, biology, and environmental science.

EVS 550 Applied Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300, or BIO 302, or BIO 304, or permission of instructor. Our lives have been increasingly touched by questions pertaining to environmental degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Students will examine ways in which ecological principles can be applied to solving some of these crucial environmental problems. Topics include global climate change, sustainability, agroforestry, biodiversity and conservation, invasive species, ecotoxicology, biomonitoring and bioremediation, and restoration ecology.

EVS 560 Geomorphology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or equivalent. Study of the surface forms of the earth, with emphasis on erosional or depositional processes in different climates, the landforms they produce, and their environmental implications. Includes self-paced laboratory exercises outside of scheduled lectures.

EVS 570 Aquatic Ecosystems (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalents. A study of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. Commonalities and differences beween the physical, chemical and biological components of these ecosystems are discusseed. The impacts of human activities on these ecosysems are covered, as well as water quality assessment techniques, pollution control, and regulation. The course includes three required Saturday field trips.

EVS 571 Aquatic Ecosystems Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalents. Corequisite: EVS 570 Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts coverd in EVS 570, including laboratory and field exercises to introduce students to hands-on sampling and analytical techniques used in water quality measurement. This course includes three required Staturday field trips, each equivalent to two classroom laboratory periods.

EVS 580 Earth System Science for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5). Enrollment is restricted to in-service middle school teachers without science specialty and students enrolled in the M. Ed. Middle School Science program. No credit towards completion of a graduate degree in environmental science. Earth system concepts relevant to teaching middle-school-level earth system science will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.

EVS 581 OhioView Prerequisite in Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 582 OhioView Introduction to Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course including any prerequisites normally required for the course in question. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 585 OhioView Advanced Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course including any prerequisites normally required for the course in question. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 588 OhioView Research in Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 593 Special Topics in Environmental Science, with Lab (1 to 5 credits). Prerequisite: at least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Includes lab or excursions or other practical exercises. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

EVS 594 Special Topics in Environmental Science (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

EVS 596 Independent Study in Environmental Science (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Program Director. Special research problem or independent study course. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Students should make arrangements with an instructor concerning topic, format, and grade criteria before registering for this course.

EVS 597 Independent Research in Environmental Science (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of BGES Graduate Program Director. Special research project or independent study course with lab, field work, or other experimental component. Not for thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Students should make arrangements with an instructor concerning topic, format, and grade criteria before registering for this course.

EVS 680 Issues in Environmental Sciences (3-0-3). In-depth study of significant, conceptual or methodological issues in environmental science from geological and biological perspectives. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

EVS 690 Non-Thesis M.S. Exit Project (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. The exit literature research project for completion of the non-thesis Masters degree in environmental science: an in-depth written review of the literature on a selected topic in environmental science, and its oral defense. May not be repeated for credit.

EVS 691 M.S. Research in Environmental Science (variable: 1-12). Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director. Research prior to approval of the thesis research proposal for students seeking the M.S. degree in environmental science. (Graded S, NS, F, T)

EVS 695 M.S. Thesis Research in Environmental Science (variable: 1-12). Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director. Research following approval of the thesis research proposal for students seeking the M.S. degree in environmental science. (Graded S, NS, F, T)

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