Center for International Services & Programs

Information regarding "Travel Ban 3.0"

Information about the Sept 24, 2017 Presidential Proclamation 9645:  Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats

On September 24, 2017, President Trump issued Presidential Proclamation 9645 entitled Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats (the “Proclamation”).  Certain provisions of the Proclamation were effective immediately; others became effective on October 18, 2017.  Implementation of certain portions of the Proclamation was initially halted by U.S. courts, but on December 4, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Proclamation could be fully implemented.  All provisions of the Proclamation are now in effect.  This webpage provides a summary of information about the Proclamation.

Who is affected?

The Proclamation includes country-specific entry restrictions for nationals of Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen. Nationals from these eight countries should expect increased scrutiny and screening even if they are eligible for visas.  Specific visa restrictions are as follows.

Chad:

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended

Iran:

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry under nonimmigrant visas is suspended, except individuals holding valid student (F and M) and exchange visitor (J) visas.  These visa holders will be subject to enhanced screening and vetting requirements.

Libya:

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas.
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended

North Korea:

  • Entry in all immigrant and nonimmigrant visa categories is suspended. 

Somalia:

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended, but shall be subject to increased scrutiny.

Syria:

  • Entry in all immigrant and nonimmigrant visa categories is suspended. 

Venezuela:

Entry is suspended for Venezuelan nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas, but only for officials of certain government agencies and their family members.  Specifically:  the Ministry of Interior, Justice, and Peace; the Administrative Service of Identification, Migration and Immigration; the Corps of Scientific Investigations, Judicial and Criminal; the Bolivarian Intelligence Service; and the People’s Power Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Yemen:

  • Entry as an immigrant is suspended
  • Entry is suspended for nonimmigrants on business (B-1), tourist (B-2), and business/tourist (B-1/B-2) visas
  • Entry under other types of nonimmigrant visas is not suspended

Have any visas been revoked?

The Proclamation does not revoke existing visas for nationals or citizens of the designated countries.

Are there exceptions to these restrictions?

The entry restrictions do not apply to individuals who were inside the United States or holding valid visas at the time of the effective date of the Proclamation.  In addition, suspension of entry does not apply to:

  • Any Lawful Permanent Residents of the U.S.
  • Dual nationals when the individual is traveling on a passport issued by a non-designated country
  • Individuals whose visa was revoked or canceled under Executive Order 13769
  • Any national admitted to or paroled into the United States on or after the applicable effective date of the Proclamation
  • Any applicant with a document other than a visa, valid on the applicable effective date of the Proclamation or issued on any date thereafter, that permits him/her to travel to the U.S. to seek entry or admission (i.e. advance parole)
  • Any applicant traveling on a diplomatic (A-1 or A-2) or diplomatic-type visa (of any classification), NATO-1 -6 visas, C-2 visa for travel to the United Nations, or G-1, G-2, G-3, or G-4 visa; except certain Venezuelan government officials and their family members traveling on a diplomatic-type B-1, B-2, or B1/B2 visas.
  • Any applicant who has been granted asylum; admitted to the United States as a refugee; or has been granted withholding of removal, advance parole, or protection under the Convention Against Torture.

Are waivers available for the suspension of entry or visas?

The Proclamation indicates that U.S. Department of State consular officers and Customs and Border Protection officers may have discretion to decide on a case-by-case basis to allow visa issuance or entry to the U.S for foreign nationals for whom the suspension of entry would be an undue hardship, who do not pose a threat to national security, and whose entry would be in the national interest.  At this time, there is no separate process for applying for a waiver.

What resources are available for more information?

Additional U.S. government information is available through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Fact Sheet, the U.S. Department of State webpage and the White House FAQ about the Proclamation.  The NAFSA: Association of International Educators also has a detailed resources page.

CSU students, faculty and staff with specific travel questions may contact the Center for International Services and Programs (CISP).

Global Cleveland maintains a list of local immigration law resources, and Asian Services in Action will provide low cost immigration law consultations.