Course Descriptions

Political Science Courses

Faculty

Professors: Charles Hersch, Joel A. Lieske, Qingshan Tan; Associate Professors: David R. Elkins, Rodger M. Govea (Chair), Jeffrey Lewis; Assistant Professors: Il Hyun Cho, Justin Vaughn, Neda A. Zawahri; Emeritus Faculty: Ronald J. Busch, Everett F. Cataldo, Robert B. Charlick, Paul Dommel, Barbara B. Green, John D. Holm, Leon Hurwitz, B. James Kweder, Hans E. Segal.

Course Descriptions

PSC 111 American Government (4-0-4). History and evolution of American political processes, institutions and public policies from the founding period to the present, including importance of federalism, culture, public opinion, parties, interest groups, elections and the media, nature and quality of American democracy, political challenges, dilemmas, and reform. Return to top

PSC 112 Controversial Issues in American Politics (2-0-2). Current controversies in American politics, including affirmative action, welfare reform, immigration policies, gay and lesbian rights, US military intervention abroad, abortion, establishment versus free-exercise of religion, gun control, crime, and civil violence. Frequent use of interactive classroom technologies, multimedia presentations, and political debates to encourage independent thinking, critical analysis, and lively discussions. Return to top

PSC 113 Controversial Issues in World Politics (2-0-2). Combines a brief survey of international relations literature with the use of a discussion/debate format to deal with contemporary issues involving the evolution of world politics and the international economy, national and international security, terrorism, human rights, nationalism, transnationalism, and national power and diplomacy. Return to top

PSC 211 State and Local Government (3-0-3). This course introduces students to features of the American states and their governments. The course will explore similarities and differences among the states' constitutions and key governmental institutions (administrative, legislative and judicial). The course will examine distinctive elements of states' politics with a particular focus on their political cultures and party systems. The course will briefly examine aspects of states' local governments. Return to top

PSC 212 Controversial Issues in American Politics (4-0-4). Focuses on current controversies in American politics, including abortion, gun control, crime, civil violence, affirmative action, welfare reform, campaign finance reform, immigration policies, gay and lesbian rights, establishment versus free-exercise of religion, and U.S. military intervention abroad. Frequent use of interactive classroom technologies, multimedia presentations, and political debates to encourage independent thinking, critical analysis, and lively discussions. Return to top

PSC 213 Controversial Issues in World Politics (4-0-4). Combines a brief survey of international relations literature with the use of a discussion/debate format to deal with contemporary issues involving the evolution of world politics and the international economy, national and international security, terrorism, human rights, nationalism, transnationalism, and national power and diplomacy. Return to top

PSC 217 Urban Politics and the African-American Experience (3-0-3). An examination of urban political institutions, decision processes, and problems of the cities and their suburbs. With regard to each topic, a primary concern will be on racism and its evolving consequences for African-Americans. Return to top

PSC 221 Comparative Politics (4-0-4). Basic concepts and theories of comparative politics through an analysis of selected political systems and governments in Western and non-Western societies. Topics will include ideology, political culture, institutional development, interest group politics, political participation, decision-making, economic development and underdevelopment, collective violence and stability, and political, economic, and bureaucratic elites. Return to top

PSC 227 Power, Authority, and Society in Non-Western Communities (4-0-4). An examination of the way selected groups of Asian, African, and Latin American societies organize themselves with respect to power and authority to cope with a set of similar social problems. Attention will also be given to how changes take place in political organization and in political cultural identity, particularly at the mass level. The course makes extensive use of popular texts and stories, photographs and video, and other primary sources from the cultures studied. Cross-listed with ANT 227/ HIS 227. Return to top

PSC 231 International Politics (4-0-4). Focuses on problems of security and strategies for enhancing security and well-being in the post-Cold War era. Basic concepts and processes of world politics are illustrated through the analysis of great power and regional rivalries. Topics include strategies and instruments such as conventional and nuclear war; alternative security strategies such as economic nationalism, diplomacy, international law, and international organization; and changes in the current international system related to economic globalization, environmental interdependence, transnational movements and nonstate actors. Return to top

PSC 241 Freedom and Authority (3-0-3). An examination of the treatment given to the differing concepts of authority and freedom by major political theorists. Specific concern will focus on the conflicts between the two concepts. Theorists considered include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Madison, Tocqueville, Mill, and Green. Return to top

PSC 251 Introduction to Data Analysis (3-0-3). Sources of information for research in political science, the use of computers as a research tool, and elementary statistical analysis. Return to top

PSC 274 Introduction to the Middle East (4-0-4). This course is designed to introduce students to the history, religious diversity, political systems, economy, and culture of the Middle East. The course includes a brief examination of ancient Middle Eastern civilizations and its history to the world. The course also examines important historical junctures influencing the region today. It will include the contents, similarities, and diversities of Middle Eastern culture. The course examines three monotheistic religions and how Middle Easterners vary widely in their religious beliefs. It explores how this religious variance impacts Middle Eastern culture. The course introduces students to multiple aspects of the arts. Cross-listed with ARB 274 and HIS 274. Return to top

PSC 301 Urban Politics and Policy (4-0-4). An overview of the development and implementation of urban public policies and programs as products of institutions and processes in cities, suburbs and metropolitan areas. Special attention will be given to the condition of African-Americans. Return to top

PSC 305 Cultural Diversity in U.S. Politics (4-0-4). Examines the role of African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and other minorities in American politics. Particular attention is directed at barriers to participation, the critical factors in minority political successes, the problems and possibilities of coalition politics, and related policy issues. Return to top

PSC 310 Constitutional Law (4-0-4). Basic principles of the United States Constitution, including judicial review, separation of powers, the powers of the presidency and Congress, and federalism. Introduction to individual rights and liberties, including right to privacy and the rights of criminal defendants. Return to top

PSC 311 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (4-0-4). Constitutional principles relating to race and sex discrimination; freedom of religion; and freedom of speech, press, and assembly. Return to top

PSC 314 State Government and Politics (4-0-4). Issues between states and nation with particular attention to financial relations. Consideration of the capacity of state legislative and administrative systems, and problems of evaluation and change. Examination of policy-area issues, including those of education and welfare. Return to top

PSC 315 Public Policy and Administration (4-0-4). Evaluation of alternative models for the U.S. policy-making process focusing on the political, institutional and bureaucratic influences of policy decisions. Emphasis will be given to the role public bureaucracies have had in shaping and influencing the policy process in a rapidly changing environment including decision-making, organizational theory, and the historical context of the administrative state. Return to top

PSC 317 Political Parties and Elections (4-0-4). Importance of political parties and elections in American political history and development of the party system; role of public opinion, parties, and interest groups in democratic politics; effects of culture, political socialization, campaign politics, and issues on voting behavior; politics of social movements, the formation of political coalitions, and partisan realignment; party activity at state and local levels. Return to top

PSC 318 The Presidency and Congress (4-0-4). Patterns of cooperation and conflict between the presidency and Congress in the making of United States public policy, both foreign and domestic; examination of issues of congressional revitalization and reform, and the dramatic growth in presidential power. Return to top

PSC 319 Public Opinion (4-0-4). Role of public opinion in democratic theory; methods and problems of polling and survey research; nature, formation, distribution, and learning of political attitudes; issues of democratic stability; group opinions, voting behavior, and elite behavior, and their impact on the policy-making process, public policy, and the quality of American democracy. Return to top

PSC 321 Political Violence (4-0-4). Background conditions leading to political violence and revolution; ideology, class, ethnicity; the state's response to civil violence; strategies to prevent or engender violence; the destruction and reconstruction of consensus in a political system; the effectiveness of violence as a method of political influence; and the basis of political order also explored. Return to top

PSC 323 African Politics (4-0-4). Unique and common patterns of political organization in Africa presented in a comparative framework; historical patterns, nature of colonial rule, impact on precolonial societies; struggle for Pan-Africanism, nationalism and liberation movements; character of postcolonial regimes. Other factors such as settler rule, racism, world economic organization and underdevelopment; domestic political responses to revolution, internal war, ethnic conflict, personal rule, patron-client relations, democratization, military intervention, institutional development, and development of civil society are explored. Return to top

PSC 324 Russia and the Successor States (4-0-4). This course is concerned with the rise and fall of the Soviet system as well as the politics of contemporary Russia and the other post-Soviet states. It considers the prerevolutionary background of the Russian Empire, the revolutions of 1917, the emergence of full-blown Stalinism, decay of the system, Gorbachev's effort at reform and the dissolution of the Soviet system. Focus also placed on nationality issues and the prospects for democratization and economic reform. Return to top

PSC 325 Western European Politics (4-0-4). Governmental structures and political processes in Western Europe; the European community and integration; separatist groups and disintegration; development of European human rights policies and processes, problems and prospects of parliamentary democracy. Return to top

PSC 326 Politics of the Third World (4-0-4). Problems and political dynamics of "developing states and societies" through a study of specific African, Asian, Latin-American, and Middle Eastern countries; class and ethnic conflict; the role of the military and bureaucracy; the capacity of the state to promote economic development and political order; role of global and regional system security and development; structural adjustment and regional autonomy policies. Return to top

PSC 327 Politics of Peaceful World Change (4-0-4). Possibilities for peaceful and equitable solutions to conflicts created by inequalities in economic development, global resource scarcity, the population explosion, and threats of ecological disaster; mechanisms for resolving these conflicts, including alternatives to the present international system; international law and organization. Emphasizes skills such as policy analysis, oral advocacy, nonviolent communications, negotiation, and arbitration. Return to top

PSC 328 International Political Economy (4-0-4). Evolution of international economic policies and theories from mercantilism, and classical liberalism; structural approaches such as Marxism and Dependency, Rational Choice; international trade; international monetary policy and debt; investment and technology exchange; economic and technical assistance; economic integration; and globalization. Return to top

PSC 329 Politics and Political Economy of the European Union (4-0-4). The institutions and policy-making process of the European Union (EU) and the theoretical traditions in the study of European integration. The institutional form of the EU and the type of European political economy and "polity" which is emerging. Return to top

PSC 330 U.S. National Security Policy (4-0-4). An examination of issues affecting U.S. national security and the processes through which policy is made. Includes an examination of U.S. strategy, civil-military relations, regional strategic appraisals, the roles of the Department of Defense and the intelligence community, the revolution in military affairs, peacekeeping, and the challenges posed by failed states, rogue states and non-national adversaries, such as insurgents, narcotraffickers and terrorists. Return to top

PSC 331 United States Foreign Policy (4-0-4). Major issues of American involvement in world politics; analysis of contemporary events and current international tensions; the politics of rivalry and alliance; the evolution of defense strategy; military interventions; diplomatic negotiations; the role of ideology, trade, and aid; U.S. foreign policy decision-making; theories of bureaucracy; interagency and interbranch relations; and role perceptions. Return to top

PSC 332 Politics in the Middle East (4-0-4). Arab-Israeli conflict and relationships among the Arab states; role of the major powers in the Middle East; consideration of ideas and political manifestations of nationalism, the impact of imperialism, aspects of military strategy, problems of development, and the politics of oil; role of ethnicity, tribalism, culture and religion in explaining politics in Middle Eastern states. Return to top

PSC 333 Latin American Politics (4-0-4). Introduction to politics and society in selected Latin American republics; comparison of political systems; governmental approaches to economic and social problems; the role of the military; hemispheric relations; and the U.S. role in Latin America. Course covers Central and South America. Return to top

PSC 334 Causes of War (4-0-4). Course examines the causes and prevention of war in both historical and theoretical perspective. While focusing on mainly the causes of large-scale interstate wars, several contemporary issues of relevance such as nuclear proliferation, ethnic conflict, and terrorism will be discussed in the later weeks of the semester. The course is structured in a way that surveys various causal claims about the origin of war at different levels of analysis. The course will also investigate several historical cases such as World War I, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Return to top

PSC 335 East Asian Politics (4-0-4). Focuses on the politics of China and Japan; political origins of cultural and institutional patterns, including communism, party politics, legislative affairs, local government, the role of government in economic management in promoting social order and social change. Course may deal with several additional East Asian states. Return to top

PSC 337 Canadian Government and Politics (4-0-4). Course examines how the major issues and cleavages in Canadian political life are mediated through the nation's political institutions. The cultural environment and traditions of Canada's people, and the evolution of the governing and partisan institutions of Canadian democracy are also examined. Course also focuses on relationships between Canada and the United States, and how the two nations both challenge and benefit one another. Return to top

PSC 338 Central and Eastern Europe (4-0-4). Focuses on the re-emergence of central Europe, democratization, economic change, and nationalism. Course will consider how the reunification of Germany, the end of the Cold War, and the collapse of the Soviet Union have altered the dynamics of Central and Eastern Europe; and the interplay of East and West in the area of the economic, political and cultural power of a re-united Germany. Return to top

PSC 339 Political Economy of the Middle East and North Africa (4-0-4). This course examines the challenges, obstacles, and prospects for economic development in the Middle East and North Africa. It surveys theories of economic development and applies them to individual states in the region. Specifically, the course addresses questions about the role of natural resources in development. It examines the impact of population growth and the consequences of regional conflict on development. The course explores developmental outcomes in an era of globalization. Return to top

PSC 340 Foundations of Political Thought (4-0-4). Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek-Roman political thought; main currents of medieval political theory, including Augustine. Return to top

PSC 341 Modern Political Thought (4-0-4). Political thought from the Renaissance to the present, focusing on liberalism and its critics, from Rousseau to postmodernism. Emphasis on figures such as Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Foucault, and feminism as well as other theorists. Return to top

PSC 342 American Political Thought (4-0-4). Consideration of thought about American political institutions and practice. Major topics include revolutionary ideas and antecedents; framing of the Constitution and constitutional debate; 19th-century responses to slavery and large-scale industrialism; and modern social construction of race and gender. Other topics may include Jefferson, Paine, Melville, Jacksonianism, Progressivism, and modern liberal thought. Return to top

PSC 391 Special Topics in Political Science (1-0-1). Important political issues of contemporary significance with implications for future change. May include foreign or domestic issues. Topics will be announced. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 392 Special Topics in Political Science (2-0-2). Important political issues of contemporary significance with implications for future change. May include foreign or domestic issues. Topics will be announced. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 393 Special Topics in Political Science (3-0-3). Important political issues with contemporary significance and potential consequences for future change. May include foreign or domestic issues. Topics will be announced. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 394 Special Topics in Political Science (4-0-4). Important political issues with contemporary significance and potential consequences for future change. May include foreign or domestic issues. Topics will be announced. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 401 City Council Internship Program (1 to 6 credits). Prerequisites: Introductory core and completion of the urban specialization or permission of the instructor and students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in their major. Fieldwork assignments with members or committees of Cleveland's City Council. Research paper required. Return to top

PSC 402 Campaign Politics Internship (1 to 6 credits). Prerequisites: Introductory core and completion of a specialization or permission of the instructor and students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in their major. Fieldwork assignments with candidates for public office, examination of the literature on campaigns and elections combined with intensive training in campaign strategy and tactics, and seminars to assess fieldwork experience. Research paper required. (Offered only in even-numbered election years.) Return to top

PSC 403 Administrative Internship Program (1 to 6 credits). Prerequisites: Introductory core and completion of a specialization or permission of the instructor. Fieldwork assignments with executive branch agencies of government, community, or neighborhood organizations and other agencies whose activities are directed toward public-sector concerns; seminars to assess fieldwork experience. Research paper required. Return to top

PSC 405 State Government Administrative Internship (1 to 6 credits). Prerequisites: Introductory core and completion of a specialization or permission of the instructor. Fieldwork assignments with executive branch agencies of state government, seminars to assess fieldwork experience and to examine and discuss operations of state government. Written report required. Return to top

PSC 406 International Relations Internship (1to 5 credits). Prerequisites: Introductory core in political science or international relations, and completion of at least one additional 300- to 400-level course in international politics, or permission of the instructor. Fieldwork assignments with public or private sector actors or with non-governmental organizations with international operations and/or policy interests. Written report required. Does not substitute for PSC 421/422 in the IR major curriculum. Return to top

PSC 407 Summer Internship (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Introductory core or permission of the instructor. Fieldwork assignments with a city council, an administrative organization (government or non-profit), or an electoral campaign. This course does not count toward the completion of the Public Services Specialization. A research paper is required along with a final report on the internship placement. Return to top

PSC 420 Seminar in American Politics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Introductory core and one 300-level course in American politics, or permission of the instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in American politics. Extensive writing assignment required. Detailed description of topics and methods to be publicized in advance. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 421 Seminar in Comparative Politics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Introductory core and one 300-level course in comparative politics, or permission of the instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in comparative politics. Extensive writing assignment required. Detailed description of topics and methods to be publicized in advance. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 422 Seminar in International Relations (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Introductory core and one 300-level course in international politics, or permission of the instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in international relations. Extensive writing assignment required. Detailed description of topics and methods to be publicized in advance. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 423 Seminar in Political Theory (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Introductory core and one 300-level course in political theory or law, or permission of the instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in political theory. Extensive writing assignment required. Detailed description of topics and methods to be publicized in advance. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 424 Seminar in Urban Politics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Introductory core and one 300-level course in urban or American politics, or permission of the instructor. Intensive examination of selected topics in American politics. Extensive writing assignment required. Detailed description of topics and methods to be publicized in advance. May be repeated for credit with departmental permission. Return to top

PSC 496 Independent Study (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of instructor. Independent study guided by faculty member. A substantial written assignment is one of the requirements. May be repeated twice for credit with departmental permission.Return to top

PSC 497 Independent Study (4-0-4). Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of instructor. Independent study guided by faculty member. A substantial written assignment is one of the requirements. May be repeated twice for credit with departmental permission.Return to top

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Cleveland State University
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