Course Descriptions

Physics Courses

Faculty

Professors: Miron Kaufman (Chairperson), James Lock, Jearl Walker, George Walker; Professors Emeriti: Bernard Hamermesh, Herbert Schlosser, Jack A. Soules; Associate Professor Emeritus: Paul Hambourger; Associate Professors: Kiril Streletzky, Thomas Taylor, Jacqueline Vitali, G. Theodore Wood, Ulrich Zurcher; Associate Professors Emeriti: Clyde B. Bratton, George W. Ficken, Ronald Haybron, Robert Klein, Francis C. Stephenson; Assistant Professors: Petru Fodor, Andrew Resnick,; Lecturers: Robert Deissler, Thomas Kiovsky, Jay Reynolds, Alla Zilichikhis; Adjunct Faculty: William Davros, Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Christopher Deibel, Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Toufiq Djemil, Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Matthew Kolar, Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Gennady Neyman, Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Martin Weinhous, Metro Health; Douglas Wilkinson, Cleveland Clinic Foundation; Tingliang Zhuang, Cleveland Clinic Foundation.

Course Descriptions

PHY 101 The Flying Circus of Physics: Motion and Heat (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one unit of high-school algebra. This course covers practical and everyday aspects of physics concepts such as kitchen physics, walking on fire, mechanics of sports, and electricity. Return to top

PHY 102 The Flying Circus of Physics: Sound and Light (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one unit of high-school algebra. Topics include waves, optics, and modern physics, how the eye and camera work, the laser, the theory of relativity, and some basic cosmology (just what is a "black hole" anyhow?). Return to top

PHY 103 The Flying Circus of Physics Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: PHY 101 or PHY 102 or PHY 115 must be taken concurrently. This course is selected experiments in physics. Return to top

PHY 115 Energy and Society (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one unit of high school algebra. This is an introduction to the physical principles behind one of the most important issues for our society: the use, storage and transport of energy and its impact on the environment. Topics covered include non-renewable sources (fossil and nuclear fuels) and renewable sources (solar, hydro, wind). Return to top

PHY 116 Energy and Society Laboratory (0-2-1) Corequisite: PHY115. This course is selected experiments related to the physics of energy. Return to top

PHY 193 Topics in Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: one unit of high-school algebra. Topics chosen by the instructor include "Science Fiction" or "Science of Photography." Return to top

PHY 200 Astronomy Laboratory (0-2-1). This course provides hands-on experience with simple observational astronomy activities. It compliments the educational experience of the Astronomy lecture courses PHY 201 and PHY 202. Either PHY 201 or PHY 202 must be taken concurrently. Return to top

PHY 201 Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies (3-0-3). Prerequisite: One unit of high-school algebra. This is an introduction to astronomy, including stars, stellar evolution, origin of elements, galaxies, and cosmology. Return to top

PHY 202 Astronomy: Planets, Asteroids and Comets (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one unit of high-school algebra. This is an introduction to solar system, including the moon, sun, planets, asteroids, comets, and meteors. Return to top

PHY 205 History of Science I (4-0-4). This course covers the development of scientific thought from antiquity to the 20th century and the new ideas of relativity and quantum mechanics. Key themes are the evolving universe and the development of Newtonian mechanics. Return to top

PHY 206 History of Science II (4-0-4). This course covers the influence of modern physics on the development of scientific thought, including its influence on a new world view. The origin and the future of the universe will be discussed. Return to top

PHY 221 College Physics I (4-2-5). Prerequisites: three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science. This course covers algebra-based physics, including mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids and acoustics . Return to top

PHY 222 College Physics II (4-2-5). Prerequisites: three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, PHY 221. This course covers algebra-based physics, including electricity, magnetism,optics, atoms, nuclei, and elementary particles. Return to top

PHY 231 College Physics I – Biomedical Applications (3-2-4). Prerequisites: three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science. This course covers algebra-based physics, including kinematics, dynamics, mechanical equilibrium, harmonic motion: spring and pendulum, fluids, thermodynamics: temperature, heat, ideal gases, heat engines. Physical principles are applied to problems from biology and medicine. Return to top

PHY 232 College Physics II – Biomedical Applications (3-2-4). Prerequisites: three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, PHY 231. This course covers algebra-based physics, including sound waves, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves and spectrum of light, lenses and microscopes, wave-like properties of particles and structure of atoms, nuclei, and radioactivity. Physical principles are applied to problems from biology and medicine. Return to top

PHY 241 University Physics I (4-2-5). Prerequisites: MTH 181, three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, Corequisite: MTH 182. This course covers calculus-based physics, including mechanics, thermodynamics, and acoustics. Return to top

PHY 242 University Physics II (4-2-5). Prerequisites: PHY 241/ 243, MTH 181, MTH 182, three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, Corequisite: MTH 281. This course covers calculus-based physics, including electricity, magnetism, optics. Return to top

PHY 243 University Physics I (Writing) (4-2-5). Prerequisites: MTH 181, three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, Corequisite: MTH 182. This course covers calculus-based physics, including mechanics, thermodynamics, acoustics. Return to top

PHY 243H University Physics I (Writing; Honors) (4-2-5). Prerequisites: MTH 181, three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science plus either Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. Corequisite: MTH 182. This course covers calculus-based honors physics with lab: mechanics, thermodynamics, acoustics. Return to top

PHY 244 University Physics II (Writing) (4-2-5). Prerequisites: PHY 241/ 243, MTH 181, MTH 182, three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, Corequisite: MTH 281 This course covers calculus-based physics, including electricity, magnetism, and optics. Return to top

PHY 244H University Physics II (Writing; Honors) (4-2-5). Prerequisites: PHY 241/ 243 / 243H, MTH 181, MTH 182, three units of high-school math, three units of high-school science, plus either Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. Corequisite: MTH 281. This course covers calculus-based honors physics with lab: electricity, magnetism, optics. Return to top

PHY 300 Research Methods in the Sciences (2-2-3). Prerequisites: Three units of high school math, three units of high school science. This is a course designed to meet the needs of future science teachers. It provides the students with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems, gives them the opportunity to use these tools to design and perform experiments in a laboratory setting, and enables them to become acquainted with the way scientific information is communicated.

PHY 301 Research Methods in the Sciences -Writing (2-2-3). This course has the same content as PHY 300 but includes writing-requirement credit. Return to top

PHY 310 Introduction to Holography (2-4-3). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (243), PHY 242 (244). This is a laboratory course, involving the production of single- and multiple-beam transmission and reflection holograms, and three-dimensional cylindrical holograms. Return to top

PHY 320 Introduction to Computational Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisite: PHY 221 or PHY 241. This course covers elements of modeling of physical and engineering phenomena using a programming package such as MATHCAD. Topics covered include solving systems of equations, graphing functions, differential equations, and random processes. Return to top

PHY 325 Introduction to Theoretical Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (243), PHY 242 (244), MTH 181, MTH 182, MTH 281. This course covers the physics applications of differentiation, integration, Fourier series, differential equations, complex numbers. Return to top

PHY 330 Introduction to Modern Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (243), PHY 242 (244), MTH 181, MTH 182, MTH 281. This course covers the theory of special relativity, wave properties of particles and particle properties of light, atomic and nuclear structure, radioactivity, and semiconductors. Return to top

PHY 335 Modern Physics Laboratory (2-4-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (or PHY243 or PHY243H), PHY 242 (or PHY 244 or PHY 244H), PHY 330. This is a hands-on exposure to experimental basis of modern physics, including: Milikan oil drop experiment, blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect, NMR, microwaves, and X rays. Return to top

PHY 340 Mechanics and Vibrations (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (243), PHY 242 (244), PHY 330, MTH 181, MTH 182, MTH 281. This course covers central force motion, classical scattering, Coriolis force, variable mass systems: rockets, rotational motion: tops, precession, Lagrange's equation, Hamilton's equations, and damped and driven oscillations. Return to top

PHY 350 Electricity and Magnetism (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 330, MTH 181, MTH 182, MTH 281. This course covers vector analysis; Gauss law, electrostatic potential; electric dipoles; dielectrics; Ampere law and Biot-Savart law; magnetic dipoles, law of induction, displacement currents, and Maxwell equations. Return to top

PHY 360 Electronics Laboratory (2-4-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (243), PHY 242 (244); MTH 181, MTH 182, MTH 281. This course covers AC and DC circuit analysis; steady states and transients; equivalent circuits; diodes, transistors and microprocessors; digital integrated circuits; and sequential logic circuits. Return to top

PHY 395 Physics Seminar (variable credit). Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of instructor. The course covers topics of current interest. Return to top

PHY 400 Conceptual Physics for Middle School Teachers (4-2-5). Prerequisites: Senior standing in B.S. Education: Middle Childhood Education and Licensure. The course provides the content knowledge and skills of scientific inquiry necessary for teaching physics in middle school. Learning objectives are based on the national standards for science for grades four through eight. The course content includes: kinematics, mechanics, heat and temperature, energy, energy transfer, waves, acoustics, light and optics. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry based activities. Return to top

PHY 411 Advanced Physical Laboratory (variable credit). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course involves experiments in fields of current interest to physics faculty. Return to top

PHY 415 Introduction to Biological Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 221, PHY 222 or PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244). As the body of knowledge in physics expands and diffuses into the life sciences, the need for instruction in biological physics increases. Students learn how to use the concepts of physics to analyze and understand important aspects of biological systems. The course is appropriate for students majoring in physics, chemistry, biology, or engineering. Return to top

PHY 416 Macromolecular Crystallography (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 221, PHY 222 or PHY 231, PHY 232, or PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244) and MTH181, MTH182. Macromolecular crystallography is at the heart of the genomics age allowing the determination of the three-dimensional structures of proteins that the genomes code for. This information is used to determine and understand their function and develop new drugs. Students learn the fundamentals of diffraction theory, crystal properties and the basic concepts of solving the structures of macromolecular crystals. The course is appropriate for advanced undergraduates majoring in physics, chemistry and biology. Return to top

PHY 420 Computational Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 320, PHY 330. This course covers numerical solutions to mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and solid-state physics problems. Return to top

PHY 430 Introduction to Medical Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244) or permission of the instructor. This course will introduce students to the medical applications of radiation and imaging physics. Topics covered include interactions of radiation with biological tissues, production and properties of radionuclides, radiation therapy physics, dosimetry, diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and issues of radiation safety. Return to top

PHY 440 Quantum Physics I (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 330, PHY 340. This course covers the uncertainty principle, the Schroedinger equation, probability and measurement, potential barrier and well problems, rigid rotator and harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom. Return to top

PHY 441 Quantum Physics II (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 440, PHY 350. This course covers angular momentum and magnetic moment, Pauli spin matrices, time independent and time dependent perturbation theory, variational approximation, atomic fine structure and hyperfyne structure, partial wave analysis and the Born approximation for quantum mechanical scattering. Return to top

PHY 450 Optics and Electromagnetic Waves (4-0-4). Prerequisite: PHY 330. This course covers Maxwell equations; electromagnetic energy; electromagnetic waves; interaction of light with dielectric and metallic materials: dispersion; geometric optics; lenses and lens aberrations, mirrors, polarization, birefringence, interference, interferometer design, Frauenhoffer and Fresnel diffraction. Return to top

PHY 455 Optics Laboratory (2-6-4). Prerequisite: PHY 450 or permission of instructor. This is an advanced optics laboratory that gives students "hands-on" experience with optical instruments and techniques; experiments on dispersion in glass, interferometry, spectral analysis, diffraction, Gaussian wave optics. It is a student-designed experiment. Return to top

PHY 460 Laser Physics and Photonics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244). This course covers basics of laser operation and photonics. Topics include spontaneous and stimulated emission, the laser principle, laser types, optical detectors, integrated optics. Return to top

PHY 470 Environmental Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 221, PHY 241 or PHY 243. This is the study of physical phenomena underlying a set of current environmental issues. Topics include energy and entropy laws; electromagnetic radiation; forms of energy, including fuels, nuclear, solar; percolation model; chaos theory, including population dynamics, and climate. It involves computer simulations. Return to top

PHY 474 Thermal Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244), MTH 181, MTH 182, MTH 281. This course covers temperature, entropy, thermal equilibrium, equations of state, thermodynamic potentials, thermodynamic stability, and phase transitions; applications, including fluids, electromagnetic radiation, and computer simulations. Return to top

PHY 475 Statistical Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 330, PHY 474. This course covers microcanonical, canonical, grand-canonical ensembles, fermions, bosons; and applications, including fluids, normal modes, solids, metals, electromagnetic radiation, phase transitions, and computer simulations. Return to top

PHY 480 Introduction to Solid State Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244). This course covers electrons in solids; principles of LED and solid-state lasers; optoelectronic properties of semiconductors; materials for optical modulation, data storage and computing; liquid crystals; and flat panel displays. Return to top

PHY 482 Introduction to Solid State Physics (4-0-4). Prerequisites: PHY 241 (or 243), PHY 242 (or 244). This course has the same content as PHY 480 but includes writing-requirement credit. Return to top

PHY 493 Advanced Topics in Physics (variable credit 1 - 4). Prerequisite: Faculty permission. This course includes topics approved by the physics faculty. It may be repeated up to 3 times for a total of 6 credits. Return to top

PHY 497 Independent Study (variable credit 1- 4). Prerequisite: Approval of physics faculty member. Content and credit are arranged with the instructor. Graded S/U. Return to top

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