Course Descriptions

Health Sciences Courses

Faculty

Professors: Susan Bazyk (Director, Master of Science in Health Sciences Program), Bette Bonder, Glenn Goodman (Director, Master of Occupational Therapy Program), Richard Rakos; Associate Professors: John Bazyk (Director, School of Health Sciences), Beth A. Ekelman (Associate Director, School of Health Sciences), John Jeziorowski, Andrew Lammers (Director, Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences Program), Mary K. Milidonis, Kathleen J. Pantano, Monica Gordon Pershey (Director, Speech and Hearing Program), Todd Pesek, Ann Karas Reinthal, Tony Sahley, Amee Shah; Assistant Professors: Ana Begovic-Juhant, Deborah Espy, Michael Hammonds, Stella Iwuagwu, Barbara Prakup; Clinical Assistant Professors: Karen Vitak, Robin Chilton; Adjunct Assistant Professors: Susan Levy Wayne, Karen O'Loughlin (Director, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program); Adjunct Clinical Faculty: Therese Lynch, Sue Ann Neff, Taya Neuman, Myrita Wilhite; College Lecturers: Violet Cox, Sam Mathew.

Course Descriptions

HSC 180 Introduction to Gerontology (3-0-3). This course provides an overview of the demographics of aging, the social, biological, psychological, and functional experience of aging, the concept of successful aging, and the careers available in working with older adults. Cross-listed with PSY 180. Return to top

HSC 200 Introduction to Health Sciences (3-0-3). This course addresses health sciences as a coherent group of disciplines concerned about the functional health of the individual. It focuses on several topics including areas of concern and study in health sciences, service delivery, the nature of the services provided, opportunities within selected fields, the relationship of each field with other related fields within the health sciences, and the impact of changes in health-care delivery on these fields. Return to top

HSC 201 Culture and Human Sexuality (3-0-3). This course examines the influence of cultural values and beliefs on sexual practices; provides an overview of sexual biology; and considers the ways in which culture affects sexuality, sex education, and reproductive practices. Cross-listed with ANT 221. Return to top

HSC 203 Medical Terminology (1-0-1). This online course offers a systematic approach to understanding medical terminology. The focus is to enable students to use this specialized language in a professional health care environment and in scholarly and professional writing. The course is designed to meet the prerequisite requirement for admission to professional programs in the health sciences. Return to top

HSC 220 Infant Health and Development (4-0-4). This course focuses on human development in the first three years of life. It examines normal developmental and health-promoting factors for the prenatal and 0-to 3-year periods. Among the topics covered are intellectual, social, emotional, and physical growth processes. The course also explores the psychological, social, and cultural influences on infant development, including risk and protective factors for infant health. It also examines factors related to optimal infant development, and the broader social implications of development in the first three years of life. Return to top

HSC 305 Culture and Health Care (3-0-3). Prerequisites: One of any of the following courses: HSC 200 (Introduction to Health Careers); ANT 100 (Human Diversity); PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology); SWK 200 (Introduction to Social Work); SOC 101 (Introduction to Sociology); or permission of instructor. This course examines the ways in which culture affects health and health care, including perceptions of health, disease, treatments, and the values associated with these factors. The need for cultural sensitivity in health care is stressed. Return to top

HSC 341 Environmental Health (3-0-3). Environmental Health is an introductory survey of environmental health concepts with an emphasis on toxic exposures, hazard identification, and management strategies. Offered online. Return to top

HSC 344 Social Issues in Health Care (3-0-3).This course examines social issues that influence health and illness through the study of disability and medical rehabilitation. Perspectives of health care practitioner, consumer, regulator, and investor are used to investigate control issues, mutual decision making, and socioeconomic inequalities. Return to top

HSC 345 Child Abuse and Neglect (3-0-3).This course examines current theory and research on the causes and consequences of child maltreatment. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course explores the history and definition, parental and contextual influences and the short- and long-term effects of child maltreatment. Contemporary medical, social, psychological, and legal issues are discussed. Return to top

HSC 346 Women's Health (3-0-3).This course examines psychological, social, and behavioral influences on women's health. It focuses on the interplay of lifestyle factors, and mental and physical health in women. Topics covered include high-risk health behaviors, stress, weight, sexuality, fertility, and promoting health and wellness among women. Emphasis is on understanding women's health from an interdisciplinary perspective. Return to top

HSC 381/581 Pathology (4-0-4). Prerequisite: A physiology course or permission of instructor. This course provides a survey of health conditions as well as the management of common disorders. The continuum from optimum to compromised health states are discussed relative to specific conditions. Common models of conditions that affect health are explored as related to medical management. A discussion of specific disorders and related management is organized according to their etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management as applicable to patients with commonly occurring disorders. Return to top

HSC 393 Selected Topics in Health Sciences (1 to 6 credits).Selected, variable topics in health sciences are investigated. The capstone project requirement is listed under this course and identified by section title and number.Return to top

HSC 407/507 Basic Pharmacotherapeutics (2 or 3 credits). Prerequisites: Pathology and Physiology or equivalent; Cell Biology, Organic Chemistry, and Biochemistry are recommended; or permission of Instructor. This course is an upper level introduction to the basic principles of pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacologic intervention as applied to rehabilitative therapeutic management of clients/patients across the lifespan. The course focuses on the mechanisms of drug action and interaction, observable clinical signs and symptoms that may impact appropriate rehabilitative therapeutic management, and the proper role of pharmacotherapeutics in the overall plan of patient care. Return to top

HSC 408/508 Clinical Hematology (4-0-4). Prerequisites: Microbiology, Histology, Cell Biology, or permission of Instructor. This course provides an in-depth study of the fundamental molecular, cellular, and systems-based human physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts as they apply to the study of the elements of blood and blood producing tissues. Clinical principles applicable to testing, evaluation, and therapeutic intervention across the lifespan and in altered states of wellness are considered. Return to top

HSC 422/520 Physiology for the Clinical Sciences (4-1-4). Prerequisites: A biology course with lab at or above the 200 level and upper-class standing, or permission of instructor. This course is an in-depth study of the fundamental molecular, cellular, and systems-based physiologic concepts as they apply to homeostasis and as they relate to aspects of health, adaptation, and rehabilitation. Physiologic principles applicable to testing, evaluation, and therapeutic intervention across the lifespan and in altered states of wellness are considered. Students complete in-class and virtual lab assignments. Lab fee. Return to top

HSC 426/526 Functional Performance of Older Adults (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in introductory psychology. Assessment and intervention designed to assist older adults to accomplish daily activities, including individual, social, and environmental factors. Return to top

HSC 438H Honors Independent Research I (2 credits). Prerequisites: Health Sciences Honors Program Status, HSC 484.This course facilitates implementation of supervised individual or group research. Students admitted to the Health Sciences Honors Program meet with their adviser and implement a research project proposed and approved in HSC 484 (Advanced Research and Writing in Health Sciences). Return to top

HSC 439H Honors Independent Research II (2 credits). Prerequisites: Health Sciences Honors Program Status, HSC 484 and HSC 438H. Students prepare and submit a manuscript describing their honors research and participate in a research symposium in which they present their projects to and field questions from the Health Sciences Honors Committee, faculty, students, and community participants. Return to top

HSC 440H Honors Cooperative Education Career Experience (2-4 credits). Prerequisites: Health Sciences Honors Program Status, CSC 321; one approved Honors Contract Course and one approved graduate HSC course; or two approved HSC graduate courses applied toward Honors Clinical Cooperative Education Track. Students complete a departmentally approved clinical cooperative education experience and an analysis of relevant literature supporting the student’s clinical track experience. Approximately 2 hours on-site for each credit hour per week. There is a web-discussion component to this course. Return to top

HSC 441H Honors Cultural Competency Cooperative Education Experience (2-4 credits). Prerequisites: Health Sciences Honors Program Status, CSC 321; HSC 505; one approved contract course toward Honors Cultural Competency Track. Students complete a departmentally approved cultural competency cooperative education experience and develop an innovative, creative, or research-based response to the experience connecting theory and practice and demonstrating interpersonal and/or cultural competence. Approximately 2 hours on-site for each credit hour per week. There is a web-discussion component to this course. Return to top

HSC 448 Palliative Care (3-0-3). This course provides an overview of the purposes of palliative care and the roles of health care professionals in providing effective end-of-life interventions. Return to top

HSC 457 Human Gross Anatomy Laboratory (0-4-2). Co-requisite: HSC 475 or permission of instructor. Laboratory sessions include dissection of human cadavers, examination of human skeletal material, and anatomical models. Lab fee. Return to top

HSC 467/567 Practicum in Gerontology (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in introductory psychology; course to be taken with HSC 426/526 or by permission of instructor. This course involves shadowing and discussion of observations in community-based gerontology settings. Return to top

HSC 475 Human Gross Anatomy (4-0-4). Prerequisites: A biology course with lab at or above the 200 level and upper-class standing; or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: HSC 457. This course involves detailed dissection and examination of the back, upper extremity, lower extremity, trunk, and internal structures with an emphasis on function. Return to top

HSC 476/577 Neuroscience Systems (4-0-4). Prerequisites: A physiology course with lab at or above the 200 level or equivalent and upper-class standing; or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: HSC 478. This course is a study of the structure and function of the human central and peripheral nervous system including vascular components and special senses. Return to top

HSC 478/578 Neuroscience Lab (0-2-1). Co-requisite: HSC 476. Laboratory sessions include human nervous system material in the course atlas, human brain dissections, slides, overheads, and anatomical models. Lab fee. Return to top

HSC 483 Writing in Health Sciences (2-0-2). Co-requisites: Must be concurrrently enrolled in any 300-400 level health sciences course except courses that are approved independently as writing across the curriculum. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This course is designed to enhance the writing skills of students, especially with respect to conceptual papers according to APA or AMA format. The instructor, in consultation with the student, will determine the topic of the written report. May be taken multiple times; limit one per semester. Return to top

HSC 484 Advanced Research and Writing in Health Sciences (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Junior standing; MTH 147 or PSY 311 or permission of instructor. This course is designed to facilitate understanding of methods of inquiry in health sciences, including quantitative and qualitative methods for gathering and analyzing data and critiquing and interpreting research. It also covers theory, design, and basic statistics involved in survey and experimental research. Students complete a research grant proposal and scholarly presentation. Return to top

HSC 486 Cooperative Education Career Experience (0-6-3). Prerequisites: CSC 321, HSC 200, 203, 305; PHL 240 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. Health Sciences major; junior or senior status, pursuing a certificate administered by Health Sciences. The focus of the cooperative education career experience is to provide the Health Science major or certificate student with an opportunity to participate in an engaged learning experience that will enhance knowledge relevant to his or her career focus. This experience is also designed to promote and develop professional behavior, oral communication skills, and critical thinking, allowing the student to apply important concepts learned in the major. Return to top

HSC 488 Complementary and Alternative Medicine (3-0-3). Prerequisite: HSC 305 Culture and Healthcare, its equivalent, or permission of instructor. An introductory survey examining Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) - its historical and cultural roots and current application in western contexts. Students will demonstrate an understanding of a variety of CAM approaches and explore their application in both traditional and nontraditional healthcare settings. Using research evidence, students will critically analyze CAM and its applications throughout the course and in a final research project. Return to top

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engaged learning

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Cleveland State University
2121 Euclid Avenue, MC 107A
Cleveland, OH 44115-2214
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