Course Descriptions

Geology Courses

Faculty

Geology is part of the Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences.

Professors: Abbed Babaei, W.B. Clapham, Jr.; Professor Emeritus: Howard H. Lo; Assistant Professor: Fasong Yuan.

Course Descriptions

GEO 100 Introductory Geology (3-0-3). Corequisite: GEO 101. This course is a basic introduction to the composition of the earth, with a detailed discussion of the physical and chemical processes that bring about its continual evolution. Return to top

GEO 101 Introductory Geology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 100. The course includes selected exercises designed to reinforce some concepts covered in GEO 100. Return to top

GEO 106 Introduction to Meteorology (3-0-3). This is an introduction to weather and weather systems, with a detailed discussion on the nature of the atmosphere, air motions, precipitation, storms, weather patterns, and weather analysis. Return to top

GEO 124 Beyond Google Earth (The Science of Looking at the Place We Live) (3-1-4). The course is an overview of the imagery and other tools used by geospatial scientists to evaluate the resources and limitations of the earth's surface. These include geographic positioning systems, aerial photography, satellite imaging, and geographic information systems (GIS), as well as their applications. Laboratory exercises will provide hands-on experience with these technologies and with the techniques used to extract information and understanding from raw geospatial data. Return to top

GEO 140 Development of Continents and Oceans (3-0-3). This is an introduction to the structure and history of continents and ocean basins; an examination of geological provinces of North America, and the sequence of events through geological time that created and changed the earth. Return to top

GEO 150 Geological History of the Earth (3-0-3).This course is an introduction to the history of the earth. It includes an examination of the biochemical and geological evidence for the origin of life and the mechanisms and patterns of evolution, evaluating the most significant events in the evolutionary history of plants and animals through geological time. It also includes an introduction to the structure and history of continents and ocean basins, concentrating on the events through geological time that created the North American continent.Return to top

GEO 151 Geological History of the Earth Laboratory (0-2-1). Pre- or co-requisite: GEO 150. This is a series of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts presented in GEO 150, including interpretation of maps, implication of geological laws and principles, and identification of fossils. Return to top

GEO 170 Origin and History of Life (3-0-3). Topics include biochemical and geological evidence relating to the origin of life and the mechanisms and patterns of evolution; and significant events in the evolutionary history of plants and animals. Return to top

GEO 204 Mineralogy (3-2-4). Prerequisites: GEO 100/ 101, CHM 261, or permission of the instructor. One year of chemistry recommended. This course is the study of the nature, chemistry, and crystal structure of minerals. The course is shared with the University of Akron. When offered at Akron, lecture components will be available at CSU using distance learning facilities but laboratories will be only in Akron. Return to top

GEO 206 Petrology (3-2-4). Prerequisites: GEO 100/ 101 and one year of chemistry or permission of the instructor. This course is the study of silicate minerals and the way they and non-silicate minerals form rocks. The course is shared with the University of Akron. When offered at Akron, lecture components will be available at CSU using distance learning facilities but laboratories will be only in Akron. Return to top

GEO 210 The Earth and Human Affairs (3-0-3).). Topics include the examination of geologic hazards, such as earthquakes, landslides, floods, and shoreline erosion, including class discussion of current events of this type.The course also includes an examination of the development of society. Return to top

GEO 230 Natural Resources (3-0-3).This course includes the examination of our natural resources with emphasis on nonrenewable fossil fuels and mineral resources; a discussion of the effect of population growth and technology on rates of consumption, mineral economics, and the concept of "reserves"; and the future outlook with regard to alternative sources of energy, substitutes, and recycling. Return to top

GEO 293 Special Topics in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics reflect material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for regular, continuing course offerings. The course may be repeated for up to 16 credits with a change in topic.Return to top

GEO 302 Paleobiology (3-2-4). Prerequisites: GEO 100/101 or permission of the instructor. This is the study of the origins, evolution, and fossil record of life and the development of living things over the last half-billion years. The course is shared with the University of Akron. When offered at Akron, lecture components will be available at CSU using distance learning facilities but laboratories will be only in Akron. Return to top

GEO 312 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (3-0-3). Prerequisites: GEO 100 and GEO 323, which may be taken concurrently with GEO 312, or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: GEO 313. This is the study of the origin, dispersal, deposition, and lithification of sediments; variation of sedimentary parameters; discussions of facies, correlation, use of sedimentary structures, and paleographic reconstruction; and regional stratigraphy of North America.

GEO 313 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy Laboratory (0-2-1). Co-requisite: GEO 312. This course consists of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 312. Return to top

GEO 314 Paleoecology (3-0-3). Topics include environmental reconstruction using fossils; particular attention given to organism-sediment interrelations, organism diversity, distribution adaptive morphology, and community structure. Return to top

GEO 320 Structural Geology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: GEO 100, GEO 101and GEO 323 or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: GEO 321. This is the study of the forces involved in the deformation of the earth's crust and the mechanical properties of materials, with emphasis on the recognition, interpretation, and illustration of the resultant geologic structures. Return to top

GEO 321 Structural Geology Laboratory (0-2-1). Co-requisite: GEO 320. The course includes a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 320. Return to top

GEO 323 Geospatial Concepts and Tools (1-4-3). This is a practicum on environmental geography, concentrating on the information, concepts, and tools we use to visualize and analyze the environment. Basic information sources include maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery. Analytical tools include direct observation and measurement of these sources, as well as an introduction to the use of geographic information systems and image processing for remote sensing. The course is intended for majors in biology, environmental science, and geology. Return to top

GEO 350 Introduction to Oceanography (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Minimum of two science courses. This course includes the examination of the interrelated physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes operating in sea water and ocean basins; selected topics relating to the geologic interpretation of the marine rock record; factors regulating growth and environmental habitat of organisms; and the geophysics of ocean basins. Return to top

GEO 354 Geochemistry (4-0-4). Prerequisites: GEO 100 and GEO 101, or permission of instructor. This is the study of geochemical principles and their application to geologic processes. Topics include radiometric dating, element abundance, water chemistry, sedimentary geochemistry, and the geochemistry of invertebrate skeletons, particularly their isotopic, and trace element compositions. Return to top

GEO 358 Field Geology of the Cleveland Area (2-0-2). Prerequisites: Two courses in science or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: GEO 359. This course describes the geological history of the Cleveland area and illustrates its relation to the physical, economic, and social development of Cleveland. The course will include laboratory exercises but will emphasize field trip studies. Return to top

GEO 359 Field Geology of the Cleveland Area Laboratory (0-2-1). Co-requisite: GEO 358. This course is comprised of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 358. Return to top

GEO 390Writing in Geology I (2-0-2). Prerequisite: a declared geology major and permission of the BGES Geology Advisor. Corequisite: Students must be concurrently enrolled in a 300- or 400-level geology course. This course is designed to develop the writing and oral presentation skills of students through assigned projects and in-class activities. Students will write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. The 300/400 level Geology course instructor, in consultation with the student, will determine the topic of the written report. Writing Return to top

GEO 404 Environmental Science for Teachers (3-0-3). Prerequisites: At least three courses in the College of Education at the 300-level or above, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on the application of environmental science to the classroom. Substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, and other sciences will be integrated to create a coherent picture of the functioning of the complex systems underpinning the natural world and human society; and the ability for students to understand how society can manage these systems. This course is intended for students working toward school certification. A significant part of the course will be the development of curricular materials based on course content for use in participants' own classes. Return to top

GEO 408 Environmental Geology for Teachers (3-0-3). Prerequisites: At least three courses in the College of Education at the 300-level or above, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course is a detailed examination of geologic hazards and the constraints placed by regional geology and geography on the problems facing modern, urban industrial societies. It is intended for students working toward school certification. A significant part of the course will be the development of curricular materials based on course content for use in participants' own classes. Return to top

GEO 410 Geological History of the Cleveland Area (3-0-3). Prerequisites: At least three courses in the College of Education at the 300-level or above, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course provides a basis of illustrating the relation of regional geology to the physical, economic, and social development of the Cleveland area. The course will emphasize laboratory experimentation and field trip studies. Return to top

GEO 425 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (2-4-4). Prerequisite: GEO 323. This course is an introduction to Geographic Information Systems and the use of computerized techniques for assessing geographically distributed data. The course will include the use of GIS techniques to analyze data and present those analyses. It will concentrate on the use of satellite imagery and aerial photography, as well as standardized data sets available from commercial sources and the World Wide Web. Laboratory is selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in lecture. Return to top

GEO 427 Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems (1-6-4). Prerequisite: GEO 425. The course is an intensive investigation of the techniques and problems associated with using remote-sensed data for Geographic Information Systems-based analyses in geology, biology, and environmental science. Return to top

GEO 444 Hydrogeology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: At least one course at the 300-level or higher in Geology (excluding GEO 404, 408, and 410). Co-requisite: GEO 445. This is the study of the concepts and principles of ground-water flow in rocks, sediments, and soils. The course will deal with flow in both saturated and unsaturated zones, and will include issues related to ground-water use, pollution, and ground-water monitoring both for quality and quantity. Laboratory exercises will cover mathematical and computer solutions to equations and real life situations. Some field work will be required. Return to top

GEO 445 Hydrogeology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 444. This course is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 444. Return to top

GEO 451 Field Geology (Minimum of 4 credits). This course covers geological mapping using aerial photographs and topographic maps; solution of field problems in stratigraphy, structure, and paleontology. A written report is required. The course is offered in the summer at selected universities. Return to top

GEO 460 Geomorphology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: GEO 323 or permission of instructor. This is the study of the surface forms of the earth, with emphasis on erosional or depositional processes in different climates and the forms they produce. Laboratory is selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in lecture.Writing Return to top

GEO 490 Internship in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This is an independent study related to work experience for majors in Geology and Environmental Sciences. Return to top

GEO 493 Special Topics in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics are to reflect material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for regular, continuing course offerings. Return to top

GEO 496 Independent Study in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. This is an independent study of material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for or covered in regular course offerings. The course may be repeated for credit with change of topic. Return to top

GEO 497 Research in Geology (1 to 12 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Undergraduate research carried out by special arrangement. The student may work independently or as an assistant to a faculty investigator. The course may be repeated for up to 16 credit hours. Return to top

GEO 499 Exit Evaluation (0-1-0). Prerequisite: Senior standing. Final exit examination and outcomes assessment evaluation required of all graduating seniors. Graded S/U.Return to top

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