Course Descriptions

English Courses

Faculty

Professors: Rachel Carnell, Jennifer M. Jeffers, Ted Lardner; Associate Professors: Nuala Archer, Gary R. Dyer, Michael Geither, Adrienne Gosselin, F. Jeffrey Karem, David Larson (Chairperson); Assistant Professors: Michael Dumanis, James Marino, Imad Rahman, Stella Singer, Adam Sonstegard; Term Instructors: John Brentar, Rajeswari Mohan, Barbara Walker; Director: William Breeze (First Year Writing Program); Director: Mary Murray McDonald (Writing Center); Professors Emeriti/Emeritae: Earl R. Anderson, Cynthia Edelberg, David Evett, John C. Gerlach, John A.C. Greppin, Daniel C. Melnick, Glending Olson, David Richardson, Leonard M. Trawick; Associate Professors Emeriti: Louis R. Barbato, James A. Barthelmess, Harold E. Dailey, P. Jeffrey Ford, Phillips Salman, Arnold G. Tew.

Course Descriptions

The First-Year Writing Program

College Writing I and II (ENG 101 and 102) (or an approved equivalent writing course) are university-degree requirements, designed to concentrate on composition skills that are essential for success in many college courses and most professions. These courses lay the foundation for the university's Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) course requirements. Students should, therefore, enroll in ENG 101 as soon as possible in their college careers. Students taking First-Year Writing courses at Cleveland State must earn a C or better in both ENG 101 and 102 (or its equivalent) in order to graduate.

Placement Testing: Before enrolling in ENG 101, all students, including transfer students who have not taken Freshman English, must complete the placement process. Placement is done through ACT/SAT scores. Students who are not ready for ENG 101 may be placed in ENG 099 or 100.

Placement for international students or students without ACT/SAT scores: International students should take the English Placement Exam. If they do not place into ENG 101, they should register for ESL 096, which will prepare them for the First-Year Writing series.

ENG 101-102 as Matriculation Requirements: All students, in order to graduate from Cleveland State University, must complete the First-Year Writing requirement within the first 30 hours of academic work at the university by passing ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or equivalent course) with grades of C or better. Students who have not completed ENG 102 (or equivalent course) within their first 30 hours may not register for any further courses without registering for the appropriate writing course.

Contact information :
For First-Year Writing: Jane Dugan, 216-687-2532 or William Breeze, 216-523-7145.

Courses

ENG 099: Introduction to College Writing (1-1-2).Prerequisite: Placement by ACT/SAT scores or English Placement Exam. This course is a workshop course designed to provide individualized instruction for students working below the English 100 level by helping them become more confident and skillful college writers. Students who complete ENG 099 with a grade of “C” or better are eligible to enroll in ENG 100. Credits earned in ENG 099 do not count toward graduation. Return to top

ENG 100: Intensive College Writing I (4-1-3). Prerequisite: Placement by ACT/SAT scores or English Placement Exam, or completion of ENG 099. This course provides students with intensive writing instruction in the basic skills of expository and argumentative writing. Supplemental instruction is provided in the form of a tutorial component. Each Fall and Spring semester, a special section of ENG 100 is offered for students whose native language is not English. ENG 100 and ENG 101 cannot both be counted toward fulfillment of the first-year writing requirement. Note: students who earn an A in ENG 100 or ENG 101 may take ENG 240 or ENG 241 in lieu of ENG 102. Students who exercise this option may count the credits earned in the alternative course toward fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement and the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement. Three credits earned in ENG 100 count toward graduation. Return to top

ENG 101: College Writing I (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Placement by ACT/SAT scores or English Placement Exam. This course instructs students in the basic skills of expository and argumentative writing. Each Fall and Spring semester, a special section of ENG 101 is offered for students whose native language is not English. ENG 101 and ENG 100 cannot both be counted toward fulfillment of the first-year writing requirement. Supplemental instruction is available for this course by taking ENG 105. Note: students who earn an A in ENG 100 or ENG 101 may take ENG 240 or ENG 241 in lieu of ENG 102 . Students who exercise this option may count the credits earned in the alternative course toward fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement and the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement. . Return to top

ENG 102: College Writing II (3-0-3).Prerequisite: Placement by ACT/SAT scores or English Placement Exam, or completion of ENG 100 or ENG 101. ENG 102 continues to cultivate and hone the skills acquired in ENG 100 or ENG 101, but also incorporates research and information literacy skills. Each Fall and Spring semester, a special section of ENG 102 is offered for students whose native language is not English. Supplemental instruction is available for this course by taking ENG 106. Note: students who earn an A in ENG 100 or ENG 101 may take ENG 240 or ENG 241 in lieu of ENG 102. Students who exercise this option may count the credits earned in the alternative course toward fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement and the Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.Return to top

ENG 102H Honors College Writing II (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. An advanced introduction to academic research and writing through intensive investigation of an issue or topic specified by the instructor. Students will be required to develop and organize a substantial research project related to the topic of the course and to demonstrate the information literacy skills required to find, evaluate and make appropriate use of primary and secondary materials relevant to their project. Return to top

ENG 105 Writing Center I (2 credits). Workshops and tutorials to assist students taking ENG 101 or 102; also available to students for help with writing assignments in other courses. Pass/fail grading system. Return to top

ENG 106 Writing Center II (2 credits). Prerequisite: ENG 105. Workshops and tutorials on writing, with topics based on the particular writing problems experienced by students. Pass/fail grading system. Return to top

Note: Students may earn no more than 4 credit hours for Writing Center courses.

English as a Second Language Courses

(See ESL Courses page and contact the Division of Continuing Education for further information at 216-687-4850.)

Sophomore-Level Courses

Completion of ENG 101 and 102 is a prerequisite for all courses numbered ENG 201 and above.

ENG 201 Intermediate Expository Writing (4-0-4). Practice in reading and writing non-fiction essays, with attention to audience, purpose, voice, tone, style, development, organization, and research. Students who need extra help with writing may be required to take ENG 106 Writing Center concurrently with ENG 201. Return to top

ENG 203 Creative Writing: Forms and Techniques (4-0-4). This course is a reading and “workshop” introduction to the fundamental working modes (poetry, fiction, drama, and creative non-fiction) of creative writing, based in a broad survey of literary approaches and viewed from the standpoint of the writer.Return to top

ENG 204 Nonwestern Literature (4-0-4). Significant literary works representing cultures of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Includes such authors as Basho, Mo Yan, Mishima, Yosano, Ruben Dario, Borges, Garcia Marquez, Vargas Illosa, the griot Kouyate, Maran, Achebe, and Soyinka. Cross-listed with MLA 204. Return to top

ENG 206 Literature and American Culture (4-0-4). Selected works of American literature illustrating American myths central to our culture's self-conception. Includes such writers as Franklin, Thoreau, Twain, Hemingway, Ellison, and Arthur Miller. Return to top

ENG 207 African American Literature (4-0-4). Introduction to the tradition of African-American literature and its underlying historical experiences, cultural values, and modes of literary expression. Return to top

ENG 207H African American Literature: The City (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. This course will examine the Black urban experience in texts by African American authors writing over the course of the 20th Century. Our scope of consideration will include migration to northern cities at the end of the Civil War, the Black Migration during the First World War and patterns of racial development, as well as racial discrimination in the Black urban community. Literary interpretation will focus on ways in which the Black community reacted to and circumvented racist legislation in urban planning and landscape. Students will learn to consider the literature within a socio-historical context. Our approach to examining literature will be interdisciplinary and literary texts will be presented in chronological order, with attention to identifying and analyzing connections between historic and contemporary issues facing urban environments. Return to top

ENG 208 Womanism/Feminism (4-0-4). Literature reflecting the women's movement in America. Initial focus examines 19th-century bi-racial origins and ideologies to establish definitions of womanism as distinct from feminism and to frame readings of women's movements across ethnic and cultural communities in America over the 20th century. Return to top

ENG 210 Native American Literature (4-0-4). Introduction to literature by Native Americans, with emphasis on their cultural diversity and their struggle for national survival and identity. Return to top

ENG 240 Introduction to Poetry (4-0-4). The study of poetry written in English, with emphasis on its forms and distinctive characteristics. Students will develop their ability to analyze literary texts and to write persuasive essays about them. Particular attention will be paid to understanding some principal genres of poetry. The course will include poets, both women and men, from several different historical periods in which English verse has been composed, and poets from the diverse national/ethnic groups who have written in English. To place English poetry in the context of world literature, some poems composed in other languages will be read in translation. This course introduces English majors to research and critical techniques needed for the baccalaureate study of literature. Alternate for ENG 102 with approval. Return to top

ENG 240H Introduction to Poetry - Honors (4-0-4). Prerequisites: Honors standing or permission of University Honors Program. Successful completion of ENG 101 and ENG 102 or ENG102H is required for eligibility. ENG 240H is an Honors version of the standard ENG 240 (Introduction to Poetry). It aims to equip students with the critical vocabularies and techniques necessary to effectively analyze, discuss, and write about poetry. ENG 240H students gain new insights into the ways in which poems function by attending to the formal elements of poetry and discovering how poetic form relates to meaning. The class considers a variety of poetic traditions and explores how particular genres or forms have been reinvented within and across various literary cultures. Return to top

ENG 241 Introduction to Fiction and Drama (4-0-4). An introduction to analyzing and writing about literature, focusing on the genres of fiction and drama. Students will learn techniques for reading analytically and critically and for writing critical/research papers on fiction and drama. The course will examine the generic characteristics of a variety of types of fiction and drama, including works written in English by men and women from diverse ethnic/cultural groups and some translated works illustrating various national traditions. Alternate for ENG 102 with approval. Return to top

ENG 241H Writing about Literature: Fiction and Drama - Honors (4-0-4). Prerequisites: Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. Successful completion of ENG 101 and ENG 102 or ENG 102H is required for eligibility. This course teaches students how to analyze, discuss and write critically about fiction and drama at a level appropriate for honors level English majors. While all sections of ENG 241 teach students the skills of critical thinking and writing about literature, this honors course will also help students understand the histories and ideologies behind the types of analyses they are learning to perform on literature. Students will engage with critical sources at a sophisticated level, in preparation for their senior honors project. Return to top

ENG 248 Multicultural Literatures of the United States(4-0-4).An introduction to the literatures (in English or in translation) of one or more minority groups, defined by race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and/or physical condition; such as Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian-Americans, women, persons who are LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, and Questioning), and/or persons with disabilities. Topics, texts, and approaches will vary. Return to top

ENG 271 Shakespeare and Film (4-0-4). Essential plays of Shakespeare studied and viewed in performance on videotape. Return to top

ENG 280 Classical Literature in Translation (4-0-4). Readings from the literature of classical Greece and Roam, with emphasis on critical analysis and writing about texts in the context of ancient and modern debates about their meaning. Readings include at least one of the three major epics: the Iliad, the Odyssey, or Virgil's Aeneid. Return to top

Upper-Division Courses

English majors are advised to take ENG 240 and 241 before taking courses numbered ENG 330 and above. Equivalency rule for transfer students: one 200-level literature course, or permission of the instructor, is prerequisite for literature courses numbered ENG 300 and above. This prerequisite does not apply to linguistics courses (ENG 310-318).

Courses on Writing and Composition Theory

ENG 301 Advanced Expository Writing (4-0-4). Discussion and practice of writing in nonfiction genres such as the essay, technical writing, and journalism. Return to top

ENG 302 Rhetoric of the Law (4-0-4). Analysis of strategies used in a variety of legal contexts such as closing arguments in criminal trials or arguments before the Supreme Court. Return to top

ENG 303 Creative Writing (4-0-4). Techniques of nonexpository writing, applicable to poetry, fiction, drama, and creative non-fiction. Non-majors are advised to take the course on a pass/fail basis. Return to top

ENG 305 Creative Writing Workshop (4-0-4). Prerequisite: ENG 303 or ENG 304 or permission of instructor. Craft course in poetry, fiction, playwriting, or a specialized creative writing topic. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 307 Style (4-0-4). Experiments with the effects of diction, syntax, punctuation, and other linguistic tools in the creation of meaning, using the student's own writing. Return to top

ENG 308 Composition Theory for Teachers (4-0-4). To prepare teachers to effectively integrate writing instruction in the secondary language arts curriculum, this course provides information about current beliefs and best practices that characterize what top teachers do. Return to top

ENG 309 Writing Center Practicum (1-4-2). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor based on evaluation of a writing sample. Composition and tutoring theory integrated with practical experience in the teaching of writing. May be repeated for up to 4 credits. Counts toward the secondary English certification requirement in advanced composition. Return to top

Linguistics Courses

ENG 310 Traditional Grammar (4-0-4). Survey of traditional grammar, its history and present use in the schools. Cross-listed with LIN 310. Return to top

ENG 311 Elements of Linguistics (4-0-4). Survey of phonology, morphology, syntax, historical linguistics, semantics, pragmatics, and psycholinguistics with reference to modern English. Cross-listed with LIN 311. Return to top

ENG 313 Studies in Linguistics (4-0-4). Core course in a mainstream linguistic topic, such as American English dialects, historical linguistics, morphology, history of the English language, modern English grammar, semantics, or sociolinguistics. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 314 Applied Linguistics (4-0-4). Course in the professional application of linguistics, such as Language Diversity and Teaching English, Lexicography, or English as a Second Language. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Cross-listed with LIN 314. Return to top

ENG 315 Introduction to the English Language (4-0-4).   An overview of the main components of a linguistic description of English and of the history of the language with an introduction to some relevant areas of applied linguistics: language acquisition; regional and social dialects; socio-linguistics; and pragmatics. Cross-listed with LIN 315. Return to top

ENG 318 Language Analysis (2 or 4 credits). Prerequisite: ENG/LIN/MLA/ANT 260 or ENG 311 or a strong background in a foreign language. Topics may include Sanskrit, Hittite, Classical Armenian, Old English, Old Norse, or Gothic, studied with an emphasis on grammar and linguistic issues. May be repeated as the continuing study of one language, or with a change of topic. A two-semester sequence of one language (such as Sanskrit I and II), or a semester of Old English followed by a semester of Old Norse or Gothic, may satisfy the foreign language requirement. Students who take Sanskrit I and II (4 credits each) may take second year Sanskrit III and IV (2 credits each). Cross-listed with LIN 318. Return to top

Literature Courses

ENG 320 Classical Literature in Translation (4-0-4). Survey of major literature of ancient Greece and Rome, including the Iliad, the Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, and other significant works by classical authors. Return to top

ENG 321 British Literature I (4-0-4). Survey of British literature from its Anglo-Saxon beginnings to 1789. Return to top

ENG 322 British Literature II (4-0-4). Survey of British literature from 1789 to the present. Return to top

ENG 330 Studies in Ancient Literature (4-0-4). Study of a single aspect of ancient Greek, Roman, or other classical literature, such as Greek tragedy, feminist approaches to the classics, oral poetics, a writer, genre, theme or period. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 331 Studies in Medieval Literature (4-0-4). Topics include Arthurian tradition, Dante, Malory, women and writing, and other medieval themes and genres. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 332 Studies in Renaissance Literature (4-0-4). 16th- and 17th-century authors, genres, themes, or movements, including humanism, the Reformation, metaphysical and cavalier poetry, and scientific empiricism. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 333 Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements in 18th-century poetry, fiction, and drama. Possible topics include the Enlightenment, satire, the rise of the novel, and neoclassical and pre-Romantic poetry. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 334 Studies in 19th-Century British Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements in 19th-century poetry, fiction, and drama. Possible topics include Romantic-era women writers, the literature of British imperialism, and the fiction of Jane Austen. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 335 Studies in 20th-Century British and Anglophone Literature (4-0-4). Modern and contemporary British and Anglophone authors, genres, themes or movements. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 336 Studies in Non-Western Literature (4-0-4). Reading and analysis of literary texts from non-Western cultures. Possible topics include: Non-Western Epic; Native American Literature; Contemporary Non-Western Fiction. English majors enrolled in the Multicultural/Multiethnic concentration may take the course up to three times with change of topic as multicultural electives. Return to top

ENG 342 Survey of American Literature (4-0-4). American literature from the 17th century to modern times, intended to provide a sense of historical movements -- colonialism, federalism, romanticism, realism, modernism. Return to top

ENG 345 Studies in American Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements of significance in American literature. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 346 Studies in American Fiction (4-0-4). Studies in the American short story and/or novel focusing on a specific author, theme, movement, period, or subgenre. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 347 Studies in African-American Literature (4-0-4). Authors, themes, or movements of significance in African-American literature. Topics include slave narratives, Harlem Renaissance, literature of the 1950s, African-American women authors. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 348 Studies in Multicultural Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements representing the ethnic diversity of modern American or world literature. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 350 Studies in Fiction (4-0-4). Authors, themes, or movements significant in British, American, European, or world fiction. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 351 Studies in Drama (4-0-4). Authors, themes, or movements significant in British, American, European, or world drama. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 352 Studies in Poetry (4-0-4). Authors, themes, or movements significant in British, American, European, or world poetry. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 355 Major Themes or Genres (4-0-4). Themes or genres significant in British, American, European, or world literature. Topics in the past have included European Romanticism, and multicultural literature and pedagogy. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 360 Studies in Literary Criticism (4-0-4). Study of milestones in criticism by Aristotle, Sidney, Johnson, Wordsworth, and Arnold, and/or of modern and contemporary critical movements such as new criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, feminist criticism, and post-structuralism. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 361 Classical Rhetoric (4-0-4). Tradition of rhetoric established in ancient Greece and Rome and its continuing influence on literature and composition. Return to top

ENG 363 Gender Issues in Literature (4-0-4). Studies in gender theory and gender issues in literature. Topics may include contemporary feminist themes, writings of women of a particular ethnicity such as Asian-American or Latina; the intersection of gender, race, and class; the relationship of gender to voice, technique and genre; archetypes and how questions of language are linked to these issues. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 364 Popular Culture (4-0-4). Critical methodology and study of genres in such areas as science fiction, the western, gothic romance, comparative studies in literature and film, or mass media aesthetics. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 370 Chaucer (4-0-4). Study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and other works. Return to top

ENG 371 Shakespeare I (4-0-4). Study of Shakespeare's comedies and romances. Return to top

ENG 372 Shakespeare II (4-0-4). Study of Shakespeare's tragedies and history plays. Return to top

ENG 374 Milton (4-0-4). Study of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes and other works of Milton. Return to top

ENG 375 Major Author (4-0-4). Intensive study of a major author writing in English. May be taken up to three times with change of topic. Return to top

ENG 380 Imagination Conference (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based upon manuscript submission. Intensive five-day summer workshop with visiting writers (fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction); "craft" analyses of creative writing. Students complete a manuscript at the beginning of summer semester and present the manuscript in revised form at the end of the summer semester. In addition to tuition, students will be charged a Workshop and Materials Fee. Contact Imagination Conference web site http://www.csuohio.edu/class/imagination/. Return to top

ENG 382 Canonicity (4-0-4). The word “canon” refers to an authoritative and universally recognized body of texts. This course is devoted to examining the history, concept and legitimacy of the canon in English literature. Return to top

ENG 390 Literary Magazine (1 or 2 credits). Prerequisite: Approval of faculty adviser to the literary magazine. Practicum in professional editing, writing and administration of a literary magazine. Graded S/U only; does not count toward the major. Current options are editorial work on the Whiskey Island magazine, or work in the preparation of reviews of poetry books for the Burning Press. May be repeated for up to four credits. Return to top

ENG 391 Fiction Workshop (4-0-4).Prerequisite: ENG 203 or 303 or permission of instructor.Craft course in the writing of fiction.May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.Return to top

ENG 392 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (4-0-4).Prerequisite: ENG 203 or 303 or permission of instructor. Craft course in the writing of creative non-fiction.May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.Return to top

ENG 393 Playwriting Workshop (4-0-4). Prerequisite: ENG 203 or 303 or permission of instructor.Craft course in the writing of playscripts. May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.Return to top

ENG 394 Poetry Workshop (4-0-4). Prerequisite: ENG 203 or 303 or permission of instructor.Craft course in the writing of poetry. May be taken up to three times. May count toward the English major or creative writing concentration only twice.Return to top

ENG 396 Independent Study (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisites: Written permission of the instructor and prior approval by the Committee on Instruction in the English Department at least two weeks prior to the term in which the independent study would begin. Intensive study of a specialized topic growing out of 300-level English course work. Students may count up to four independent study credits toward the major. A student must be in good academic standing to qualify for an independent study. Independent studies cannot be given as substitutes for courses that normally are offered in the curriculum. Contact the English Department for further information. Return to topReturn to top

ENG 397 Portfolio Preparation (1 credit). Prerequisites: The student must be enrolled in the Writing Certificate Program and must have earned at least 12 credits toward the Writing Certificate, or, alternatively, must obtain permission from the instructor. Individual or group instruction in the preparation of a professional writing portfolio. Emphasis is on revision of writing projects, and preparation and presentation of texts. Graded S/U only; does not count toward the English major or minor. Offered each semester in the Writing Center. Return to top

ENG 490 Professional Internship (1 or 2 credits). Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty anchor and field supervisor. Internships are available through Career Services. Professional writing interns must have completed all university writing requirements. Return to top

ENG 495 Senior Seminar (4-0-4). Prerequisite: English major with senior standing or permission of instructor. Literature studied in the context of significant theoretical questions: an author, genre, or theme considered from a variety of critical perspectives. The seminar may be repeated with change of topic.Return to top

ENG 496H Honors Research Project. 4 credits. Prerequisites: Student must be an honors student (or, with special permission from the English department, a scholars student) and must obtain written permission of the instructor and written prior approval of the project by the Committee on Instruction in the English Department at least two weeks prior to the term in which the research project would begin. Intensive independent research project on a specialized topic growing out of a 300-level English course work. The student and professor must meet for the equivalent of at least one hour per week, and the student must produce a significant final written product: in literary analysis, a research paper of 20 to 25 pages; in creative writing, a minimum of 20 pages of poetry, a complete play, or 30 pages of fiction or creative non-fiction. This course is required of all honors English majors. This project cannot be given as a substitute for courses that normally are offered in the curriculum.

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engaged learning

Mailing Address
Office of Undergraduate Studies
Cleveland State University
2121 Euclid Avenue, MC 107A
Cleveland, OH 44115-2214
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