Course Descriptions

Biology Courses

Faculty

Biology is part of the Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences.

Professors: Sailen Barik, R. Jeffrey Dean (Chair), F. Paul Doerder, Michael A. Gates, Michael Kalafatis, Robert A. Krebs, Donald G. Lindmark, Tobili Y. Sam-Yellowe, Harry van Keulen, Crystal M. Weyman; Professors Emeriti: Lorry J. Brenner; Associate Professors: G. Valentin Börner, A. Ralph Gibson, Anton A. Komar, Bibo Li, Barbara K. Modney, Tony Sahley, Jacqueline Vitali, B. Michael Walton, Julie A. Wolin; Associate Professors Emeriti: Richard C. Dickerman, Randall J. Gee, Madeline M. Hall, Sally Lewis, Jerome B. Senturia, James M. Willard; Assistant Professors: Roman Kondratov, Barsanjit Mazumder, Andrew Resnick, Girish Shukla; Adjunct Faculty: Alexandru Almasan, William Baldwin, Cornelia Bergmann, Kathleen L. Berkner, Clemencia Colmenares, Paul E. DiCorleto, Rebecca Drenovsky, Paul L. Fox, Mary Gardiner, Karen Gerken, Neetu Gupta,Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Joe Hannibal, Jaharul Haque, Corinne Hartwell, Stanley Hazen, Philip Howe, Donald W. Jacobsen, Trine Joergensen, Jeffrey Johansen, Andrew Jones, Sadashiva Karnik, Andrea Ladd, Cathi Lehn, Xiaoxia Li, Jocelyn McDonald, Thomas McIntyre, Ronald J. Midura, Christine S. Moravec, Laura Nagy, Daniel R. Petit, Javier Provencio, Jun Qin, Hugh R. Quinn, Miguel E. Quinones-Mateu, Ofer Reizes, Terry Robinson, Neal S. Rote, Michael J. Ryan, Ephraim Sehayek, Robert H. Silverman, Roy L. Silverstein, Jonathan D. Smith, George Stark, Dennis J. Stuehr, Vincent Tuohy, Riqiang Yan, Bin Zhang.

Course Descriptions

Note: The 100-level biology courses are intended primarily for non-science majors. Courses with "Human" in their titles discuss biological principles using humans as the main illustrative example.

BIO 100 The Living World (3-0-3). This is an introduction to the biology of all major groups of living things, including microbial, unicellular, and parasitic organisms, as well as multicellular plants, animals, and fungi. The fundamental concepts of evolutionary and functional biology will be introduced through a systematic survey of the varieties of life. BIO 109 should be taken concurrently. Return to top

BIO 102 Human Genetics, Reproduction, and Development (3-0-3). This course covers the genetics and development of humans including application of genetic technology to humans. BIO 107 should be taken concurrently. Return to top

BIO 104 The Brain (3-0-3). This course is an introduction to the nervous system and the brain.Topics include discussion of the function of brain cells, sensory systems, motor systems, and higher functioning in mammalian systems. Normal and abnormal functions of the human brain are emphasized. BIO 107 should be taken concurrently. Return to top

BIO 104H Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. Corequisite: BIO 105H. This honors course will survey the organization and function of the mammalian brain, emphasizing the human brain when possible. The nervous system is analyzed throughout a range of levels from the molecular basis of neuronal functioning to the system levels that govern behavior and cognition. The course emphasizes fundamental principles of neural functioning and the experimental methods by which that information is obtained. Return to top

BIO 105H Neuroscience Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. Corequisite: BIO 104H. This course consists of selected experiments to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 104H. Exercises range from the classical demonstration of the ionic basis of the action potential to psychosocial experiments. Return to top

BIO 106 Human Biology in Health and Disease (3-0-3). This is an introduction to biological principles. Topics include discussion of cell structure, cell function, and physiology of digestion, circulation, excretion, and coordination in normal and disease states. BIO 107 must also be taken and passed in order to receive Natural Science GenEd 08 credit. Return to top

BIO 107 Human Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). This is a laboratory study of diverse aspects of human biology. Topics include cell structure and function, human anatomy, physiology, disease, genetics, reproduction, development, and aging. BIO 106 must also be taken and passed in order to receive Natural Science GenEd 08 credit. Return to top

BIO 108 Environmental Ecology (3-0-3).This course covers concepts of ecology as they relate to environmental problems in today's world. This course is for non-science majors.. Return to top

BIO 109 Biological Diversity Laboratory (0-2-1). This is a laboratory study of past and present biological diversity, the importance and value of diversity, and the threats posed by human populations to the maintenance of biological diversity. Return to top

BIO 110 Plants and Civilization (3-0-3). This course covers the nature and uses of plants, the effects of plants on civilization and vice versa. BIO 109 should be taken concurrently. Return to top

BIO 112 Biology of the Dinosaurs (3-0-3). Dinosaurs are used to illustrate fundamental concepts of biology. Topics include methods of classification, evolutionary mechanisms including extinction, the process of fossilization, a survey of major dinosaur groups, and biological principles of biomechanics, physiology, and behavior. Current theories and controversies concerning dinosaur biology are evaluated. One or two class meetings are held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. BIO 109 should be taken concurrently. Return to top

BIO 130 Biology of Human Diversity (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Completion of General Education requirements in the areas of English Composition and of Mathematics and Logic. The purpose of this course is to provide a scientific consideration of the validity of the concept of human races. Sufficient background information in biology is introduced to cover the essential ideas involved in measuring human biological diversity. All students must write an 8- to 12-page research paper on some scientific aspect of human biological variation. Return to top

BIO 168 Biology of Aging (3-0-3). This course covers the various biological theories of aging, together with a review of the fundamental concepts of cell biology and physiology on which these concepts are based.Return to top

BIO 171 Summer Local Flora ( 2-4-4 ). This is the study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in summer. The course includes lecture, laboratory, and field work. Return to top

BIO 173 Spring Local Flora ( 2-4-4 ). This is the study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in spring. The course includes lecture, laboratory, and field work. Return to top

BIO 194 Special Topics in Biology (variable 1-6 credits). This is the study of a particular topic in biology. Topics to be announced in the course schedule each semester. The course may be repeated for credit with change of topic. Return to top

Note: Courses numbered 200 and above are intended primarily for Biology majors, Health Science majors, Nursing majors, and other science majors. Courses numbered 260 to 272 do not fulfill the requirements for the Biology major, but may be used for the biology minor.

BIO 200 Introductory Biology I (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 201. This is an introduction to modern biology covering basic principles of molecular and cell biology, immunity, genetics, evolution, and biological classification. Return to top

BIO 201 Introductory Biology Laboratory I (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 200. This course is comprised of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 200. Return to top

BIO 202 Introductory Biology II (3-0-3). Recommended prerequisite: BIO 200. Corequisite: BIO 203. This is an introduction to modern biology including a survey of biological diversity, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, principles of ecology, and human impact on ecosystems. Return to top

BIO 203 Introductory Biology Laboratory II (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 202. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 202. Return to top

BIO 260 Human Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 200. This course is a discussion of basic Mendelian and biochemical genetics with emphasis on chromosomal and molecular disorders. Return to top

BIO 264 Introductory Microbiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Upper-level high-school biology or BIO 106. Corequisite: BIO 265. The course covers principles of microbiology, and immunology, including pathogenic microorganisms, and viruses. Return to top

BIO 265 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 264. This course is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 264. Return to top

BIO 266 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Upper-level high-school biology, or BIO 106, or BIO 200, or HED 210. Corequisite: BIO 267. This is a systems approach to human anatomy and physiology. Return to top

BIO 267 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 266. This course is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 266. Return to top

BIO 268 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 266. Corequisite: BIO 269. Continuation of BIO 266. This is a systems approach to human anatomy and physiology. Return to top

BIO 269 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 268. This course is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 268. Return to top

BIO 270 Human Nutrition (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 106, or 200, or 268. This course is an introduction to human nutrition, including nutritional requirements throughout life, nutrient value, metabolic requirements, nutrition and disease, malnutrition and undernourishment, dieting supplements, and dietary fads. Return to top

BIO 300 Plant Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and 202. Corequisite: BIO 301. This course covers plant diversity, structure, function, and evolution. Return to top

BIO 301 Plant Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 300. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 300. Return to top

BIO 302 Animal Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and 202. Corequisite: BIO 303. This course covers animal diversity, structure, function, and evolution. Return to top

BIO 303 Animal Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 302. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 302. Return to top

BIO 304 Population Biology and Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and 202. Corequisite: BIO 305. This course covers population genetics, evolutionary processes, population ecology, and biogeography. Return to top

BIO 305 Population Biology and Evolution Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 304. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 304. Return to top

BIO 306 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (4-0-4). Prerequisites: BIO 200, 202, and CHM 331. This course is a discussion of the essential concepts underlying biochemistry. Topics include chemical concepts, structure of biological molecules, catalysis, metabolic regulation, and molecular genetics. Return to top

BIO 308 Cell Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200, 202 and CHM 331. This course covers the structure, function, and biogenesis of cellular organelles and the cytoskeleton.  It includes discussions of development at the cellular level, inter- and intra-cellular signaling, and regulation of the cell cycle. Return to top

BIO 309 Cell Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 308. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 308. Return to top

BIO 310 Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and BIO 202. This course covers the principles of transmission and molecular genetics in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, with emphasis on classical and molecular analysis techniques and their interpretation. Return to top

BIO 311 Genetics Recitation (0-2-1). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 310. This course covers problem solving, demonstrations, and special projects with emphasis on databases and Web tools for genetic and bioinformatic analyses. Return to top

BIO 380 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5).Enrollment is restricted to students seeking middle school licensure. No credit towards biology major or minor. Biological concepts relevant to students seeking middle school licensure will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.. Return to top

BIO 390 Writing in Biology I (2-0-2). Prerequisite: a declared biology major. Co-requisite: Students must be concurrently enrolled in a 300- or 400-level biology course. Students must obtain permission of the Biology Adviser prior to registering for this course. This course is designed to develop the writing and oral presentation skills of students through assigned projects and in-class activities. Students write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. The 300/400 level Biology course instructor, in consultation with the student, determines the topic of the written report. Return to top

BIO 391 Writing in Biology II (1-0-1). Prerequisites: BIO 390and a declared biology major. Corequisite: Students must be concurrently enrolled in a 300- or 400-level biology course. Students must obtain permission of the Biology Adviser prior to registering for this course. Students write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format and give in-class oral presentations. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. The 300/400 level instructor, in consultation with the student, determines the topic of the written report. May be repeated with change of the 300/400 level course. Return to top

BIO 400 Orientation for Medical Technology Students (1-0-1).Prerequisite: Admission to the Medical Technology major. No credit towards biology minor. The course includes pre-clinical orientation; general aspects of the hospital training program; concept of the medical technologist as a member of the health-care delivery team; lectures by education coordinators of hospital schools; and visits to hospital clinical laboratories. Return to top

BIO 401 Urban School Service Learning in Biology (0-2-1).Prerequisites: Major in biology and at least two biology courses at the 300 level. Permission of biology adviser needed. No credit towards biology minor. This is a service learning field course that involves assisting science teachers at a designated urban middle or high school for two hours per week. It requires a brief, reflective paper on the experience. May be taken twice for credit. Return to top

BIO 408 Animal Cell Culture (2-2-3). This course covers theoretical and practical introduction to methods of animal cell culture necessary for research in biomedical or biotech labs and in the pharmaceutical industry. Techniques include choice of medium, passaging, freezing, tests of purity and viability, stable and transient transfection, and preparing primary cultures. Return to top

BIO 410 Theory and Practice of Light Microscopy (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Corequisite: BIO 411. This course is a consideration of diverse theoretical and practical aspects of the light microscope. Return to top

BIO 411 Theory and Practice of Light Microscopy Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 410. Laboratory exercises and projects undertaken outside of scheduled class time provide practical experience with various uses of the light microscope. Return to top

BIO 412 Elements of Immunology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 306 and BIO 308. This course covers the nature of antigens, antibody structure and function, B and T cell activation, cytokines, immunoassays, terminology. Return to top

BIO 413 Elements of Immunology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 412. This course covers immunochemical assays and cell culture techniques; preparation of single-cell suspensions and determination of cell viability; andidentification and quantification of antigen-antibody interactions. Return to top

BIO 414 Parasitology (2-0-2). Corequisites: BIO 302 and BIO 415. This is a basic course primarily designed for biology majors who desire an understanding of animal parasitology, including ecology, life histories, and host-parasite relationships. Return to top

BIO 415 Parasitology Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 414. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 414. Return to top

BIO 416 Microbiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 306. Corequisite: BIO 417. This course covers the structure, function, and genetics of major groups of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria; and the role of microbes in the economy of nature and man. Return to top

BIO 417 Microbiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 416. This course covers the techniques of identification, manipulation, and quantification of microbes. Return to top

BIO 418 Histology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Corequisite: BIO 419. This course covers the structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs, with emphasis on relationships of structure and function. Return to top

BIO 419 Histology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 418. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 418. Return to top

BIO 420 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (2-0-2). Prerequisite: BIO 302. Corequisite: BIO 421. This is a comparative study of gross structure and evolutionary development of vertebrate organ systems. Return to top

BIO 421 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 420. This lab involves the detailed dissections of representative vertebrate specimens. Return to top

BIO 422 Mammalian Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 302. Corequisite: BIO 423. This course covers the physiology of major organ systems of vertebrates, with an emphasis on mammalian physiology. Students may not take both BIO 422 and BIO 424 for credit. Return to top

BIO 423 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 422. Exercises that emphasize modern methods of physiological measurement, and the analysis and presentation of physiological data. Return to top

BIO 424 Principles of Animal Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 302. Basic concepts of comparative animal physiology will be developed from fundamental principles of chemistry, biology, and physics. The evolution of major physiological systems will be examined through a comparison of taxa ranging from protists through vertebrates. Students may not take both BIO 422 and BIO 424 for credit. Return to top

BIO 425 Principles of Animal Physiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIO 424. This course is comprised of exercises that emphasize modern methods of physiological measurement, and the analysis and presentation of physiological data. Return to top

BIO 426 Neurobiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 302 or equivalent. This is an exploration of the relation of behavior to neural function. Topics include basic neurophysiology and properties of sensory and motor systems illustrated with human and nonhuman examples. Students may not take both BIO 426 and HSC 476 for credit. Return to top

BIO 427 Neurobiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 426. This course covers classical invertebrate experiments that provide an introduction to standard neurobiological techniques for studying neural activity, including simple dissection, stimulating and recording neural activity, and analyzing data. Return to top

BIO 428 Endocrinology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. This is an introduction to functions of hormones and endocrine glands, including mechanisms controlling hormone secretion; mammalian systems emphasized. Return to top

BIO 430 Bioinformatics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 306 and BIO 310. A course in either statistics or computer science is highly recommended. This course is an introduction to the tools and techniques of bioinformatics, with emphasis on computational techniques to analyze genomic and proteomic data. Topics include searching of databases, sequence alignment and analysis, phylogenetic methods and computer programming to analyze database information. A project using original or Internet bioinformatics tools is required. Return to top

B10 432 Molecular Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. This course covers the principles of modern molecular genetics and gene regulation. Return to top

BIO 434 Elements of Pharmacology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 302 and BIO 306. This course is an analysis of the basic principles of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of selected therapeutic agents. Emphasis will be on the experimental basis of drug discovery, design, and clinical use. Return to top

BIO 435 Techniques in Molecular Biology ( 1-6-4 ). Prerequisite: BIO 308. This is a lecture/laboratory course in fundamentals of modern biotechnology with emphasis on the techniques and procedures of molecular biology. Students will work together to complete a project. Return to top

BIO 436 Evolutionary Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 304 and 310. This is an introduction to the modern theory of evolutionary genetics, including development of the concepts of genetic diversity, natural selection, random genetic drift, population substructure, infinite-alleles models, and the neutral theory of molecular evolution. Return to top

BIO 438 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. This an advanced study of topics in cell and molecular biology. Papers from the primary scientific literature are read and discussed. Return to top

BIO 450 Evolutionary Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 300 or 302, and 304. This course is comprised of advanced lectures on evolution that consider traits, genes, and their interaction with environmental variation. Topics include the basic quantitative methods required to interpret evolutionary change, the consequences of population structure, molecular approaches to phylogenetic studies, and the changes in genetic variation under different models of selection, drift, migration, and mutation. Return to top

BIO 453 Field Experience in Ecology and Conservation Biology (1 to 6). Prerequisites: BIO 300 or 302, and 304. This course  examines principles of ecology and conservation biology through field research in a natural setting. Students participate in research projects emphasizing analyses of biodiversity, population demography, species interactions, or behavior. Following preparatory sessions at Cleveland State University, the class  travels to off-campus field sites for the balance of the course. Living conditions may be primitive in the field and international travel may be required. See semester course schedule and contact the biology office (216) 687-2440 for further information. Return to top

BIO 454 Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 300 or 302, and 304. This is the study of interactions of organisms with their environment, including growth and regulation of populations, energetics of organisms and ecosystems, life-history evolution, and community ecology. Return to top

BIO 455 Ecology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 454. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 454. The laboratory includes a few one-day field trips on weekends. Return to top

BIO 456 Vertebrate Biology and Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 302 and 304. Topics cover the biology of vertebrates, with special emphasis on those aspects that relate to the evolutionary history of the group; lectures on the basic mechanism of Darwinian evolution. Return to top

BIO 458 Behavior (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 302 and 304. This is an introduction to, and survey of, animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Return to top

BIO 462 Evolutionary Ecology of Sexual Reproduction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or BIO 302. Although organisms spend huge amounts of energy carrying out activities related to sexual reproduction, it is by far the most dominant mode of reproduction. This course explores that dilemma and examines various modes of sexual reproduction in diverse organisms in an evolutionary context. Return to top

BIO 464 Developmental Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. The fundamental principles of development  are illustrated using classical invertebrate and vertebrate systems. The molecular, genetic, and cellular bases of development are  integrated with classical descriptive and experimental approaches. Return to top

BIO 465 Developmental Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 464. This is an examination of important mechanisms and concepts operating in developing animal systems. Laboratories expose students to both classical embryology and modern molecular approaches to experimental developmental biology. Return to top

BIO 468 Theories of Aging (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. This course is an inquiry into the reasons why some organisms show aging in the form of senescence, while other organisms seem to be perennial, or at least long-lived. Current theories of aging will be critically analyzed. Return to top

BIO 471 Summer Local Flora (2-4-4). Prerequisite: BIO 300. This is the study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in summer. It includes lecture, laboratory, and field work. Return to top

BIO 472 Wetland Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisites: BIO 300 and BIO 304. This is a  study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components of wetland ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in wetland ecosystems and community interactions are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and analyses used in wetland ecology. Techniques in wetland characterization and delineation are covered. Return to top

BIO 473 Spring Local Flora (2-4-4). Prerequisite: BIO 300. This is the study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in spring. It includes lecture, laboratory, and field work. Return to top

BIO 474 Stream Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 302 or 304 or equivalent. This is a  study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components in stream ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in aquatic environments, community interactions, and ecosystem energetics are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and stream ecosystem analyses. Techniques in stream habitat and water quality assessment are covered. To facilitate outdoor excursions, may be scheduled outside normal semester dates and graded initially with a T grade. Return to top

BIO 476 Plant Biochemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 300 and 308. Corequisite: BIO 477. This course covers the basic physiological processes in plants; photosynthesis, uptake of nutrients, respiration, growth, and the role of hormones and enzymes involved in these processes. Return to top

BIO 477 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 476. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 476. Return to top

BIO 478 Morphology of Angiosperms (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300. Corequisite: BIO 479. This is a study of the overall form, development and, to a minor extent, microscopic structure of the vegetative and reproductive structures of flowering plants. Return to top

BIO 479 Morphology of Angiosperms Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 478. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 478. Return to top

BIO 480 Developmental Plant Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300. Corequisite: BIO 481. This course covers plant anatomy and morphogenesis: a comparative study of the origin, differentiation, and structure of cells, tissues, and organs in higher plants, with emphasis on evolutionary development. Return to top

BIO 481 Developmental Plant Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 480. This is a set of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 480. Return to top

BIO 490 Honors Research (1 or 2). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. This course is supervised research in a faculty member's laboratory on a project approved by the Honors Program Committee. May be repeated for credit. Return to top

BIO 491 Honors Thesis and Defense (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. This is the written report on honors research project and a public defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. Return to top

BIO 492 Honors Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. This is the oral reports on selected topics, including the honors research project. May be repeated for credit. Return to top

BIO 494 Special Topics in Biology (1 to 6 credits). Prerequisite: at least junior standing. This is the study of a particular topic in biology. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. It may be repeated for credit with a change of topic up to 12 credits. Return to top

BIO 495 Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisites: Senior standing and major in biology. Presentation of student reports on topics of the instructor's choice. Return to top

BIO 496 Independent Study in Biology (variable 1 to 6 credits). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, or permission of biology adviser. This is a special study and directed reading of selected topics for undergraduate biology majors. It may be repeated, but no more than 8 credits of any combination of BIO 490, BIO 496, and BIO 497 will be allowed towards the biology degree. For WAC credit for pre-2008 students, must include a minimum of 3000 words or 1500 words/credit—whichever is more—of writing per credit, performed in accord with the preGenEd08 WAC requirements. For GenEd08 WAC credit, must be combined with BIO 390 or BIO 391. Return to top

BIO 497 Independent Research in Biology (variable 1 to 6 credits). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and permission of biology advisor. This is a special research course for undergraduate biology majors. It may be repeated, but no more than 8 credits of any combination of BIO 490, BIO 496, and BIO 497 will be allowed towards the biology degree. Students must obtain the permission of a faculty supervisor of the project before registering. For WAC credit for pre-2008 students, must include a minimum of 3000 words or 1500 words/credit—whichever is more—of writing per credit, performed in accord with the preGenEd08 WAC requirements. For GenEd08 WAC credit, must be combined with BIO 390 or BIO 391. Return to top

BIO 499 Exit Evaluation (0-1-0).Prerequisite: Senior standing. Final exit examination and outcomes assessment evaluation required of all graduating seniors. Graded S/U. 

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Office of Undergraduate Studies
Cleveland State University
2121 Euclid Avenue, MC 107A
Cleveland, OH 44115-2214
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