Course Descriptions

Art Courses

Faculty

Professors: George Mauersberger; Associate Professors: Samantha Baskind, Marian Bleeke, Kathy Curnow, Irina A. Koukhanova, Qian Li, Russell Revock, Richard D. Schneider, Jennifer Visocky-O'Grady(Department Chair); Assistant Professors: Mark Slankard; Gallery Director: Robert Thurmer.

Course Descriptions

Note: Nonrefundable materials fees are required for all studio courses and are paid with tuition.

Studio Art  |  Art Education  |  Art History

Studio Art

ART 102 Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art and Design (2-6-4). This course is a beginning study of basic principles of two-dimensional visual organization and skills. It includes line, value, texture, color, shape, and other elements of form as they relate to two-dimensional art and design. The course is a prerequisite for all subsequent two-dimensional studio art courses and all studio courses above 200. Return to top

ART 103 Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art and Design (2-6-4). This course is a beginning study of basic principles of three-dimensional visual organization and skills. It includes line, value, texture, color, shape, and other elements of form as they relate to three-dimensional art and design. The course is a prerequisite for all subsequent three-dimensional studio art courses and all studio courses above 200. Return to top

ART 104 Introduction to Digital Art & Design (4-0-4). This class is a broad introduction to technology as it applies to art and design. It requires no previous art experience, but is intended to be an introductory exposure to the technical skills needed to establish good working practice as a studio art major. The course consists of two in-depth projects, supporting short exercises/assignments, and two exams designed to meet the established learning objectives. Return to top

ART 211 Drawing I (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 102. This is a beginning study of design principles, materials, and techniques of drawing. Return to top

ART 221 Painting I (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 102.This is a beginning study of design principles, materials, and techniques of painting. Return to top

ART 226 Sculpture I (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 103. This course is a beginning study of design principles and techniques of three-dimensional visual expression with practical experience in metal casting. It requires a materials fee. Return to top

ART 231 Printmaking I (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 102. This is a beginning study of design principles and techniques of selected printmaking processes. It requires a materials fee. Return to top

ART 232 Photography I (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 102. This is a beginning study of black-and-white photography and darkroom techniques. It requires a materials fee. Return to top

ART 242 Introduction to Typographic Principles and Design (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 102.This course is an introduction to design aesthetics and the visual organization of information. Students focus on learning typographic and aesthetic fundamentals and then applying these principles to two-dimensional design collateral with specific themes. Current design theory and practical application arealso studied in conjunction with project development. Return to top

ART 244 Introduction to Macintosh (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 102. This is an introduction to computer design using a Macintosh platform. The course begins by developing an understanding of the current Macintosh operating system, and with a brief introduction of technical issues related to using the computer for design purposes. The remainder of the course is devoted to studying the industry standard page layout, illustration, and photo alteration software (InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop). The course requires a materials fee. Return to top

ART 246 Ceramics I (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 103. This is a beginning study of design principles and use of ceramic materials in solving problems of three-dimensional form using hand building methods and the potter's wheel. The course requires a materials fee. Return to top

ART 311 Drawing II (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 103 and ART 211. This is a continued investigation into the concepts, materials, and techniques of drawing. Return to top

ART 321 Painting II (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 103 and ART 221. This course is a continued investigation into the concepts, materials, and techniques of painting.Return to top

ART 326 Sculpture II (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 102 and ART 226. This course is an investigation of three-dimensional form leading to the development of individual styles and the use of various materials. The course requires a materials fee.Return to top

ART 331 Printmaking II (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 103 and ART 231. The course involves a continued investigation of concepts, materials, and techniques in printmaking. It requires a materials fee.Return to top

ART 332 Photography II (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 103 and ART 232. This is a continued study of black-and-white darkroom techniques and concepts of photographic imagery. It requires a materials fee. Return to top

ART 344 Advanced Raster-Image Development (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 103, ART 242 and ART 244. This course is a comprehensive instruction on the creation of raster-based imagery using photo-manipulation software (Adobe Photoshop). Technical topics include advanced image manipulation, color issues, file management, cross-program compatibility, and production and end-usage concerns. Raster image-based design and illustration issues are also explored. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 345 Advanced Vector-Image Development (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 103, ART 242 and ART 244. This is a comprehensive instruction on the creation of vector-based imagery using illustration software (Adobe Illustrator). Technical topics include object-oriented image creation and manipulation, color issues, file management, cross-program compatibility, and production and end-usage concerns. Vector image-based design and illustration issues are also explored. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 346 Ceramics II (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 102 and ART 246. This is a continuation of formal development through the use of the potter's wheel; emphasis is placed on decoration and glaze application. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 405 Introduction to Museum Studies – Exhibition Planning and Design (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 102, 200-level art-history course. This course provides a practical overview of the concepts and practices of exhibition curating (as opposed to collections curating). The course focuses on planning and design of exhibitions. Topics include thematic development, the purpose of the exhibition, presentation philosophies, presentation aesthetics, audience analysis, facility analysis, conceptual organization, spatial organization, traffic flow, information flow, art handling, installation techniques, lighting, graphics, publications, publicity, security, and the "whole" exhibition experience. Return to top

ART 411 Drawing III (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 311. This is an investigation into more advanced approaches to drawing. It may be repeated an additional 16 hours. Return to top

ART 421 Painting III (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 321.This is an investigation into more advanced approaches to painting. It may be repeated an additional 16 hours. Return to top

ART 426 Sculpture III (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 326. This course places emphasis on the development of individual approaches to three-dimensional form by extensive investigation of specified project areas. It may be repeated an additional 16 hours. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 431 Printmaking III (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 331. This is an investigation into more advanced approaches to printmaking. It may be repeated an additional 16 hours. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 432 Photography III (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 332. This course is an advanced study of photographic techniques and concepts, with emphasis on development of a personal style. It may be repeated an additional 16 hours. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 444 Advanced Typography and Design (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 344.This course involves comprehensive instruction on the creation of design collateral using page layout and typesetting software (InDesign). Focus is placed on print-based media. Students study the creation and production of a design piece, from initial production schedules and creative brainstorming and problem-solving techniques to aesthetic development and modes of output. Focus is also placed on technical, aesthetic, and communication issues. Professionalism is stressed. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 445 Introduction to Digital Media (2-6-4). Prerequisites: ART 344. This is a broad introduction to digital media, specifically that which is used on the World Wide Web. Students study information and interface design as well as analyze the structure and content of interactive media. Projects involve the development and implementation of site architecture in conjunction with aesthetic considerations specific to the Web. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 446 Ceramics III (2-6-4). Prerequisite: ART 346. This is a continuation of formal development on an advanced level through the use of the potter's wheel and glaze calculation. It may be repeated an additional 16 hours. There is a materials fee. Return to top

ART 450 Design Studio Capstone (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Completion of upper division courses in Graphic Design sequence (may be taken concurrent with final 400 level course in concentration). This course serves as the capstone requirement for Studio art majors who have selected Graphic Design as their concentration. Throughout the semester we meet university capstone requirements by promoting and enhancing skills in critical thinking, information literacy, oral communication, and writing. Students spend the semester focused on the development of a professional design portfolio. All classroom activities are focused on network building, self-promotion, and professional preparation. Standards for grading are based on a variety of criteria including (but not limited to): attendance, effort, quality of research, completion of assignments, visual and technical exploration, critical analysis skills exhibited in both writing and oral presentation, and enthusiastic participation.

ART 451 Art Studio Capstone (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Completion of upper division courses in one Studio sequence (may be taken concurrent with final 400 level course in concentration). This course introduces students to professional practices as related to their major in studio art. Itís designed to promote writing, critical thinking, oral communication, and assist future BA graduates in furthering their careers in the arts. Multiple career paths are discussed through practical applications based on real life requirements. Upon successful completion of this course, students from different concentrations within the department are able to face challenges outside of the academic environment.

ART 493 Special Topics in Studio Art (2-6-4). Prerequisite: For students of advanced level of expertise who have completed a 200-level studio art course. Check semester course schedule footnote for topics. The intensive study of subject or topic is announced in advance. It may be repeated for credit. There is a materials fee for some sections.

ART 496 Independent Studies in Studio Art and Design (0-2-1 or 1-3-2 or 1-5-3 or 2-6-4).Prerequisite: Written permission of instructor, 8 credit hours at advanced Level III in field of choice. This course is comprised of studio projects in advanced work. Sections are: (1) graphic design, (2) ceramics, (3) drawing, (4) painting, (5) photography, (6) printmaking, (7) sculpture, (8) other (4 credits), and (9) other (2 credits). It may be repeated for credit. There is a materials fee for some sections. Return to top

 

Art Education

ART 341 Valuing Processes in the Visual Arts (4-0-4). This is an exploration of art criticism and aesthetics as part of a comprehensive art education program with practical application in a PreK-12 setting. Return to top

ART 393 Special Topics in Art Education (4-0-4 or 2-6-4). This is an intensive study of a relatively narrow subject or topic to be announced in advance.Return to top

ART 396 Independent Reading and Research: Art Education (2 or 4 credit hours). Prerequisite: Written permission of instructor. This is the study of an art education topic of special interest to the particular student. The subject and plan of study  is decided jointly by student and instructor. It may be repeated for credit. Return to top

ART 441 Art in Social and Vocational Contexts (4-2-4). This is an introduction to philosophical and historical issues in art education with an emphasis on alternative venues for teaching art to varied populations. It requires 20 hours on-site observation.     Return to top

Art History

ART 140 The Art of the Comic (4-0-4). This course is a historical survey of the comic from 19th century European caricature to the art of the graphic novel. The course traces  the history and artistic development of the comic in America from its roots, examining its growth in popularity with it's zenith in the mid-20th century, to the post paper world of the internet. The course  also pays particular attention to the part played by artists and writers from Cleveland. The students  use their written and oral communication skills to demonstrate what they have learned. Return to top

ART 150 Introduction to Art History and Appreciation (4-0-4). This is the study of the visual arts from the observer's point of view, with emphasis on the awareness of historical and critical functions.Return to top

ART 252 Introduction to Early Western Art (4-0-4). This course covers the history of Western art and crafts from the prehistoric era through the Middle Ages. Return to top

ART 253 Introduction to Western Art Since 1400 (4-0-4).). This course covers the history of Western art and crafts from the Renaissance to the present. Return to top

ART 253H Introduction to Western Art Since 1400 - Honors (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Honors standing or permission of university Honors Program. This course covers the history of Western art and crafts from the Renaissance to the present. This course focuses upon two major themes. The first is the human figure as it is expressed through various media. The second is the influence of art and science upon each other. Students  complete writing assignments outside of class that demonstrate their ability to analyze and synthesize materials related to the subject matter of the course. Return to top

ART 256 History of Photography (4-0-4).This is a general survey of the history of photography from the middle of the 19th century to the present day. Return to top

ART 281 History of Far Eastern Art (4-0-4).This class covers the history of the art and crafts of China and Japan. Return to top

ART 286 Introduction to African Art (4-0-4).This course covers the history of the art and crafts of Black Africa. Return to top

ART 350 Women in Art (4-0-4). This course is a survey of women's involvement in the western tradition from the Middle Ages to the contemporary world and examines representations of women along with women as patrons and viewers of art and the work of women artists. Return to top

ART 353 Islamic Art (4-0-4). This is a survey of Islamic art from the period of the early caliphates (c. 700) to the heights of the Islamic empires (c. 1700), combined with close examinations of the issue of aniconism in the Islamic artistic tradition and of relationships between the Islamic and western traditions. Return to top

ART 354 Medieval Art (4-0-4)This is a survey of Western art from the late Roman Empire (c. 300) through the late Middle Ages (c. 1400), including architecture, manuscript illumination, metalwork, sculpture, and textile production. The focus of the course is on the interactions of artworks and audiences in producing meaning within specific historical circumstances. Return to top

ART 356 Gothic Art (4-0-4).This course covers the history of the art and crafts of Western Europe in the later Middle Ages. Return to top

ART 363 The Early Renaissance in Italy (4-0-4).This course covers the history of art and architecture in Italy from the rise of the city-state to the voyages of Christopher Columbus, from Giotto to Leonardo da Vinci.Return to top

ART 364 The High Renaissance and Mannerism in Italy (4-0-4).This course covers the history of art and architecture in Italy during the time of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and their followers. Return to top

ART 365 The Renaissance in Northern Europe (4-0-4).This course covers the history of art in the court of the dukes of Flanders and of the Kings of France, from Pucelle to Bruegel.Return to top

ART 370 American Visual Culture (4-0-4).This course is a consideration of American visual culture from the late 19th through the 20th centuries, focusing on the interrelationship between artists and/or movement in traditional art media with the visual forms of American popular and mass culture. These widely divergent forms of visual culture are  considered within their appropriate social and political contexts. Return to top

ART 371 Art in the 19th Century (4-0-4).This course is a survey of the major social and artistic developments of the 19th century across several national cultures - France, Germany, England, the United States, Italy - focusing on particular themes including romanticism and landscape painting; the deterioration of the distinction between "high" and "low" art forms; the transformation of Paris into the first modem metropolis; and the place of women, the "Orient," and the "primitive" within 19th-century art and society. Return to top

ART 372 Art in the 20th Century (4-0-4). This class is the survey of 20th-century modernism and visual culture in its historical context, focusing on particular national cultures - France, the United States, Mexico, Soviet Russia, Germany, Holland, Italy, England - and themes including the concept of the avant-garde, the place of the gendered body, the development of differing modes of abstraction, art censorship from fascism to the present, the role of photography and mechanization, and the rise of the postmodern. Return to top

ART 373 On the Edge: Art Since 1968 (4-0-4). This is the study of international directions in visual culture since 1968 with emphasis on the development of new media forms such as performance, conceptualism, video, film, installation, and the expansion of older ones such as photography. New contexts for exhibition and the increasing importance of race, class, gender, and sexual identity within a global culture are also discussed. Return to top

ART 374 American Architecture (4-0-4). This is an historical analysis of the built environment from the 17th century to the present. Various styles and types of buildings are related to time and place, defining and identifying central characteristics, social function, cultural expression, technology, and changes in architectural practice. It is cross-listed with UST 374. Return to top

ART 375 Cities and Planning (4-0-4). This course covers what man has done to form his communal environment since ancient times; social, symbolic, functional, biotechnical domains as generators of architecture and urban planning; value systems in environmental change; policies, plans, and design proposals as the record of the humanized environment. It is an Urban Studies course. It is cross-listed with UST 375. Return to top

ART 376 Architectural History: Great Monuments of Western Architecture in the Urban Context (4-0-4).This is an inquiry into the forms and meaning of architecture from antiquity to the present.Return to top

ART 380 Art of China (4-0-4). This course explores the art and visual culture of China (including mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan). The political, religious, social, and visual aspects of the art will be stressed in class. In order to understand Chinese art and civilization, students examine art objects from terra-cotta pottery of the Neolithic period, bronze vessels, Buddhist murals and sculptures of the Tang era, literati paintings and imperial tastes of medieval China up to contemporary art.Return to top

ART 383 Indian Art (4-0-4).This course covers the history of Indian art from the neolithic period through the late medieval period. Return to top

ART 384 Buddhist Sculpture (4-0-4).This course is an in-depth study of Buddhist sculpture in India and its spread to Tibet, China and Japan with special emphasis on iconography and stylistic development.Return to top

ART 385 The Hindu Temple (4-0-4). This course is a historical study of the development of the Hindu temple beginning with the simple flat-roofed Gupta structure and culminating with the multi-structured temple complexes of the 17th and18th centuries. Architectural form and iconographical program are equally stressed as well as Indo-Aryan (northern) and Dravidian (southern) styles of temple construction. Return to top

ART 386 Regional Art in Africa (4-0-4). This course examines the historical arts of a selected region of Africa from the archaeological past to contemporary movements. The course may be repeated for credit when the treated region changes. The changing areas to be treated are Western Sudan, Upper Guinea Coast, Lower Guinea Coast, Central Africa, and South and East Africa. It may be repeated for credit. Return to top

ART 388 African-American Art (4-0-4).). The course covers the history of African-American art from Colonial times to the present. Return to top

ART 390 Internship (1 to 8 credit hours).Prerequisite: Written permission of supervising instructor. This is an independent learning experience involving theory and practice in a specific area of art, such as art education, art conservation, museology, and graphic or product design. Approved internships are usually with an external museum or an appropriate institution or commercial enterprise. Grading is on an S/U basis. This course cannot be substituted for other art courses in the degree requirements. Return to top

ART 394 History of Japanese Art (4-0-4).This course is a historical survey of Japanese painting, sculpture, ceramics, functional arts, and architecture from the prehistoric era to the Meiji period. It introduces students to Japanese art and culture through slide lectures, individual research projects, and group research online.Return to top

ART 475 Cleveland: Form and Development of an Urban Environment (4-0-4).This is a workshop which examines aspects of visual communication relative to the city. It is an Urban Studies course. It is cross-listed with UST 475. Return to top

ART 485 Art History: Theory and Methods (4-0-4). Prerequisites: One introductory Art History course (ART 252, 253, 256, 281, or 286) and one 300 or 400 level Art History course. This course is an examination of the various investigative and interpretive methods used by art historians. The course is divided into two parts; the first on traditional methodologies along with their contemporary critiques and the second on a range of "new" art histories. At the end of the course students are both competent in traditional methodologies and cognizant of contemporary debates within art history as a discipline. Return to top

ART 495 Art Seminar (4-0-4).Prerequisite: Written permission of instructor. This is a close examination of a topic to be selected jointly by instructor and students through research and discussion, with emphasis on artists at work in their milieu. It may be repeated for credit.Return to top

ART 497 Independent Reading and Research: Art History (1 to 4 credit hours).Prerequisite: Written permission of instructor. This is a study of a topic of special interest to the particular student; subject and plan of study to be decided jointly by student and instructor. It may be repeated for credit. Return to top

ART 499 Honors Thesis (4 to 8 credit hours).). Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program. This involves directed research under supervision, culminating in the writing of a thesis required of honors students in art history and art education. Return to top

Return to top

 

engaged learning

Mailing Address
Office of Undergraduate Studies
Cleveland State University
2121 Euclid Avenue, MC 107A
Cleveland, OH 44115-2214
This site contains files that require the free Adobe Reader to view.