Sustainability

Courses in Sustainability

Here you will find a wide selection of coursework in many fields related to sustainability. Each course provides insight into one or more aspects of sustainability. To view courses offered during Summer Semester, visit CampusNet.

Undergraduate Course Offerings

BIOLOGY

BIO 100 The Living World (3-0-3). An introduction to the biology of all major groups of living things, including microbial, unicellular, and parasitic organisms, as well as multicellular plants, animals, and fungi. The fundamental concepts of evolutionary and functional biology will be introduced through a systematic survey of the varieties of life.

BIO 106 Human Biology in Health and Disease (3-0-3). Introduction to biological principles. Discussion of cell structure, cell function, and physiology of digestion, circulation, excretion, and coordination in normal and disease states.

BIO 108 Environmental Ecology (3-0-3). Concepts of ecology as they relate to environmental problems in today's world.

BIO 109 Biological Diversity Laboratory (0-2-1). Laboratory study of past and present biological diversity, the importance and value of diversity, and the threats posed by human populations to the maintenance of biological diversity.

BIO 110 Plants and Civilization (3-0-3). The nature and uses of plants; the effects of plants on civilization and vice versa.

BIO 130 Biology of Human Diversity (3-0-3). The purpose of this course is to provide a scientific consideration of the validity of the concept of human races. Sufficient background information in biology will be introduced to cover the essential ideas involved in measuring human biological diversity.

BIO 200 Introductory Biology I (3-0-3). An introduction to modern biology covering basic principles of molecular and cell biology, immunity, genetics, evolution, and biological classification.

BIO 202 Introductory Biology II (3-0-3). An introduction to modern biology including a survey of biological diversity, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, principles of ecology, and human impact on ecosystems.

BIO 270 Human Nutrition (3-0-3). An introduction to human nutrition, including nutritional requirements throughout life, nutrient value, metabolic requirements, nutrition and disease, malnutrition and undernourishment, dieting supplements, and dietary fads.

BIO 300 Plant Biology (3-0-3). Plant diversity, structure, function, and evolution.

BIO 302 Animal Biology (3-0-3). Animal diversity, structure, function, and evolution.

BIO 304 Population Biology and Evolution (3-0-3). Population genetics, evolutionary processes, population ecology, and biogeography.

BIO 450 Evolutionary Biology (3-0-3). Advanced lectures on evolution that consider traits, genes, and their interaction with environmental variation. Topics include the basic quantitative methods required to interpret evolutionary change, the consequences of population structure, molecular approaches to phylogenetic studies, and the changes in genetic variation under different models of selection, drift, migration, and mutation.

BIO 452 Marine Ecology (3-0-3). An advanced ecology course that encompasses marine biology, ecological adaptations of organisms to the marine environment, and interspecific interactions. This course will cover marine habitats and the specializations of organisms that live in them.

BIO 454 Ecology (2-0-2). Study of interactions of organisms with their environment, including growth and regulation of populations, energetics of organisms and ecosystems, life-history evolution, and community ecology.

BIO 472 Wetland Ecology (3-2-4). A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components of wetland ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in wetland ecosystems and community interactions are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and analyses used in wetland ecology. Techniques in wetland characterization and delineation are covered.

BIO 474 Stream Ecology (3-2-4). A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components in stream ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in aquatic environments, community interactions, and ecosystem energetics are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and stream ecosystem analyses. Techniques in stream habitat and water quality assessment are covered.

BIO 476 Plant Biochemistry (3-0-3). Basic physiological processes in plants; photosynthesis, uptake of nutrients, respiration, growth, and the role of hormones and enzymes involved in these processes.

BLACK STUDIES

BST 200 Introduction to Black Studies (4-0-4). Introduction to Black Studies is designed to serve as the foundational course for those interested in pursuing the Black Studies major or minor. The theoretical and applied foundations of the Black Studies discipline are presented and explored. The course will introduce the student to the discipline's founders. The course will follow the development of the discipline from its origins to its current state.

CHEMISTRY

CHM 151 Chemistry Around Us (3-0-3). Study of chemical thought from alchemy to chemistry, and how it affects our lives from the kitchen to the nuclear power plant.

CHM 251 College Chemistry I (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one unit high-school algebra. Introduction to chemistry, including fundamental concepts, tools and techniques; matter and energy; atomic structure; chemical bonds and reactions; equilibrium and the gas laws; applications to daily life, industry and life processes.

CHM 255 Principles of Environmental Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one-unit high-school algebra. Study of natural and polluted environmental processes through chemical concepts and principles.

CHM 261 General Chemistry I (4-0-4). Stoichiometry, atomic theory, states of matter, electronic structure, oxidation-reduction, and thermodynamics.

CHM 331 Organic Chemistry I (4-0-4). Modern presentation of organic chemistry stressing theory and mechanism; extensive use of resonance and conformational analysis; and alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, alkenes, alkynes, and stereochemistry.

CHM 402 Biochemistry I (3-0-3). Chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, vitamins and hormones, with major emphasis on biochemical processes in human cells and organs and enzyme kinetics, and energetics of metabolic reactions.

CHM 404 Environmental Chemistry (3-0-3). Chemical aspects of environmental problems including air and water pollution, solid waste, toxic substances, and related topics.

CHM 407 Environmental Toxicology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: one year of natural sciences or permission of instructor. Topics on the impact of environmental pollutants on humans.

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

CVE 211 Surveying (3-2-3). Theory and techniques of horizontal and vertical distance measurement, angle measurement, theory and adjustment of errors, area and traverse calculations, tacheometry, state plane coordinate system, topographic mapping, horizontal and vertical curves, earthwork calculations, fundamentals of engineering graphics, integration of geometrical theory, and computer-aided drawing.

CVE 371 Environmental Engineering I (3-0-3). Introduction to environmental engineering issues, legal aspects, engineering solutions, and basic approaches to abatement system design. Includes water quality, water supply, wastewater treatment systems, air pollution abatement, fate of pollutants, solid wastes, hazardous wastes, hazardous materials management, and environmental impacts.

CVE 442 Urban Transportation Planning (4-0-4). Focus on factors involved in the process of urban planning and regional transportation systems, encompassing all modes. Provides students with theory and applications of urban transportation planning studies, traffic models, investment models, programming and scheduling.

CVE 450 Environmental Technology (3-0-3). Introduction to environmental quality, water resources, wastewater treatment, air pollution, solid and hazardous waste management, waste site remediation. Emphasis on solutions to business, industrial, and manufacturing problems; including site audits, pollution prevention and regulatory issues.

CVE 470 Environmental Chemistry (4-0-4). Theoretical concepts from inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry applied to water chemistry and environmental engineering issues.

CVE 471 Environmental Law, Regulation and Compliance (4-0-4). The study of environmental legislation and the resultant regulations as they apply to the environmental engineering profession. Addresses federal, state, and local regulations as applied to soil, water, air, and multimedia engineering activities.

CVE 472 Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering (4-0-4). Application of the principles of biochemistry and microbiology including microbial metabolic cycles, enzyme systems, inhibitors, and electron transport mechanisms important to the water and wastewater treatment processes.

COMMUNICATION

COM 211 Communicating in Personal Relationships (4-0-4). Examines the fundamental role of communication in establishing and maintaining personal relationships. By surveying the leading research and theories in interpersonal communication, this course will engage students in the detailed analysis of how individuals enter into, maintain, and terminate relationships. Conceptual perspectives examined will include communicative competence, relational development, interaction process, codes, and context.

COM 240 Professional Communication (4-0-4). Course is designed to expose students to the theories, skills, and strategies needed to become effective communicators in business and professional settings. Students who successfully complete the course should be able to 1) recognize and describe the array of specific business/professional situations in which effective communication is expected; 2) understand and explain the responsibilities, expectations, and dynamics of human communication in those business/professional situations: and 3) choose appropriate communication strategies and use effective communication skills in writing and presentation.]

COM 331 Gender and Communication (4-0-4). Explores the relationship of gender to the communication process. Examines issues of power, conflict, sex role stereotypes, and cultural patterns of interaction on interpersonal relationships.

COM 332 Interracial Communication (4-0-4). Applies communication theory to interracial situations, problem-solving in interracial groups, blockages to successful relations between the races, stereotyping, prejudice, and roles.

COM 346 Communication in Organizations (4-0-4). Explores approaches and processes of communication in organizational settings. Specific focus is on structure and function of messages and information dissemination, as well as application of theory.

COM 347 Political Communication (4-0-4). Introduces students to contemporary and historical scholarship of politics, mass media, and public opinion. Examines such issues as the impact of television on elections, the press and the presidency, political advertising, presidential debates, and opinion polling. Explores theories and research on mass media and elections.

COM 348 Intercultural Communication (4-0-4). Analyzes the cultural dimensions of communication with emphasis on interpersonal and social encounters. Examines the cultural foundations of communication behavior, including ethnicity, cultural sensitivity, personal relationships, group processes, verbal and nonverbal communication, and cultural adaptation. Strategies for effective intercultural communication are also discussed.

ECONOMICS

ECN 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (3-0-3). Introductory course in macroeconomic theory: national accounting, levels of output and employment, money supply, government monetary and foreign exchange, and the international monetary system.

ECN 202 Principles of Microeconomics (3-0-3). Introductory course in microeconomic theory: pricing, resource allocation, distribution, current domestic economic problems, international trade, and alternate economic systems.

ECN 316 Comparative Economic Systems (3-0-3). American capitalism compared with socialism, communism, and other planned economies.

ECN 333 Economics of Health Care (4-0-4). Overview of health and the features of medical-care markets; economic analysis of demand for medical care including the role of uncertainty and insurance on demand; supply of medical care and the role of doctors, hospitals and insurance on supply side; organizational form of health-care markets and policy issues in financing and resource allocation; international dimensions of health-care issues.

ECN 350 Economics of Crime and Punishment (4-0-4). Trends in criminal activity, data and data sources; economic impact on society of criminal activity; economic analysis of criminal behavior and the criminal justice system; role of deterrence including certainty and severity of punishment, and economics of victimless crimes with applications in the markets for heroin and cocaine.

ECN 360 Public Sector Economics (4-0-4). Economics of the governmental or public sector in the United States; topics include the economic rationale for government, theory of public choice, public expenditure theory, analysis of selected expenditure programs, taxation theory, analysis of selected taxes and fiscal relations between governments.

ECN 391 Consumer Economics (3-0-3). Money management and consumer choice and protection; budgeting, saving, and borrowing; buying food, clothing, housing, insurance, and investments.

ECN 470 Urban Economics (4-0-4). Theory concerning development and growth of cities; land rent and land use patterns, suburbanization, and control; discussion of urban problems and issues such as poverty and public policy, housing market, discrimination; and local government finance.

ECN 474 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (4-0-4). Using the concepts of public goods and externalities, the causes of environmental problems will be analyzed. Regulatory approaches will be examined as to their impact and efficiency in controlling pollution and congestion. Externality and sustainability issues involving the rate of exploitation of natural resources will be explored. Both positive and normative economic reasoning will be applied to the related issues of population size, economic-ecological interactions, and future prospects for humanity. Cross-listed with ECN 574.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

EVS 206 Introduction to Environmental Science (4-0-4). An introduction to the interlinkages of nature, with substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, anthropology, political sciences and many other areas. The role of humans as destroyers and conservationists in nature will be studied. Natural- and human-caused hazards and prevention will be investigated.

EVS 300 Physical Features of Ecosystems (3-0-3). Overview of the dynamics of the abiotic factors contributing to ecosystem structure and function. The course will include water resources and flood hazards, environmental hazards, soils, and waste management. It will deal both with natural factors and environments that have been affected by human intervention, as well as conservation of the resources on which society depends.

EVS 302 Biological Features of Ecosystems (3-0-3). An introduction to biological features and resources of ecosystems, and their conservation and management.

EVS 450 Applied Ecology (3-0-3). Our lives have been increasingly touched by questions pertaining to environmental degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Students will examine ways in which ecological principles can be applied to solving some of these crucial environmental problems. Topics include global climate change, sustainability, agroforestry, biodiversity and conservation, invasive species, ecotoxicology, biomonitoring and bioremediation, and restoration ecology.

EVS 454 Conservation Biology (3-0-3). This course will examine the causes and scientific responses to the current worldwide crisis of declining biodiversity. Scientific principles underlying conservation biology are emphasized, but students also will explore the role that culture, societal values, politics, and economics play in conservation issues.

EVS 470 Aquatic Ecosystems (3-0-3). A study of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. Commonalities and differences between the physical-chemical and biological components of these ecosystems will be discussed. The impacts of human activities on these ecosystems are covered, as well as water quality assessment techniques, pollution control, and regulation. This course includes three required Saturday field trips.

EVS 472 Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio (2-0-2). Introduction to the study of watersheds.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

ENV 259 Natural History of the Cleveland Area (2-6-4). General geology, ecology, flora, and fauna of the Cleveland area; field trips to parks and museums to study local rock formation, Forest types, and plant and animal identification. Designed primarily for nonscience majors. Cross-listed with UST 259.

ENV 435 Environmental Policy and Administration (4-0-4). Administration of the organizations charged with responding to environmental regulations and/or crises; decision- and policy-making processes within and around these organizations, especially as they are related to conflicting interests and values. Cross-listed with UST 435.

ENV 436 Urban Sustainability (4-0-4). Presents the values, trends and methods of planning for environmentally sustainable cities and regions. Focuses on urban sustainability and built form, including buildings, designed green spaces, urban water systems, energy and economic change. Students become familiar with processes that generate the physical landscape and the impacts of human settlements on natural landscapes. Local, state, and federal laws and regulations relevant to land use and resource protection are featured. Students become familiar with planning methods and their use. Cross-listed with UST 436.

ENV 440 Environment and Human Affairs (4-0-4). Challenges to decision-makers in environmental policy-making; strategies appropriate to various decision situations, analysis of decision-making, negotiation and mediation techniques. Cross-listed with UST 440.

ENV 441 Environmental Planning (4-0-4). Exploration of principles and processes of environmental planning focusing on urban and regional levels; presentation of frameworks and techniques in areas such as site plan review, urban design, urban environmental restoration, open space and habitat preservation, water quality, bioregionalism, and growth management. Cross-listed with UST 441.

ENV 442 Environmental Finance and Capital Budgeting (4-0-4). Introduces students to natural resource economics theory, financial decision-making processes, and public policy relevant to environmental protection, urban sustainability, and natural resource development and management; examination of public goods and pricing theory, public sector involvement, regulation, market solutions, capital planning, and budgeting for environmental infrastructure. Cross-listed with UST 442.

ENV 443 Environmental Regulatory Compliance (4-0-4). Examination of occupational safety and health requirements placed on industry and urban institutions; utilizes training modules that meet federal standards and guidelines.

GEOLOGY

GEO 100 Introductory Geology (3-0-3). Basic instruction concerning the composition of the earth, with a detailed discussion of the physical and chemical processes that bring about its continual evolution.

GEO 106 Introduction to Meteorology (3-0-3). Introduction to weather and weather systems, with a detailed discussion on the nature of the atmosphere, air motions, precipitation, storms, weather patterns, and weather analysis.

GEO 140 Development of Continents and Oceans (3-0-3). Introduction to the structure and history of continents and ocean basins; examination of geological provinces of North America, and the sequence of events through geological time that created and changed the earth.

GEO 150 Geological History of the Earth (3-0-3). Introduction to the history of the earth. Examination of the biochemical and geological evidence for the origin of life and the mechanisms and patterns of evolution, evaluating the most significant events in the evolutionary history of plants and animals through geological time. Introduction to the structure and history of continents and ocean basins, concentrating on the events through geological time that created the North American continent.

GEO 210 The Earth and Human Affairs (3-0-3). Examination of geologic hazards, such as earthquakes, landslides, floods, and shoreline erosion, including class discussion of current events of this type; examination of development of society.

GEO 230 Natural Resources (3-0-3). Examination of our natural resources with emphasis on nonrenewable fossil fuels and mineral resources; discussion of the effect of population growth and technology on rates of consumption, mineral economics, and the concept of "reserves"; the future outlook with regard to alternative sources of energy, substitutes, and recycling.

GEO 323 Geospatial Concepts and Tools (1-4-3). Practicum on environmental geography, concentrating on the information, concepts, and tools we use to visualize and analyze the environment. Basic information sources include maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery. Analytical tools include direct observation and measurement of these sources, as well as an introduction to the use of geographic information systems and image processing for remote sensing. Intended for majors in biology, environmental science, and geology.

GEO 350 Introduction to Oceanography (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Minimum of two science courses. Examination of the interrelated physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes operating in sea water and ocean basins; selected topics relating to the geologic interpretation of the marine rock record, factors regulating growth and environmental habitat of organisms, and the geophysics of ocean basins.

GEO 404 Environmental Science for Teachers (3-0-3). Application of environmental science to the classroom. Substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, and other sciences will be integrated to create a coherent picture of the functioning of the complex systems underpinning the natural world and human society; and the ability for students to understand how society can manage these systems. This course is intended for students working toward school certification. A significant part of the course will be the development of curricular materials based on course content for use in participants' own classes.

GEO 408 Environmental Geology for Teachers (3-0-3). Detailed examination of geologic hazards and the constraints placed by regional geology and geography on the problems facing modern, urban industrial societies. This course is intended for students working toward school certification. A significant part of the course will be the development of curricular materials based on course content for use in participants' own classes.

GEO 425 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (2-4-4). Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and the use of computerized techniques for assessing geographically distributed data. The course will include the use of GIS techniques to analyze data and present those analyses. It will concentrate on the use of satellite imagery and aerial photography, as well as standardized data sets available from commercial sources and the World Wide Web. Laboratory is selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in lecture.

GEO 444 Hydrogeology (3-0-3). Study of the concepts and principles of ground-water flow in rocks, sediments, and soils. The course will deal with flow in both saturated and unsaturated zones, and will include issues related to ground-water use, pollution, and ground-water monitoring both for quality and quantity. Laboratory exercises will cover mathematical and computer solutions to equations and real life situations. Some field work will be required.

NONPROFIT ADMINISTRATION

NAD 453 Managing Urban Diversity (4-0-4). Study of diversity including circumstances faced in urban settings that are exacerbated or affected by diversity factors; exploration of a range of social, political, and economic issues related to diversity. Cross-listed with PSM 453 and UST 453.

PHYSICS

PHY 470 Environmental Physics (4-0-4). Study of physical phenomena underlying a set of current environmental issues. Topics include energy and entropy laws; electromagnetic radiation; forms of energy, including fuels, nuclear, solar; percolation model; chaos theory, including population dynamics, and climate; computer simulations.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3). Introduction to the sociological perspective, forms of social relationships, groups, institutions, and societal organization.

SOC 201 Race, Class and Gender (3-0-3). Survey of major theoretical approaches to race, class and gender; examination of empirical evidence regarding the extent of these kinds of inequality, the ways in which they are produced and reproduced and their consequences. Attempts to overcome the harmful consequences of race, class, and gender inequality, both through the affirmation of identity and difference and through efforts to reduce and/or eliminate these forms of stratification will be reviewed.

SOC 203 Sociology of Poverty (3-0-3). Analysis of the evolution and significance of poverty in the United States, the characteristics of the poor and the experience of poverty, competing explanations for poverty, and evaluation of the impact of social policy on the poor and society as a whole.

SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology of the Third World (3-0-3). Explore the diversity of the Third World by examining the experiences of several specific countries and regions. Will consider the characteristics, problems, and dynamics they have in common. Special attention will be given to the origins of social conflict in the Third World and to the prospects for social change.

SOC 220 Introduction to Globalization (3-0-3). Course offers a preliminary introduction to globalization. This refers to the increasing interconnections between countries. The course has three sections. In the first section, the concept and history of globalization will be discussed. What is globalization? How has it emerged and spread? What are the primary theories about globalization? The second section analyzes the integration of societies into a global economy. What are the roles of trans-national corporations and political organizations? How is information and knowledge created and spread across national borders? How is world population distributed? The third section analyzes the impact of globalization throughout the world. What are the benefits and sources of harm brought about by globalization? How are different parts of the world integrated socially and culturally? Does globalization increase or reduce inequality. How does it affect the well-being of citizens in both developing and developed countries? How is globalization related to environmental problems and energy security?

SOC 305 Urban Sociology (4-0-4). The study of metropolitan development and social life. Examines the role of economic, political, and cultural factors at the global, national, and regional levels. Explores the history of urban sociology and contemporary perspectives. Analyzes the process of social change at the metropolitan level.

SOC 315 Population Problems (4-0-4). Sociological significance of population size, distribution, composition, and density; population and economic development; United States population data in relation to other major countries; programs of family planning; population policies.

SOC 380 Racial and Ethnic Inequality (4-0-4). Historical antecedents and cross-societal comparisons of patterns of dominant and subordinate groupings based upon ethnic, cultural, and racial differentiations; patterns of interaction within and among these groups with special attention to prejudice and discrimination.

URBAN STUDIES

UST 200 Introduction to Urban Studies (4-0-4). Introduction to the study of cities using an interdisciplinary approach that includes history, sociology, planning, public administration and economic development; integration of the field of urban studies with the student's everyday experience.

UST 202 Cleveland: The African-American Experience (4-0-4). Cleveland's political, economic, and racial history as typifying older American industrial cities; origins and dynamics of periods of growth and decline with emphasis on race, housing, and poverty.

UST 259 Natural History of the Cleveland Area (3-6-4). General geology, ecology, flora, and fauna of the Cleveland area; field trips to parks and museums to study local rock formations, forest types, and plant and animal identification. Designed primarily for nonscience majors. Cross-listed with ENV 259.

UST 289 Physical Geography (4-0-4). Discussions of physical environments, stressing relationships to people; study of the surface of the earth, including meteorology, science of weather, and geomorphology, science of landforms.

UST 290 Urban Geography (4-0-4). Social, economic, and political structures operating within cities; geographical definitions, location theories, population densities and migrations, and land-use patterns; identification of issues, problems, and policies related to urban settlements

UST 300 Economics of Policy Analysis (4-0-4). Examination of the economic content of urban and regional policies and administrative issues, including housing and land use, labor markets, income distribution and poverty, education, health care, pollution, municipal finance, and municipal service delivery.

UST 301 Urban Development (4-0-4). Evolution and changing form of the metropolitan region; linkages between cities and their suburbs, and industrial/occupational structure and labor market flows; examination of appropriate public and private sector roles and responsibilities and their associated costs.

UST 302 Contemporary Urban Issues (4-0-4). The physical, social, and economic dimensions of the urban crisis emphasizing minority communities; traditional and non-traditional approaches to problem definition and solution, techniques for understanding and shaping the physical environment, and constraints to problem-solving in urban areas. Cross-listed with PSM 302.

UST 418 Urban Planning (4-0-4). The nature of physical planning and its relationship to social and economic planning; steps in the planning process; levels of planning; preparation and criticism of plans and planning studies.

UST 422 Rebuilding Greater Cleveland (4-0-4). Reviews Cleveland’s past economic history from its vibrant 1920s to the present; introduces students to how and why wealth develops, and the factors leading to a dominant city or region’s decline; through a study of urban and economic development, the course explores strategies for transforming Cleveland and Northeast Ohio in an era of global competition.

UST 424 Distressed People, Distressed Places (4-0-4). Investigates public policy approaches to people-based and place-based strategies that confront the consequences of economic development and transition; analyzes the effectiveness of national, state, and local level responses to poverty and spatial distress; examines the connection between product markets, labor markets (people), and land markets (places); develops skills in the areas of public policy formulation, analysis and evaluation.

UST 435 Environmental Policy and Administration (4-0-4). Administration of the organizations charged with responding to environmental regulations and/or crises; decision- and policy-making processes within and around these organizations, especially as they relate to conflicting interests and values. Cross-listed with ENV 435.

UST 436 Urban Sustainability (4-0-4). Presents the values, trends and methods of planning for environmentally sustainable cities and regions. Focuses on urban sustainability and built form, including buildings, designed green spaces, urban water systems, energy and economic change. Students become familiar with processes that generate the physical landscape and the impact of human settlements on natural landscapes. Local, state, and federal laws and regulations relevant to land use and resource protection are featured. Students become familiar with planning methods and their use. Cross-listed with ENV 436.

UST 440 Environment and Human Affairs (4-0-4). Challenges to decision-makers in environmental policy-making; strategies appropriate to various decision situations, analysis of decision-making; negotiation and mediation techniques. Cross-listed with ENV 440.

UST 441 Environmental Planning (4-0-4). Exploration of principles and processes of environmental planning, focusing on urban, metropolitan and regional levels; presentation of frameworks and techniques in areas such as site-plan review, urban design, urban environmental restoration, open space and habitat preservation, water quality, bioregionalism, and growth management; development of organizing principles for environmentally sustainable metropolitan regions. Cross-listed with ENV 441.

UST 442 Environmental Finance and Capital Budgeting (4-0-4). Introduces students to natural resource economics theory, financial decision-making processes, and public policy relevant to environmental protection, urban sustainability, and natural resource development and management; examination of public goods and pricing theory, public sector involvement, regulation, market solutions, capital planning, and budgeting for environmental infrastructure. Cross-listed with ENV 442

UST 477 Regional Planning (4-0-4). Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the conceptual and practical aspects of regional issues and regional planning; regional planning strategies emphasizing governmental collaboration at the regional level not only to solve regional problems but also to accomplish balanced growth within a metropolitan region. Topics to be explored include sprawl, smart growth, regional planning/regionalism, and case studies of regional collaboration.

WOMEN’S STUDIES

WST 151 Introduction to Women's Studies (4-0-4). The field of women's studies involves the study of women from the perspective of women themselves, and related research and scholarship. The course is a broadly interdisciplinary examination of the roles of women as their status and roles are socially constructed, and as women can determine them to be. There is emphasis upon related changes in gender relations in contemporary society.