Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences (BGES)

Course Description Main Frame

Note: Each course in the listings below is linked to its description. These lists contain all courses offered by the Department of Biological, Geological, and Enviromental Sciences (BGES) and include undergraduate Biology (100-level, 200-level, and 300 & 400-level), graduate Biology (500 & 600-level for Master's degree and 700 & 800-level for Doctoral degree), Environmental Science (undergraduate and Master's level), and Geology (undergraduate only) courses.

Effective Fall Semester, 2000, the course numbers of many BIO and GEO courses were changed; a conversion table that lists old and new course numbers can be seen by clicking here.

BIO100-199 BIO200-299 BIO300-499 BIO500-899 EVS GEO

A asterisk symbol indicates that a recent syllabus for the course is posted and accessible via the course description.


Links to the official online CSU Catalog listings:


BIOLOGY Undergraduate Courses:

Note: The 100-level biology courses are intended primarily for non-science majors. Courses with "Human" in their title discuss biological principles using humans as the main illustrative example.
BIO 107 may be combined with BIO 102, 104, 106, or 168 to partially satisfy the University's requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.
BIO 109 may be combined with BIO 100, 108, 110, or 112 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.

100-level Biology Courses
Course Code Course Title

Credit Hours
lecture-lab-total
Fall/Spring/SUmmer
day/night
even/odd years

BIO 100asterisk The Living World 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 102asterisk Human Genetics, Reproduction and Development 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 104 The Brain 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 106 Human Biology in Health and Disease 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 107 Human Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 108 Environmental Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 109 Biological Diversity Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 110 Plants and Civilization 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 112 Biology of the Dinosaurs 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 130 Biology of Human Diversity 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 168 Biology of Aging 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 171 Summer Local Flora 2 - 4 - 4
BIO 173 Spring Local Flora 2 - 4 - 4
BIO 194 Special Topics in Biology var 1-6

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Note: Courses numbered 200 and above are intended primarily for Biology majors, Health Science majors, Nursing majors, and other science majors. Courses numbered 260 to 272 do not fulfill the requirements for any biology major, but they do fulfill requirements for the biology minor.

200-level Biology Courses
Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
(lecture-lab-total)
BIO 200 Introductory Biology I 3 - 0 - 3 Fdn/Sd/SU1
BIO 201 Introductory Biology Laboratory I 0 - 2 - 1 F/S/SU1
BIO 202 Introductory Biology II 3 - 0 - 3 Sdn/SU2
BIO 203 Introductory Biology Laboratory II 0 - 2 - 1 S/SU2
BIO 260 Human Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 264asterisk Introductory Microbiology 3 - 0 - 3 Sd/SU1
BIO 265 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 Sd/SU1
BIO 266 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (GenEd08 Nat. Sci. with BIO 267) 3 - 0 - 3 Fdn/SU1
BIO 267 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 F/SU1
BIO 268 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (GenEd08 Nat. Sci. with BIO 269) 3 - 0 - 3 Sdn/SU2
BIO 269 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 S/SU2
BIO 270 Human Nutrition 3 - 0 - 3

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Note: All 300-level biology courses have prerequisites of 200-level courses. 300-level courses cover specific areas of biology in greater depth than they are covered in 200-level courses. With few exceptions 400-level biology courses have 300-level courses as prerequisites. 400-level courses cover a specific topic in great depth.

BIO300- and 400-level Biology Courses
Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
(lecture-lab-total)
BIO 300 Plant Biology 3 - 0 - 3 Fd
BIO 301 Plant Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 F
BIO 302 Animal Biology 3 - 0 - 3 Fn(o)/SUo
BIO 303 Animal Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 F/SUo
BIO 304 Population Biology and Evolution 3 - 0 - 3 Sn(o)
BIO 305 Population Biology and Evolution Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 306asterisk Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 4 - 0 - 4 Sn(e)/Su(o)
BIO 308asterisk Cell Biology

3 - 0 - 3

F(ne)/SU(o)

BIO 309 Cell Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 310 Genetics 3 - 0 - 3 S(no)
BIO 311 Genetics Recitation 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 380 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers 3 - 4 - 5
BIO 390 Writing in Biology I (WAC) 2 - 0 - 2
BIO 391 Writing in Biology II (WAC) 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 400 Medical Technology Orientation 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 401 Urban Service Learning in Biology 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 408 Animal Cell Culture 2 - 2 - 3 S
BIO 410 Theory and Practice of Light Microscopy 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 411 Theory and Practice of Light Microscopy Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 412 Elements of Immunology 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 413 Elements of Immunology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 414 Parasitology 2 - 0 - 2 S
BIO 415 Parasitology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 416 Microbiology 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 417 Microbiology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 418 Histology 3 - 0 - 3 So
BIO 419 Histology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 420 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 2 - 0 - 2
BIO 421 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 422 Mammalian Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 423 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 424 Principles of Animal Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 425 Principles of Animal Physiology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 426 Neurobiology 3 - 0 - 3 Fe
BIO 427 Neurobiology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 428 Endocrinology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 430 Bioinformatics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 432 Molecular Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 435 Techniques in Molecular Biology 1 - 6 - 4
BIO 436 Evolutionary Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 438 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 450 Evolutionary Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 452 Urban Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 453 Field Experience in Ecology and Conservation Biology variable: 1 to 6
BIO 454 Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 455 Ecology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 456 Vertebrate Biology and Evolution 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 458 Behavior 3 - 0 - 3 Fo
BIO 460 Vertebrate Embryology - to be deleted 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 464 Developmental Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 465 Developmental Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 468 Theories of Aging 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 471 Summer Local Flora 2 - 4 - 4
BIO 472 Wetland Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 473 Spring Local Flora 2 - 4 - 4
BIO 474 Stream Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 476 Plant Biochemistry 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 477 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 478 Morphology of Angiosperms 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 479 Morphology of Angiosperms Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 490 Honors Research variable: 1 or 2
BIO 491 Honors Thesis and Defense--proposed WAC - to become Honors Research 3 - 0 - 3 to become 1 or 2
BIO 492 Honors Thesis and Defense (WAC) var 1-2
BIO 493 Special Topics in Biology - to be deleted/replaced with a lab version 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 494 Special Topics in Biology variable: 1 - 6
BIO 495 Seminar (SPAC & BS BIO&BIT Capstone) 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 496 Independent Study in Biology variable: 1-6
BIO 497 Independent Research in Biology --proposed variable: 1-6
BIO 499 Exit Evaluation 0 - 1 - 0
1

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BIOLOGY Graduate Courses:

Note: Courses numbered 500-600 are for students seeking the M.S. degree. Courses numbered 700-800 are for students seeking the Ph.D. degree who already have an M.S. degree or equivalent credit hours. Students enrolled in 700-800 courses are expected to make more substantial contributions to papers, presentations, projects, etc., and will be graded more stringently than students in 500-600 versions.

BIO Graduate Courses: BIO500-899
Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
(lecture-lab-total)
BIO 500 / 700 Graduate Orientation 1 - 0 - 1 F
BIO 502 / 702 Graduate Orientation 1 - 0 - 1 S
BIO 504 / 704 Biological Chemistry 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 508 Animal Cell Culture 2 - 2 - 3
BIO 510 / 710 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 511 / 711 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 512 / 712 Immunology 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 513 / 713 Immunology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1 F
BIO 514 / 714 Parasitology 2 - 0 - 2 S
BIO 515 / 715 Parasitology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 516 / 716 Microbiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 517 / 717 Microbiology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 518 / 718 Histology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 519 / 719 Histology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 520 Explorations in Biology: Inquiry-Based Investigations of Urban Ecosystems 1 - 2 - 2
BIO 522 / 722 Mammalian Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 523 / 723 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 526 / 726 Neurobiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 527 / 727 Neurobiology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 528 / 728 Endocrinology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 530 / 730 Bioinformatics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 534 / 734 Elements of Pharmacology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 535 / 735 Techniques in Molecular Biology 1 - 6 - 4
BIO 536 / 736 Evolutionary Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 538 / 738 Clinical Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 540 / 740 Biostatistics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 542 / 742 Morphometrics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 548 Biogeography 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 550 / 750 Evolutionary Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 552 Urban Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 554 / 754 Ecology 3 - 4 - 5
BIO 555 / 755 Ecology Laboratory 0 - 3 - 1
BIO 558 / 758 Behavior 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 562 / 762 Evolutionary Ecology of Sexual Reproduction 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 564 / 764 Developmental Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 565 / 765 Developmental Biology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 570 / 770 Protozoology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 571 / 771 Protozoology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 572/772 Wetland Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 574/774 Stream Ecology 3 - 2 - 4
BIO 576 / 776 Plant Biochemistry 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 577 / 777 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 578 / 778 Morphology of Flowering Plants 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 579 / 779 Morphology of Flowering Plants Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
BIO 580 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers 3 - 4 - 5
BIO 584 / 784 Writing and Editing Grant Proposals 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 585/785 Practical Grant Writing 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 588 Museum Studies in Natural History 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 593 Special Topics in Biology, with Lab variable 1-5
BIO 594 Special Topics in Biology variable 1-6
BIO 595 Environmental Seminar 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 596 Independent Study in Biology variable 1-6
BIO 597 Independent Research in Biology variable 1-6
BIO 602 / 802 Enzymology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 604 / 804 Cell Biology 3 - 0 - 3 F
BIO 608 /808 Pharmacodynamics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 610 / 810 Molecular Biology and Genetics 3 - 0 - 3 S
BIO 612 / 812 Microbial Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 616 / 816 Proliferative Signal Transduction 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 622 / 822 Advanced Vertebrate Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 624 / 824 Foundations of Biomedical Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 630 / 830 Recombinant DNA Techniques 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 632 / 832 Population Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 634 / 834asterisk Developmental Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 638 / 838 Advances in Cell Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 640 / 840 Molecular Evolutionary Genetics 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 651 / 851 Advanced Research in Field Biology 0 - 6 - 3
BIO 653 / 853 Advanced Research in Field Biology 0 - 8 - 4
BIO 656 / 856 Environmental Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 670 / 870 Advances in Biology 2 - 0 - 2
BIO 672 / 872 Advances in Molecular Biology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 674 / 874 Advances in Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 676 / 876 Advances in Physiology 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 678 / 878 Advances in Evolution 3 - 0 - 3
BIO 684 / 884 Research Seminar 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 688 Graduate Seminar (M.S.) 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 690 Qualifying Examination (M.S.) 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 691 M.S. Research variable: 1 to10
BIO 693 Graduate Project (M.S.) 0 - 4 - 2
BIO 694 Graduate Project (M.S.) 0 - 6 - 3
BIO 695 M.S. Thesis Research variable: 1 to10
BIO 888 Ph.D. Seminar 1 - 0 - 1
BIO 891 Ph.D. Research variable: 1 to10
BIO 895 Ph.D. Dissertation Research variable: 1 to10

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Courses (undergraduate & graduate):

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
(lecture-lab-total)
EVS 206 Introduction to Environmental Science 4 - 0 - 4
EVS 300 Physical features of ecosystems 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 301 Physical features of ecosystems lab 0 - 2 - 1
EVS 302 Biological features of ecosystems 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 303 Biological features of ecosystems lab 0 - 2 - 1
EVS 380 Earth System Science for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 390 Writing in Environmental Science I (WAC) 2 - 0 - 2
EVS 391 Writing in Environmental Science II-proposed 1 - 0 - 1
EVS 450 Applied Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 454 Conservation Biology 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 455 Conservation Biology Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
EVS 470 Aquatic Ecosystems 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 471 Aquatic Ecosystems laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
EVS 472 Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio 2 - 0 - 2
EVS 473 Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
EVS 490 Internship in Environmental Science 0 - 8 - 4
EVS 491 Honors Research 1 or 2
EVS 492 Honors Thesis and Defense (WAC) 1 - 0 - 1
EVS 493 Topics in Environmental Science 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 494 Topics in Environmental Science 4 - 0 - 4
EVS 496 Independent Study in Environmental Science 0 - 8 - 4
EVS 497 Independent Research in Environmental Science 0 - 8 - 4
EVS 506 Ecosystem Science 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 510 Environmental Geology for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 512 Geological History of the Cleveland Area for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 514 Ecosystem Science for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 520 Rivers and Watersheds of Northeast Ohio 2 - 0 - 2
EVS 521 Rivers and Watersheds Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
EVS 523 Map Interpretation and the Visualization of Space 1 - 4 - 3
EVS 525 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing 2 - 4 - 4
EVS 527 Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing and GIS 1 - 6 - 4
EVS 550 Applied Ecology 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 560 Geomorphology 3 - 2 - 4
EVS 570 Aquatic Ecosystems 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 571 Aquatic Ecosystems laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
EVS 580 Earth System Science for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 581 OhioView Prerequsite Remote Sensing
EVS 582 OhioView Introduction Remote Sensing
EVS 585 OhioView Advanced Remote Sensing
EVS 588 OhioView Research in Remote Sensing
EVS 593 Special Topics in Environmental Science, with Lab variable 1-5
EVS 594 Topics in Environmental Science variable 1-6
EVS 596 Independent Study in Environmental Science variable 1-6
EVS 597 Independent Research in Environmental Science variable 1-6
EVS 680 Issues in Environmental Science 3 - 0 - 3
EVS 690 Non-Thesis M.S. Exit Project 1 - 0 - 1
EVS 691 M.S. Research in Environmental Science variable: 1 to 12
EVS 695 M.S. Thesis Research in Environmental Science variable: 1 to12

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GEOLOGY Courses:

Course Code Course Title Credit Hours
(lecture-lab-total)
GEO 100 Introductory Geology 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 101 Introductory Geology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
GEO 106 Introduction to Meteorology 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 124 Beyond Google Earth 3 - 1 - 4
GEO 140 Development of Continents and Oceans 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 150 Geological History of the Earth 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 151 Geological History of the Earth Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
GEO 170 Origin and History of Life 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 204 Mineralogy 3 - 2 - 4 F
GEO 206 Petrology 3 - 2 - 4 S
GEO 210 The Earth and Human Affairs 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 230 Natural Resources 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 293 Special Topics in Geology variable: 1 to 4
GEO 302 Paleobiology 3 - 2 - 4 S
GEO 312 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 313 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
GEO 314 Paleoecology 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 320 Structural Geology 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 321 Structural Geology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
GEO 323 Geospatial Tools and Concepts 1 - 4 - 3
GEO 350 Introduction to Oceanography 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 354 Geochemistry 4 - 0 - 4
GEO 358 Field Geology of the Cleveland Area 2 - 0 - 2
GEO 359 Field Geology of the Cleveland Area Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
GEO 390 Writing in Geology I (WAC) 2 - 0 - 2
GEO 404 Environmental Science for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 408 Environmental Geology for Teachers 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 410 Geological History of the Cleveland Area 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 420 Rivers and Watersheds of Northeast Ohio 2 - 0 - 2
GEO 421 Rivers and Watersheds Laboratory 0 - 4 - 2
GEO 425 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing 2 - 4 - 4
GEO 427 Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing 1 - 6 - 4
GEO 444 Hydrogeology 3 - 0 - 3
GEO 445 Hydrogeology Laboratory 0 - 2 - 1
GEO 451 Field Geology variable: 4 to 8
GEO 460 Geomorphology (WAC) 3 - 2 - 4
GEO 490 Internship in Geology variable: 1 to 4
GEO 493 Special Topics in Geology, with Lab variable: 1 to 4
GEO 496 Independent Study in Geology variable: 1 to 4
GEO 497 Research in Geology variable: 1 to 8

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Course Descriptions:

Note: The 100-level biology courses are intended primarily for non-science majors. Courses with "Human" in their title discuss biological principles using humans as the main illustrative example.
BIO 107 may be combined with BIO 102, 104, 106, or 168 to partially satisfy the University's requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.
BIO 109 may be combined with BIO 100, 108, 110, or 112 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.

BIO 100 The Living World (3-0-3). An introduction to the biology of all major groups of living things, including microbial, unicellular, and parasitic organisms, as well as multicellular plants, animals and fungi. The fundamental concepts of evolutionary and functional biology will be introduced through a systematic survey of the varieties of life. Natural Science. BIO 109 may be combined with BIO 100 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory. GenEd08

BIO 102 Human Genetics, Reproduction, and Development (3-0-3). Genetics and development of humans including application of genetic technology to humans. Natural Science. BIO 107 may be combined with BIO 102 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.GenEd08

BIO 104 The Brain (3-0-3). Introduction to the nervous system and the brain. Discussion of the function of brain cells, sensory systems, motor systems and higher functioning in mammalian systems. Normal and abnormal functions of the human brain are emphasized. GenEd08Natural Science.

BIO 106 Human Biology in Health and Disease (3-0-3). Introduction to biological principles. Discussion of cell structure, cell function, and physiology of digestion, circulation, excretion, and coordination in normal and disease states. Natural Science. BIO 107 may be combined with BIO 106 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.GenEd08

BIO 107 Human Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Laboratory study of diverse aspects of human biology. Topics include cell structure and function, human anatomy, physiology, disease, genetics, reproduction, development, and aging.Natural Science with Laboratory.GenEd08

BIO 108 Environmental Ecology (3-0-3). Concepts of ecology as they relate to environmental problems in today's world. Natural Science. BIO 109 may be combined with BIO 108 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.GenEd08

BIO 109 Biological Diversity Laboratory (0-2-1). Laboratory study of past and present biological diversity, the importance and value of diversity, and the threats posed by human populations to the maintenance of biological diversity. Natural Science with Laboratory.

BIO 110 Plants and Civilization (3-0-3). The nature and uses of plants; the effects of plants on civilization and vice versa. Natural Science. BIO 109 may be combined with BIO 110 to partially satisfy the requirement for Natural Science with Laboratory.

BIO 112 Biology of the Dinosaurs (3-0-3). Dinosaurs are used to illustrate fundamental concepts of biology. Topics to be discussed will include methods of classification, evolutionary mechanisms including extinction, the process of fossilization, a survey of major dinosaur groups, and biological principles of biomechanics, physiology, and behavior. Current theories and controversies concerning dinosaur biology will be evaluated. One or two class meetings will be held at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

BIO 130 Biology of Human Diversity (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Completion of General Education requirements in the areas of English Composition and of Mathematics and Logic. The purpose of this course is to provide a scientific consideration of the validity of the concept of human races. Sufficient background information in biology will be introduced to cover the essential ideas involved in measuring human biological diversity. All students must write an 8- to 12-page research paper on some scientific aspect of human biological variation.

BIO 168 Biology of Aging (3-0-3). The various biological theories of aging, together with a review of the fundamental concepts of cell biology and physiology on which these concepts are based.

BIO 171 Summer Local Flora (2-4-4). Study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in summer. Lecture, laboratory, and field work.

BIO 173 Spring Local Flora (2-4-4). Study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in spring. Lecture, laboratory, and field work.

BIO 194 Special Topics in Biology (var 1-6). Study of a particular topic in biology. Topics to be announced in the course schedule each semester. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

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Note: Courses numbered 200 and above are intended primarily for Biology majors, Health Science majors, Nursing majors, and other science majors. Courses numbered 260 to 272 do not fulfill the requirements for any Biology major, but may be used for the Biology minor.

BIO 200 Introductory Biology I (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 201. An introduction to modern biology covering basic principles of molecular and cell biology, immunity, genetics, evolution, and biological classification. Natural Science.

BIO 201 Introductory Biology Laboratory I (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 200. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 200. Natural Science Laboratory.

BIO 202 Introductory Biology II (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 200. Corequisite: BIO 203. An introduction to modern biology including a survey of biological diversity, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, principles of ecology, and human impact on ecosystems. Natural Science.

BIO 203 Introductory Biology Laboratory II (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 202. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 202. Natural Science Laboratory.

BIO 260 Human Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 200. Discussion of basic Mendelian and biochemical genetics with emphasis on chromosomal and molecular disorders.

BIO 264 Introductory Microbiology(3-0-3). Prerequisite: Upper-level high school biology or BI0 101. Corequisite: BIO 265. Principles of microbiology, and immunology, including pathogenic microorganisms, and viruses. .

BIO 265 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 264. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 264. Natural Science Laboratory.

BIO 266 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Upper-level high school biology, or BIO 101 or BIO 200, or HED 210. Corequisite: BIO 267. Systems approach to human anatomy and physiology. Natural Science.GenEd08 from Fall 2011

BIO 267 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 266. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 266. Natural Science Laboratory. Natural Science.GenEd08 from Fall 2011

BIO 268 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 266. Corequisite BIO 269. Continuation of BIO 266. Systems approach to human anatomy and physiology. Natural Science.GenEd08 from Fall 2011

BIO 269 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 268. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 268. Natural Science Laboratory. Natural Science.GenEd08 from Fall 2011

BIO 270 Human Nutrition (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 101, or 200, or 268. An introduction to human nutrition, including nutritional requirements throughout life, nutrient value, metabolic requirements, nutrition and disease, malnutrition and undernourishment, dieting supplements, and dietary fads. Natural Science.

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BIO 300 Plant Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and 202. Corequisite: BIO 301. Plant diversity, structure, function, and evolution.

BIO 301 Plant Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 300. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 300.

BIO 302 Animal Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and 202. Corequisite: BIO 303. Animal diversity, structure, function, and evolution.

BIO 303 Animal Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 302. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 302.

BIO 304 Population Biology and Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and 202. Corequisite: BIO 305. Population genetics, evolutionary processes, population ecology, and biogeography.

BIO 305 Population Biology and Evolution Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 304. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 304.

BIO 306 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (4-0-4). Prerequisites: BIO 200, 202, and CHM 331. Discussion of the essential concepts underlying biochemistry. Topics include chemical concepts, structure of biological molecules, catalysis, metabolic regulation, and molecular genetics.

BIO 308 Cell Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 306. Structure, function, and biogenesis of cellular organelles and the cytoskeleton. Discussions of development at the cellular level, inter- and intra-cellular signaling, and regulation of the cell cycle.

BIO 309 Cell Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 308. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 308.

BIO 380 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5). Enrollment is restricted to students seeking middle school licensure. No credit towards biology major or minor. Biological concepts relevant to students seeking middle school licensure will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.

BIO 310 Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200 and BIO 202, or permission of instructor. Principles of transmission and molecular genetics in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, with emphasis on classical and molecular analysis techniques and their interpretation.

BIO 311 Genetics Recitation (0-2-1). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 310 or permission of instructor. Problem solving, demonstrations, and special projects with emphasis on databases and Web tools for genetic and bioinformatic analyses.

BIO 390 Writing in Biology (2-0-2). This course is designed to develop the writing and oral presentation skills of students through assigned projects and in-class activities. Students will write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. WAC.

BIO 391 Writing in Biology (1-0-1). Students will write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format and give in-class oral presentations. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. Students must be concurrently enrolled in a 300- or 400-level content-based biology course. Prior to registering for BIO 391 students must obtain a written agreement from the content course instructor indicating willingness to serve as a grader of the required written report. The content course instructor, in consultation with the student, will determine the topic of the written report. May be repeated with change in title of the content course. WAC.

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BIO 400 Orientation for MedicalTechnology Students (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Admission to the Medical Technology Program. Pre-clinical orientation; general aspects of the hospital training program; concept of the medical technologist as a member of the health-care delivery team; lectures by education coordinators of hospital schools; visits to hospital clinical laboratories.

BIO 401 Urban School Service Learning in Biology (0 - 2 - 1). Prerequisite: Major in Biology and at least two Biology courses at the 300 level. Permission of Biology advisor. A service learning field course that involves assisting science teachers at a designated urban middle or high school for two hours per week. Requires a brief, reflective paper on the experience. May be taken twice for credit.

BIO 408 Animal Cell Culture (2-2-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Theoretical and practical indroduction to methods of animal cell culture necessary for research in biomedical or biotech labs and in the pharmaceutical industry. Techniques will include choice of medium, passaging, freezing, test of purity and viability, stable and transient transduction, and preparing primary cultures.

BIO 410 Theory and Practice of Light Microscopy (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 411. Consideration of diverse theoretical and practical aspects of the light microscope. .

BIO 411 Theory and Practice of Light Microscopy Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite 410. Laboratory exercises and projects undertaken outside of scheduled class time provide practical experience with various uses of the light microscope.

BIO 412 Elements of Immunology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 308 and 416/417. Corequisite BIO 413. Nature of antigens, antibody structure and function, B and T cell activation, cytokines, immunoassays, terminology.

BIO 413 Elements of Immunology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite BIO 412. Immunochemical assays and cell culture techniques. Preparation of single cell suspensions and determination of cell viability. Identification and quantification of antigen-antibody interactions.

BIO 414 Parasitology (2-0-2). Prerequisite: BIO 302. Corequisite: BIO 415. A basic course primarily designed for biology majors who desire an understanding of animal parasitology, including ecology, life histories, host-parasite relationships.

BIO 415 Parasitology Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 414. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 414.

BIO 416 Microbiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: B10 308. Corequisite: BIO 417. Structure, function, and genetics of major groups of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria; the role of microbes in the economy of nature and man.

BIO 417 Microbiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 416. The techniques of identification, manipulation, and quantification of microbes.

BIO 418 Histology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Corequisite: BIO 419. Structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs, with emphasis on relationships of structure and function.

BIO 419 Histology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 418. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 418.

BIO 420 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (2-0-2). Prerequisite: BIO 302. Corequisite: BIO 421. Comparative study of gross structure and evolutionary development of vertebrate organ systems.

BIO 421 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 420. Detailed dissections of representative vertebrate specimens.

BIO 422 Mammalian Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 200, 202, and chemistry and physics sequences for student's major. Corequisite: BIO 423. Physiology of major organ systems of vertebrates, with an emphasis on mammalian physiology. Students may not take both BIO 422 and BIO 424 for credit..

BIO 423 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 422. Exercises that emphasize modern methods of physiological measurement, and the analysis and presentation of physiological data.

BIO 424 Principles of Animal Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 302. Corequisite BIO 425. Basic concepts of comparative animal physiology will be developed from fundamental principles of chemistry, biology, and physics. The evolution of major physiological systems will be examined through a comparison of taxa ranging from protists through vertebrates. Students may not take both BIO 422 and BIO 424 for credit..

BIO 425 Principles of Animal Physiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 424. Exercises that emphasize modern methods of physiological measurement, and the analysis and presentation of physiological data.

BIO 426 Neurobiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 302 or equivalent. Exploration of the relation of behavior to neural function. Topics include basic neurophysiology and properties of sensory and motor systems illustrated with human and nonhuman examples.

BIO 427 Neurobiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 426. Classical invertebrate experiments that provide an introduction to standard neurobiological techniques for studying neural activity including simple dissection, stimulating and recording neural activity, and analyzing data.

BIO 428 Endocrinology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Introduction to functions of hormones and endocrine glands, including mechanisms controlling hormone secretion; mammalian systems emphasized. .

BIO 430 Bioinformatics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 306 and BIO 310. A course in either statistics or computer science is highly recommended. Introduction to the tools and techniques of bioinformatics, with emphasis on computational techniques to analyze genomic and proteomic data. Topics include searching of databases, sequence alignment and analysis, phylogenetic methods and computer programming to analyze database information. A project using original or internet bioinformatics tools is required.

BIO 431 Genetics Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 430. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 430.

B10 432 Molecular Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Principles of modern molecular genetics and gene regulation. .

BIO 435 Techniques in Molecular Biology (1-6-4). Prerequisites: BIO 308. A lecture/laboratory course in fundamentals of modern biotechnology with emphasis on the techniques and procedures of molecular biology. Students will work together to complete a project. .

BIO 436 Evolutionary Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 304 and 308. An introduction to the modern theory of evolutionary genetics, including development of the concepts of genetic diversity, natural selection, random genetic drift, population substructure, infinite-alleles models, and the neutral theory of molecular evolution. .

BIO 438 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. Advanced study of topics in cell and molecular biology. Papers from the primary scientific literature will be read and discussed.

BIO 450 Evolutionary Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 302, and 304 or equivalent. Advanced lectures on evolution that consider traits, genes, and their interaction with environmental variation. Topics include the basic quantitative methods required to interpret evolutionary change, the consequences of population structure, molecular approaches to phylogenetic studies, and the changes in genetic variation under different models of selection, drift, migration, and mutation..

BIO 452 Urban Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 202 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Effects of human actions on ecological processes and ecosystem services in urban environments. Topics include concepts and frameworks related to urban ecology; how urban and urbanizing regions modify the natural environment; the cross-disciplinary nature of urban ecology; and the challenges to designing ecologically sound and sustainable urban areas.

BIO 453 Field Experience in Ecology and Conservation Biology (1 to 6). Prerequisites: BIO 300, 302, and 304. This course will examine principles of ecology and conservation biology through field research in a natural setting. Students will participate in research projects emphasizing analyses of biodiversity, population demography, species interactions, or behavior. Following preparatory sessions at Cleveland State University, the class will travel to off-campus field sites for the balance of the course. Living conditions may be primitive in the field and international travel may be required. See semester course schedule and contact the biology office (216-687-2440) for further information.

BIO 454 Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 300, 302, and 304. Study of interactions of organisms with their environment, including growth and regulation of populations, communities, energetics of organisms and ecosystems, life-history evolution, and systems ecology.

BIO 455 Ecology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 454. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 454. The laboratory includes a few one-day field trips on weekends.

BIO 456 Vertebrate Biology and Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 302 and 304. Topics cover the biology of vertebrates, with special emphasis on those aspects that relate to the evolutionary history of the group; lectures on the basic mechanism of Darwinian evolution.

BIO 458 Behavior (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 302 and 304. An introduction to, and survey of, animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. .

BIO 460 Vertebrate Embryology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. A comparative study of development in the vertebrates. Emphasis is upon developmental anatomy and evolutionary aspects of the group.

BIO 464 Developmental Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308. The fundamental principles of development will be illustrated using classical invertebrate and vertebrate systems. The molecular, genetic, and cellular basis of development will be integrated with classical descriptive and experimental approaches.

BIO 465 Developmental Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 464. Examination of important mechanisms and concepts operating in developing animal systems. Laboratories will expose students to both classical embryology and modern molecular approaches to experimental developmental biology. .

BIO 468 Theories of Aging (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 168, or 308, or permission of instructor. This course is an inquiry into the reasons why some organisms show aging in the form of senescence, while other organisms seem to be perennial, or at least long-lived. Current theories of aging will be critically analyzed.

BIO 471 Summer Local Flora (2-4-4). Study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in summer. Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Students in BIO 471 are required to prepare thirty-five herbarium specimens.

BIO 472 Wetland Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisites: BIO 300 and BIO 304. A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components of wetland ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in wetland ecosystems and community interactions are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and analyses used in wetland ecology. Techniques in wetland characterization and delineation are covered.

BIO 473 Spring Local Flora (2-4-4). Study and identification of representative species, genera, and families of mainly local vascular plants found in spring. Lecture, laboratory, and field work. Students in BIO 473 are required to prepare thirty-five herbarium specimens.

BIO 474 Stream Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 302 or 304 or equivalent. A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components in stream ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in aquatic environments, community interactions, and ecosystem energetics are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and stream ecosystem analyses. Techniques in stream habitat and water quality assessment are covered. To facilitate outdoor excursions, may be scheduled outside normal semester dates and graded initially with a T grade.

BIO 476 Plant Biochemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 300 and 308. Corequisite: BIO 477. Basic physiological processes in plants; photosynthesis, uptake of nutrients, respiration, growth, and the role of hormones and enzymes involved in these processes.

BIO 477 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 476. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 476.

BIO 478 Morphology of Angiosperms (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 300 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 479. Study of the overall form, development and, to a minor extent, microscopic structure of the vegetative and reproductive structures of flowering plants.

BIO 479 Morphology of Angiosperms Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 478. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 478.

BIO 490 Honors Research (1 or 2). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. Supervised research in a faculty member's laboratory on a project approved by the Honors Program Committee. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 491 Honors Research (1 or 2). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. Supervised research in a faculty member's laboratory on a project approved by the Honors Program Committee. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 492 Honors Thesis and Defense (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. Written report on honors research project and a public defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. WAC

BIO 494 Special Topics in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of a particular topic in biology. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

BIO 495 Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisites: Senior standing and major in biology. Presentation of student reports on topics of the instructor's choice. SPAC, BS Bio & BIT Capstone

BIO 496 Independent Study in Biology (1-6). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and permission of chairperson. Special problem or independent study course for undergraduate biology majors. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 497 Independent Research in Biology (1-6). Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and permission of chairperson. Special problem or independent study course for undergraduate biology majors. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 499 Exit Evaluation (0-1-0). Prerequisite: Senior standing. Final exit examination and outcomes assessment evaluation required of all graduating seniors. Graded S/U.

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Note:Courses numbered 500-600 are for students seeking the M.S. degree. Courses numbered 700-800 are for students seeking the Ph.D. degree who already have an M.S. degree or equivalent credit hours. Students enrolled in 700-800 courses are expected to make more substantial contributions to papers, presentations, projects, etc., and will be graded more stringently than students in 500-600 versions.

BIO 500/700 Graduate Orientation (1-0-1). Topics include rules and regulations, research opportunities, scientific writing, and scientific ethics. All students must complete this orientation course before graduation.

BIO 502/702 Graduate Orientation (1-0-1). Topics include radiation safety, animal care and handling, and scientific ethics. All students except those in the non-thesis option must complete both orientation courses before graduation.

BIO 504/704 Biological Chemistry (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 306 or equivalent. Metabolic reactions of the cell for energy production and storage. Structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Regulation and control of metabolic pathways. Structure, function, and transport mechanism of biological membranes. The biochemistry of nitrogen-containing molecules. Emphasis on the chemical control and regulation.

BIO 506/706 Computer Applications in Biology (3-0-3). - to be deleted(Graded S, F, I) Uses of computer methods in the biological sciences. Emphasis will be placed on computer applications in the UNIX environment, including programming languages, statistical analysis software, electronic communication and text processing tools. An applications-oriented final project is required, as well as regular, interactive computer exercises.

BIO 508 Animal Cell Culture (2-2-3). Prerequisite: BIO 308 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Theoretical and practical indroduction to methods of animal cell culture necessary for research in biomedical or biotech labs and in the pharmaceutical industry. Techniques will include choice of medium, passaging, freezing, test of purity and viability, stable and transient transduction, and preparing primary cultures.

BIO 510/710 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy (3-0-3). - to be deletedPrerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 511/711. Consideration in depth of principles and diverse modes of light microscopy which are of major importance in biological research and of aspects of microtechnique. Course includes lectures, demonstrations, and student projects to be undertaken outside scheduled class time.

BIO 511/711 Practice and Theory of Light Microscopy Laboratory (0-2-1). - to be deletedPrerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 510/710. Projects designed to illustrate the principles covered in BIO 510/710.

BIO 512/712 Immunology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 308, BIO 412, and BIO 504. Corequisite: BIO 513/713. The study of immune cell development, organization and expression of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes, including antigen processing and presentation, cytokine regulation, apoptosis, immunity to infections, diseases, and vaccines.

BIO 513/713 Immunology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 512/712. The laboratory covers antibody production, general immunoassays, tissue culture techniques, and genetic engineering techniques.

BIO 514/714 Parasitology (2-0-2). Prerequisite: BIO 302 or equivalent. Corequisite: BIO 515/715. A basic course primarily designed for biology majors who desire an understanding of animal parasitology, including ecology, life histories, host-parasite relationships.

BIO 515/715 Parasitology Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: BIO 514/714. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 514/714.

BIO 516/716 Microbiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 517/717. Structure, function, and genetics of major groups of microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria; the role of microbes in the economy of nature and man.

BIO 517/717 Microbiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 516/716. Laboratory methods for isolation, examination, manipulation, and experimentation with protozoa.

BIO 518/718 Histology (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 519/719. Structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs with emphasis on relations of structure and function.

BIO 519/719 Histology Laboratory(0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 518/718. Laboratory investigations of the structure of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs.

BIO 520 Explorations in Biology: Inquiry-Based Investigations of Urban Ecosystems (1-2-2). A week-long introduction to the ecology of human-dominated ecosystems. Lectures and laboratories consider biodiversity, human impacts on ecosystems and vice versa, and ecological monitoring programs and their integration into school curricula. Intended for upper elementary, middle, and high school teachers. Held at the Woodlake Environmental Field Station, Peninsula, Ohio.

BIO 522/722 Mammalian Physiology (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 523/723. Physiology of major organ systems of vertebrates, with an emphasis on mammalian physiology.

BIO 523/723 Mammalian Physiology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 522/722. Exercises that emphasize modern methods of physiological measurement, and the analysis and presentation of physiological data.

BIO 526/726 Neurobiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 301 or equivalent. Exploration of the relation of behavior to neural function; topics include basic neurophysiology and properties of sensory and motor systems illustrated with human and non-human examples.

BIO 527/727 Neurobiology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 526/726, or equivalent and permission of instructor. Classical invertebrate experiments that provide an introduction to standard neurobiological techniques for studying neural activity, including simple dissection, stimulating and recording neural activity, and analyzing data.

BIO 528/728 Endocrinology (3-0-3). Introduction to functions of hormones and endocrine glands, including mechanisms controlling hormone secretion; mammalian systems emphasized.

BIO 530/730 Bioinformatics (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 306 and BIO 310, or equivalents, or permission of instructor. A course in either statistics or computer science is highly recommended. Introduction to the tools and techniques of bioinformatics, with emphasis on computational techniques to analyze genomic and proteomic data. Topics include searching of databases, sequence alignment and analysis, phylogenetic methods and computer programming to analyze database information. A project using original or internet bioinformatics tools is required.

BIO 534/734 Elements of Pharmacology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 306, and BIO 422 or BIO 424, or permission of instructor. An analysis of the basic principles of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of selected therapeutic agents. Emphasis will be on the experimental basis of drug discovery, design, and clinical use.

BIO 535/735 Techniques in Molecular Biology (1-6-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A lecture/laboratory course in the fundamentals of modern biotechnology with emphasis on the techniques and procedures of molecular biology. Students will work together to complete a project.

BIO 536/736 Evolutionary Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to the modern theory of evolutionary genetics, including development of the concepts of genetic diversity, natural selection, random genetic drift, population substructure, infinite-alleles models, and the neutral theory of molecular evolution.

BIO 538/738 Clinical Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Good standing the the Physician Assistant Program or Permission of instructor. Principles of clinical genetics and the use of traditional and molecular methods for the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of genetic disorders.

BIO 540/740 Biostatistics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Introductory course in biostatistics, which will include probability, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, regression, and other analytical statistical methods applicable to biology.

BIO 542/742 Morphometrics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Application of mathematical and statistical methodology to problems of biological structure and functional form. Individual projects will involve detailed morphometric analyses of real data.

BIO 548 Biogeography (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300, 302, or 304, or equivalent. Topics reflect the study of the distribution, ranges and limits of animals and plants and the interaction of physical and biotic systems to explain patterns of diversity and change across time at population, community and ecosystem levels.

BIO 550/750 Evolutionary Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to the modern theory of evolution.

BIO 752 Marine Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 301, BIO 304, or equivalents. An advanced ecology course that encompasses marine biology, ecological adaptations of organisms to the marine environment, and interspecific interactions. This course will cover marine habitats and the specializations of organisms that live in them.

BIO 552 Urban Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 202 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Effects of human actions on ecological processes and ecosystem services in urban environments. Topics include concepts and frameworks related to urban ecology; how urban and urbanizing regions modify the natural environment; the cross-disciplinary nature of urban ecology; and the challenges to designing ecologically sound and sustainable urban areas.

BIO 554/754 Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 304 or equivalent. Study of interactions of organisms with their environment, including growth and regulation of populations, communities, energetics of organisms and ecosystems, life-history evolution, and systems ecology.

BIO 555/755 Ecology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: BIO 304 or equivalent. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 554/754 and to provide field experience in ecology. The laboratory includes a few one-day field trips on weekends.

BIO 558/758 Behavior (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to and survey of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective.

BIO 562/762 Evolutionary Ecology of Sexual Reproduction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300, or BIO 302, or permission of instructor. Although organisms spend huge amounts of energy in carrying out activities related to sexual reproduction, it is by far the most dominate mode of reproduction, but why? This course will attempt to explore that question and to examine various modes of sexual reproduction in diverse organisms in an evolutionary context.

BIO 564/764 Developmental Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: A course in embryology or developmental biology. An experimental analysis of the mechanisms of development with emphasis on events at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization.

BIO 565/765 Developmental Biology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: A course in embryology or developmental biology. Corequisite: BIO 564/764. Laboratory involving experimental analyses of the mechanisms of development.

BIO 570/770 Protozoology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 571/771. Classification, morphology, and physiology of protozoa.

BIO 571/771 Protozoology Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: A course in microbiology. Corequisite: BIO 570/770. Laboratory methods for isolation, examination, manipulation, and experimentation with protozoa.

BIO 572/772 Wetland Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisites: BIO 300 and BIO 304. A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components of wetland ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in wetland ecosystems and community interactions are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and analyses used in wetland ecology. Techniques in wetland characterization and delineation are covered.

BIO 574/774 Stream Ecology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: BIO 300 or 302 or 304 or equivalent. A study of the interaction of physical, geochemical, and biological components in stream ecosystems. Adaptations of organisms in aquatic environments, community interactions, and ecosystem energetics are emphasized. Field and laboratory study give students experience in inquiry-based activities involving data collection and stream ecosystem analyses. Techniques in stream habitat and water quality assessment are covered. To facilitate outdoor excursions, may be scheduled outside normal semester dates and graded initially with a T grade.

BIO 576/776 Plant Biochemistry (3-0-3). Corequisite: BIO 577/777. Basic physiological processes in plants; photosynthesis, uptake of nutrients, respiration, growth, and the role of hormones and enzymes involved in these processes.

BIO 577/777 Plant Biochemistry Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 576/776. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BIO 576/776.

BIO 578/778 Morphology of Flowering Plants (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Any botany course for biology majors, or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIO 579/779. Study of the overall form, development, and to a minor extent the microscopic structure of the vegetative and reproductive structure of flowering plants (angiosperms).

BIO 579/779 Morphology of Flowering Plants Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: BIO 578/778. Laboratory study of the overall form, development, and to a minor extent the microscopic structure of the vegetative and reproductive structure of flowering plants (angiosperms).

BIO 580 Biology Content for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5). Enrollment is restricted to in-service middle school teachers without science specialty and students enrolled in the M. Ed. Middle School Science program. No credit towards completion of a graduate degree in biology. Biological concepts relevant to teaching middle-school-level biology will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.

BIO 584/784 Writing and Editing Grant Proposals (1-0-1). This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of preparing grant proposals to private, state and federal agencies. Key topics covered will be: formulating specific experimental aims, experimental design, critiques and re-submission.

BIO 585/785 Practical Grant Writing (3-0-3). An introduction to the fundamentals of preparing grant proposals to private, state and federal agencies, with some focus on those supporting biomedical research. Students will write and revise a major grant proposal.

BIO 588 Museum Studies in Natural History (3-0-3). Prerequisite: ART 505 and permission of instructor.Introduction to museums with particular attention to all aspects of science museums, including education, preservation of collections, research, display for study and enrichment, living collections, interactive displays, and nature preserves. Field trips may occur outside scheduled class hours.

BIO 593 Special Topics in Biology, with Lab (1 to 5 credits). Prerequisite: at least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in biology. Includes lab or excursions or other practical exercises. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

BIO 594 Special Topics in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A lecture course on a special topic.

BIO 595 Environmental Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A seminar course for students seeking a M.S. in Environmental Science.

BIO 596/796 Independent Study in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Specialized study of a particular topic in biology.

BIO 597 Independent Research in Biology (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of BGES Graduate Program Director. Special research project or independent study course with lab, field work, or other experimental component. Not for thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Students should make arrangements with an instructor concerning topic, format, and grade criteria before registering for this course.

 

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BIO 602/802 Enzymology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 504 or equivalent. General consideration of enzyme nomenclature, purification, assay, introductory kinetics and mechanisms, cofactors, active sites, subunit structure, allosteric and regulatory properties, and the control of multienzyme systems.

BIO 604/804 Cell Biology (3-0-3). Examination of basic cellular processes including structure and function of organelles and biomembranes, intracellular transport, cell motility and shape, and cellular signaling events as they relate to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and the integration of cells into tissues. Heavy reliance will be made on the experimental basis for our understanding of these phenomena, with extensive use of the primary literature.

BIO 608/808 Pharmacodynamics (3-0-3). - to be deletedPrerequisites: Courses in biochemistry and physiology, or equivalent. Principles of the interaction between drugs and tissues.

BIO 610/810 Molecular Biology and Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 504/704 or equivalent. Structure and function of nucleic acids. Replication, modification, and recombination of DNA. Transcription, translation, and regulation of transcription and translation.

BIO 612/812 Microbial Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: BIO 416 and BIO 506, or equivalents. Microbial growth and reproduction considered at the molecular level; discussions of structure, growth kinetics, synthesis of DNA, RNA, and protein, regulation of metabolism, and other biological molecules; physiology; metabolic pathways of bacteria, fungi, and protozoans.

BIO 616/816 Proliferative Signal Transduction (3-0-3). - to be deletedPrerequisite: BIO 506. A general overview of the cell cycle and consideration of factors involved in proliferative signal transduction at the cell surface.

BIO 622/822 Advanced Vertebrate Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A general overview of the cell cycle and consideration of factors involved in proliferative signal transduction at the cell surface.

BIO 624/824 Foundations of Biomedical Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BME doctoral student status or permission of instructor. A graduate-level introduction providing a foundation for applied and basic research in human and mammalian physiology, including basic information and current active research.

BIO 630/830 Recombinant DNA Techniques (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 506. Lecture course on recombinant DNA techniques. Theoretical background and practical application of plasmids, restriction and modifying enzymes, lambda phage and vectors. The use of genomic and cDNA libraries and a variety of detection systems to isolate and characterize cloned DNA, including hybridization techniques and DNA sequence analysis, will be discussed.

BIO 632/832 Population Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Theoretical analysis of the mechanisms and consequences of allele frequency changes in populations of organisms.

BIO 634/834 Developmental Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 504. A molecular genetics course. Genetics of development in single and multicellular systems, with emphasis on programmed and differential gene expression.

BIO 638/838 Advances in Cell Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in cell biology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 640/840 Molecular Evolutionary Genetics (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Theoretical and practical analyses of genomic evolution at the molecular level. Individual projects will involve quantitative studies of nucleotide and protein sequences.

BIO 651/851 Advanced Research in Field Biology (0-6-3). Prerequisites: Previous course work in ecology, evolution, behavior, or conservation biology or permission of the instructor. This course will examine field techniques for the analysis of biodiversity and ecological relationships through participation in field research projects. Study sites are in remote, primitive locations and may involve international travel. See instructor for location, costs, and preparations necessary for the course.

BIO 653/853 Advanced Research in Field Biology (0-8-4). Four-credit version of BIO 652/852.

BIO 656/856 Environmental Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 424 or equivalent. Physiological adaptations to environmental problems; major environmental variables considered: food and energy, light, temperature, oxygen, water, and salinity; adaptations to the daily and seasonal changes in the environment.

BIO 670/870 Advances in Biology (2-0-2). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in modern biology. Through lectures, discussion, and readings of the primary literature, students will explore information at the "cutting edge" of the field. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 672/872 Advances in Molecular Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in molecular biology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 674/874 Advances in Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in Ecology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 676/876 Advances in Physiology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in physiology. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 678/878 Advances in Evolution (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. In-depth study of significant, recent conceptual or methodological advances in evolution. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 684/884 Research Seminar (1-0-1). Weekly topics vary with instructor and guest speakers. May be repeated for credit.

BIO 688 Graduate Seminar (M.S.) (1-0-1). Topic varies with instructor. May be repeated for credit. Offered every term.

BIO 690 Non-Thesis M.S. Exit Project (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. The exit literature research project for completion of the non-thesis Masters degree in biology: an in-depth written review of the literature on a selected topic in biology, and its oral defense. May not be repeated for credit.

BIO 691 M.S. Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate program director. Research for students entering the program, before submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

BIO 693 Graduate Project (M.S.) (0-4-2). (Graded S, F, I) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate committee and supervisory professor. An independent research project terminating with a written report. May be repeated for credit to a limit of 6 credit hours.

BIO 694 Graduate Project (M.S.) (0-6-3). (Graded S, F, I) A 3-credit version of BIO 693.

BIO 695 M.S. Thesis Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate committee and supervisory professor. Thesis research for students, after submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

BIO 888 Ph.D. Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Ph.D. program, or more than 32 credits, or the M.S. Degree.

BIO 891 Ph.D. Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate program director. Research for students entering the program, before submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

BIO 895 Ph.D. Dissertation Research (1-10). (Graded S, NS, F, T) Prerequisite: Written approval of graduate committee and supervisory professor. Research for students, after submission of the CSU Thesis/Dissertation Proposal Approval Form.

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EVS 206 Introduction to Environmental Science (4-0-4). An introduction to the interlinkages of nature, with substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, anthropology, political sciences and many other areas. The role of humans as destroyers and conservationists in nature will be studied. Natural and human caused hazards and prevention will be investigated. Natural Science.

EVS 300 Physical Features of Ecosystems (3-0-3). Prerequisite: EVS 206 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 301
Overview of the dynamics of the abiotic factors contributing to ecosystem structure and function. The course will include water resources and flood hazards, environmental hazards, soils, and waste management. It will deal both with natural factors and environments that have been affected by human intervention, as well as conservation of the resources on which society depends.

EVS 301 Physical Features of Ecosystems Lab (0-2-1). Prerequisite: EVS 206 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 300
The course will include water resources and flood hazards, environmental hazards, soils, and waste management. It will deal both with natural factors and environments that have been affected by human intervention, as well as conservation of the resources on which society depends.

EVS 302 Biological Features of Ecosystems (3-0-3). Prerequisite: EVS 206 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 303
An introduction to biological features and resources of ecosystems, and their conservation and management.

EVS 303 Biological Features of Ecosystems Lab (0-2-1). Prerequisite: EVS 206 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 302
Selected exercises to reinforce concepts covered in EVS 302

EVS 380 Earth System Science for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5). Enrollment is restricted to in-service middle school teachers without science specialty and students enrolled in the M. Ed. Middle School Science program. No credit towards completion of a graduate degree in environmental science. Earth system concepts relevant to teaching middle-school-level earth system science will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.

EVS 390 Writing in Environmental Science I (2-0-2). This course is designed to develop the writing and oral presentation skills of students through assigned projects and in-class activities. Students will write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. WAC

EVS 450 Applied Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300, or BIO 302, or BIO 304, or permission of instructor. Our lives have been increasingly touched by questions pertaining to environmental degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Students will examine ways in which ecological principles can be applied to solving some of these crucial environmental problems. Topics include global climate change, sustainability, agroforestry, biodiversity and conservation, invasive species, ecotoxicology, biomonitoring and bioremediation, and restoration ecology.

EVS 454 Conservation Biology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 304. This course will examine the causes and scientific responses to the current world-wide crisis of declining biodiversity. Scientific principles underlying conservation biology are emphasized, but students also will explore the role that culture, societal values, politics, and economics play in conservation issues.

EVS 455 Conservation Biology Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite: BIO 304. Examination of central principles of conservation biology through field studies and computerized analyses of data for actual endangered and threatened species. This laboratory course provides students with experience in quantification and analysis of biodiversity, environmental monitoring, mathematical modeling, risk assessment, and other methods used in conservation biology, ecology, and natural resource management.

EVS 470 Aquatic Ecosystems (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalents. A study of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. Commonalities and differences beween the physical, chemical and biological components of these ecosystems are discusseed. The impacts of human activities on these ecosysems are covered, as well as water quality assessment techniques, pollution control, and regulation. The course includes three required Saturday field trips.

EVS 471 Aquatic Ecosystems Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalents. Corequisite: EVS 470 Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts coverd in EVS 570, including laboratory and field exercises to introduce students to hands-on sampling and analytical techniques used in water quality measurement. This course includes three required Staturday field trips, each equivalent to two classroom laboratory periods.

EVS 472 Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio (2-0-2). Prerequisite: GEO 323 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: EVS 473. Introduction to the study of watersheds.

EVS 473 Introduction to Watersheds of Northeast Ohio Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: EVS 472. Students will examine chemical, biological, and habitat aspects of area streams, study the watersheds of those streams, and carry out limited watershed-modeling exercises designed to help understand the dynamics of watersheds and the streams that drain them.

EVS 490 Internship in Environmental Science (0-8-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Independent study related to work experience for majors in environmental sciences.

EVS 491 Honors Research (1 or 2). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. Supervised research in a faculty member's laboratory on a project approved by the Honors Program Committee. May be repeated for credit.

EVS 492 Honors Thesis and Defense (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Honors degree status. Written report on honors research project and a public defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. WAC

EVS 493 Special Topics in Environmental Science, with Lab (1 to 5). Prerequisite: at least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

EVS 494 Special Topics in Environmental Science (1 to 6). Prerequisite: At least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

EVS 495 Seminar (1-0-1). Prerequisites: At least junior standing. Presentation of student reports on topics of the instructor's choice. SPAC, BS Bio & BIT Capstone

EVS 494 Special Topics in Environmental Science (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

EVS 496 Independent Study in Environmental Science (0-8-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Independent study of material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for or covered in regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

EVS 497 Research in Environmental Science (0-8-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Undergraduate research carried out by special arrangement. The student may work independently or as an assistant to a faculty investigator.

EVS 506 Ecosystem Science (3-0-3). Introduction to the science of ecosystems. Substantive materials from geology, biology, and chemistry are used to create a picture of the complex systems underlying the world and human society, and how society can manage these systems.

EVS 510 Environmental Geology for Teachers (3-0-3). Detailed examination of geologic hazards and the constraints placed by regional geology and geography on the problems facing modern, urban, industrial societies. Intended for working teachers in area school systems. A significant part of the course involves development of curricular materials for use in participants' own classes.

EVS 512 Geological History of the Cleveland Area for Teachers (3-0-3). Provides a basis for illustrating the relation of regional geology to the physical, economic, and social development of the Cleveland area. Emphasis on laboratory experimentation and field trip studies. Intended for working teachers in area school systems. Part of the course involves the development of curricular materials for use in participants' own classes.

EVS 514 Ecosystem Science for Teachers (3-0-3). Introduction to the science of ecosystems. Substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, and other sciences are integrated to 1) create a coherent picture of the functioning of complex systems underpinning the natural world and human society, and 2) help students understand how society can manage these systems. A significant part of the course involves the development of curricular materials for use in participants' own classes.

EVS 520 Rivers and Watersheds of Northeast Ohio (2-0-2). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the study of watersheds.

EVS 521 Rivers and Watersheds Laboratory (0-4-2). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or permission of the instructor. Introduction to the practical study of watersheds. Students will examine chemical, biological, and habitat aspects of area streams; study the watersheds of those streams; and carry out limited watershed-modeling exercises designed to help them understand the dynamics of watersheds and the streams that drain them.

EVS 523 Map interpretation and Visualization of Space (1-4-3). Introduction to the uses of topographic, geologic, and specialized maps. Practicum on using maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery to interpret and communicate information on landscape details, geologic and geographic hazards, and land-use planning. Review of physical geology sufficient to allow the student to be able to read and interpret the literature in applied geology for environmental applications.

EVS 525 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing (2-4-4). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or equivalent.Introduction to Remote Sensing, Geographic Information Systems, and the use of computerized techniques for assessing geographically distributed data, including analysis and presentation of data, and the use of satellite imagery and aerial photography, and commercial and internet data sets. Lectures to be scheduled within lab hours.

EVS 527 Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing and GIS (1-6-4). Prerequisite: EVS 525.Intensive investigation of the techniques and problems associated with using remote-sensed data for GIS-based analyses in geology, biology, and environmental science.

EVS 550 Applied Ecology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 300, or BIO 302, or BIO 304, or permission of instructor. Our lives have been increasingly touched by questions pertaining to environmental degradation at local, regional, and global scales. Students will examine ways in which ecological principles can be applied to solving some of these crucial environmental problems. Topics include global climate change, sustainability, agroforestry, biodiversity and conservation, invasive species, ecotoxicology, biomonitoring and bioremediation, and restoration ecology.

EVS 560 Geomorphology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: EVS 523 or equivalent. Study of the surface forms of the earth, with emphasis on erosional or depositional processes in different climates, the landforms they produce, and their environmental implications. Includes self-paced laboratory exercises outside of scheduled lectures.

EVS 570 Aquatic Ecosystems (3-0-3). Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalents. A study of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. Commonalities and differences beween the physical, chemical and biological components of these ecosystems are discusseed. The impacts of human activities on these ecosysems are covered, as well as water quality assessment techniques, pollution control, and regulation. The course includes three required Saturday field trips.

EVS 571 Aquatic Ecosystems Laboratory (0-2-1). Prerequisite: BIO 200, BIO 202, and CHM 261 or equivalents. Corequisite: EVS 570 Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts coverd in EVS 570, including laboratory and field exercises to introduce students to hands-on sampling and analytical techniques used in water quality measurement. This course includes three required Staturday field trips, each equivalent to two classroom laboratory periods.

EVS 580 Earth System Science for Middle School Teachers (3-4-5). Enrollment is restricted to in-service middle school teachers without science specialty and students enrolled in the M. Ed. Middle School Science program. No credit towards completion of a graduate degree in environmental science. Earth system concepts relevant to teaching middle-school-level earth system science will be discussed and related to timely issues. Lectures will coordinate with laboratory exercises and inquiry-based activities.

EVS 581 OhioView Prerequisite in Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 582 OhioView Introduction to Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course including any prerequisites normally required for the course in question. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 585 OhioView Advanced Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course including any prerequisites normally required for the course in question. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 588 OhioView Research in Remote Sensing (variable 1-4). Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor at the university offering the course. Placeholder course designed to enable CSU students to take Remote Sensing prerequisite courses offered at other OhioView universities over the Polycom network. Details on material, schedules, and syllabi for courses to be offered will be provided roughly two months before the beginning of the semester.

EVS 593 Special Topics in Environmental Science, with Lab (1 to 5 credits). Prerequisite: at least junior standing. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Includes lab or excursions or other practical exercises. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

EVS 594 Special Topics in Environmental Science (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of a particular topic in environmental science. Topics to be announced in semester course schedule. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

EVS 596 Independent Study in Environmental Science (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Program Director. Special research problem or independent study course. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Students should make arrangements with an instructor concerning topic, format, and grade criteria before registering for this course.

EVS 597 Independent Research in Environmental Science (variable 1-6). Prerequisite: Permission of BGES Graduate Program Director. Special research project or independent study course with lab, field work, or other experimental component. Not for thesis research. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic. Students should make arrangements with an instructor concerning topic, format, and grade criteria before registering for this course.

EVS 680 Issues in Environmental Sciences (3-0-3). In-depth study of significant, conceptual or methodological issues in environmental science from geological and biological perspectives. Topic varies with the instructor. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

EVS 690 Non-Thesis M.S. Exit Project (1-0-1). Prerequisite: Permission of graduate committee. The exit literature research project for completion of the non-thesis Masters degree in environmental science: an in-depth written review of the literature on a selected topic in environmental science, and its oral defense. May not be repeated for credit.

EVS 691 M.S. Research in Environmental Science (variable: 1-12). Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director. Research prior to approval of the thesis research proposal for students seeking the M.S. degree in environmental science. (Graded S, NS, F, T)

EVS 695 M.S. Thesis Research in Environmental Science (variable: 1-12). Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Program Director. Research following approval of the thesis research proposal for students seeking the M.S. degree in environmental science. (Graded S, NS, F, T)

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GEO 100 Introductory Geology (3-0-3). Corequisite: GEO 101. Basic instruction concerning the composition of the earth, with a detailed discussion of the physical and chemical processes that bring about its continual evolution. Natural Science.

GEO 101 Introductory Geology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 100. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 100. Natural Science Laboratory.

GEO 106 Introduction to Meteorology (3-0-3). Introduction to weather and weather systems, with a detailed discussion on the nature of the atmosphere, air motions, precipitation, storms, weather patterns, and weather analysis. Natural Science.

GEO 124 Beyond Google Earth (3-1-4).Overview of the imagery and other tools used by geospatial scientists to evaluate the resources and limitations of the earth's surface. Geographic Positioning Systems, Aerial Photography, Satellite Imagery, and Geographic Information Systems and their applications will be discussed. Laboratory exercises will provide hands-on experience with these technologies and with the techniques used to extract information and understanding from raw geospatial data. Natural Science.

GEO 140 Development of Continents and Oceans (3-0-3). Introduction to the structure and history of continents and ocean basins; examination of geological provinces of North America and the sequence of events through geological time that created the North American continent. Natural Science.

GEO 150 Geological History of the Earth (3-0-3). Introduction to the history of the earth. Examination of the biochemical and geological evidence for the origin of life and the mechanisms and patterns of evolution, evaluating the most significant events in the evolutionary history of plants and animals through geological time. Introduction to the structure and history of continents and ocean basins, concentrating on the events through geological time that created the North American continent. Natural Science. GenEd08

GEO 151 Geological History of the Earth Laboratory (0-2-1). Pre- or Corequisite: GEO 150. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 150, including interpretation of maps, implications of geological laws and principles, and identification of fossils. Natural Science.

GEO 170 Origin and History of Life (3-0-3). Biochemical and geological evidence relating to the origin of life and the mechanisms and patterns of evolution; significant events in the evolutionary history of plants and animals. Natural Science.

GEO 204 Mineralogy (3-2-4). Prerequisite: GEO 100, CHM 261, or permission of instructor. One year of chemistry recommended.. This course is the study of the nature, chemistry, and crystal structure of minerals. The course is shared with the University of Akron. When offered at Akron, lecture components will be available at CSU using distance learning facilities but laboratories will be only in Akron.

GEO 206 Petrology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: GEO 100 and one year of chemistry or permission of instructor. This course is the study of silicate minerals and the way they and non-silicate minerals form rocks. The course is shared with the University of Akron. When offered at Akron, lecture components will be available at CSU using distance learning facilities but laboratories will be only in Akron.

GEO 210 The Earth and Human Affairs (3-0-3). Examination of geologic hazards, such as earthquakes, landslides, floods, and shoreline erosion, including class discussion of current events of this type; examination of development of society. Natural Science.

GEO 230 Natural Resources (3-0-3). Examination of our natural resources with emphasis on non-renewable mineral resources; discussion of the effect of population growth and technology on rates of consumption, mineral economics, and the concept of "reserves"; the future outlook with regard to alternative sources of energy, substitutes, and recycling. Natural Science.

GEO 293 Special Topics in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics to reflect material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for regular, continuing course offerings. May be repeated for up to 16 credits with a change in topic.

GEO 302 Paleobiology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: GEO 100/101 or permission of instructor. This is the study of the origins, evolution, and fossil record of life and the development of living things over the last half-billion years. The course is shared with the University of Akron. When offered at Akron, lecture components will be available at CSU using distance learning facilities but laboratories will be only in Akron.

GEO 312 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (3-0-3). Prerequisites: GEO 100 and GEO 323, which may be taken concurrently with GEO 312, or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: GEO 313. Study of the origin, dispersal, deposition, and lithification of sediments; variation of sedimentary parameters; discussions of facies, correlation, use of sedimentary structures, and paleographic reconstruction; regional stratigraphy of North America.

GEO 313 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 312. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 312.

GEO 314 Paleoecology (3-0-3). Environmental reconstruction using fossils; particular attention given to organism-sediment interrelations, organism diversity and distribution adaptive morphology, and community structure.

GEO 320 Structural Geology (3-0-3). Prerequisites: GEO 100 and GEO 323 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: GEO 321. Study of the forces involved in the deformation of the earth's crustand the mechanical properties of materials, with emphasis on the recognition, interpretation, and illustration of the resultant geologic structures.

GEO 321 Structural Geology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 320. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 320.

GEO 323 Geospatial Tools and Concepts (1-4-3). Prerequisite: GEO 100 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the uses of topographic, geologic, and specialized maps. Practicum on using maps to interpret and communicate information of land forms, geologic hazards and land-use planning. Natural Science.

GEO 350 Introduction to Oceanography (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Minimum of two science courses. Examination of the interrelated physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes operating in sea water and ocean basins; selected topics relating to the geologic interpretation of the marine rock record, factors regulating growth and environmental habitat of organisms, and the geophysics of ocean basins.

GEO 354 Geochemistry (4-0-4). Prerequisites: At least one course at the 300 level or higher in both Geology and Chemistry. Study of geochemical principles and their application to geologic processes. Topics include radiometric dating, element abundance, water chemistry, and sedimentary geochemistry, and the geochemistry of invertebrate skeletons, particularly their isotopic and trace element compositions.

GEO 358 Field Geology of the Cleveland Area (2-0-2). Prerequisites: Two courses in science or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEO 359. This course describes the geological history of the Cleveland area and illustrates its relation to the physical, economic, and social development of Cleveland. The course will include laboratory exercises but will emphasize field trip studies.

GEO 359 Field Geology of the Cleveland Area Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 358. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 358.

GEO 390 Writing in Geology I (2-0-2). This course is designed to develop the writing and oral presentation skills of students through assigned projects and in-class activities. Students will write conceptual (review or theoretical) papers according to a standard format. A substantial written report is one of the requirements. WAC

GEO 404 Environmental Science for Teachers (3-0-3). Prerequisites: At least three courses in the College of Education at the 300 level or above, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Application of environmental science to the classroom. Substantive materials from geology, biology, chemistry, and other sciences will be integrated to create (1) a coherent picture of the functioning of the complex systems underpinning the natural world and human society and (2) the ability for students to understand how society can manage these systems. This course in intended for students working toward school certification. A significant part of the course will be the development of curricular materials based on course content for use in participants' own classes.

GEO 408 Environmental Geology for Teachers (3-0-3). Prerequisites: At least three courses in the College of Education at the 300 level or above, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Detailed examination of geologic hazards and the constraints placed by regional geology and geography on the problems facing modern, urban, industrial societies. This course is intended for students working toward school certification. A significant part of the course will be the development of curricular materials based on course content for use in participants' own classes.

GEO 410 Geological History of the Cleveland Area (3-0-3). Prerequisites: At least three courses in the College of Education at the 300 level or above, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. This course provides a basis of illustrating the relation of regional geology to the physical, economic, and social development of the Cleveland area. The course will emphasize laboratory experimentation and field trip studies.

GEO 420 Rivers and Watersheds of Northeast Ohio (2-0-2). Prerequisite: GEO 323 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GEO 421. Introduction to the study of watersheds.

GEO 421 Rivers and Watersheds Laboratory (0-4-2). Corequisite: GEO 420. Students will examine chemical, biological, and habitat aspects of area streams, study the watersheds of those streams, and carry out limited watershed-modeling exercises designed to help understand the dynamics of watersheds and the streams that drain them.

GEO 425 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (2-4-4). Prerequisite: GEO 323. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and the use of computerized techniques for assessing geographically distributed data. The course will include the use of GIS techniques to analyze data and present those analyses. It will concentrate on the use of satellite imagery and aerial photography, as well as standardized data sets available from commercial sources and the World Wide Web. Laboratory is selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in lecture..

GEO 427 Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (1-6-4). Prerequisite: GEO 424.Intensive investigation of the techniques and problems associated with using remote-sensed data for Geographic Information Systems-based analyses in geology, biology, and environmental science.

GEO 444 Hydrogeology (3-0-3). Prerequisite: At least one course at the 300 level or higher in Geology (excluding GEO 404, 408, and 410). Corequisite: GEO 445. Study of the concepts and principles of ground water flow in rocks, sediments, and soils. The course will deal with flow in both saturated and unsaturated zones and will include issues related to ground-water use, pollution, and ground-water monitoring both for quality and quantity.

GEO 445 Hydrogeology Laboratory (0-2-1). Corequisite: GEO 444. Selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in GEO 444. Laboratory exercises will cover mathematical and computer solutions to equations and real life situations. Some field work will be required.

GEO 451 Field Geology (4 to 8 credits).Geological mapping using aerial photographs and topographic maps; solution of field problems in stratigraphy, structure, and paleontology; written report required. Offered in summer quarter at selected universities.

GEO 460 Geomorphology (3-2-4). Prerequisite: GEO 323 or permission of instructor. Study of the surface forms of the earth, with emphasis on erosional or depositional processes in different climates and the forms they produce. WAC

GEO 490 Internship in Geology (1 to 4 credits ). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Independent study related to work experience for majors in geology and environmental sciences.

GEO 493 Special Topics in Geology, with Lab (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics to reflect material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for regular, continuing course offerings.

GEO 494 Special Topics in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics to reflect material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for regular, continuing course offerings.

GEO 496 Independent Study in Geology (1 to 4 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Independent study of material of special or timely interest which is not likely to be appropriate for or covered in regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

GEO 497 Research in Geology (1 to 12 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Undergraduate research carried out by special arrangement. The student may work independently or as an assistant to a faculty investigator. May be repeated for up to 16 credit hours.

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