Cellular and Molecular Medicine Specialization

NOA-AGEP SCHOLARS

Kayla Meritt
 
Kayla Meritt, PhD student in Regulatory Biology
 
Undergraduate degree (Bachelors of Science in Biology) from: Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH
 
Currently,  PhD student in Regulatory Biology (the program is jointly operated with the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic). Undergoing rotation at the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic.
 
 
Personal statement: I am interested in cancer biology, specifically in how oncogenes play a significant role in chemotherapy resistance. As well, I intend to study the effect of chemotherapy drugs on leukemic and breast cancer patients and understand the mechanisms that govern metastatic development of cancer cells.
 
 
Kenya Wilcots
 
Kenya Wilcots, PhD student in Clinical-Bioanalytical Chemistry
 
Undergraduate degree (Bachelors of Science in Biology) from: Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY
 
Currently, PhD student in Clinical-Bioanalytical Chemistry Program (jointly operated with the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic).
 
 
 
Personal statement: My research interests are thrombotic cardiovascular disease. Investigating the effect of a specific post-translational modification that occur during platelet activation in ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction. My approach is to understand ubiquitination as it relates to platelet function in thrombotic cardiovascular disease. In doing so I will be working with Dr. Thomas McIntyre (Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Cleveland Clinic) to explore the ubiquitin-proteasome system.
 

Tanetta Curenton

 

Tanetta Curenton, Doctoral student in Applied Biomedical Engineering
 
Undergraduate degree (Bachelor of Arts) from: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
 
Currently, PhD student in Applied Biomedical Engineering Program (jointly operated with the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic).
 
 
Personal statement: My research interests are at the interface of bioengineering and cancer cell biology. Focusing on molecular and cellular mechanisms, tissue engineering methods will be utilized to investigate and inform the development of novel therapeutic techniques and regenerative medicine approaches for brain cancer.

 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers HRD 1432053, 1432864, 1432868, 1432878, 1432891, 1432921, and 1432950. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.