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December, 2009

 

Greetings from the College of Science!

 

bette bonder
Bette Bonder, Dean

Dear Friends,

This newsletter is special because it offers an opportunity to look back at five very successful years for the College of Science. This retrospective view of our activities is a heartening one, because it makes clear how much the College has accomplished in its short life. It would take far more space than we have here to recount the many achievements of our students, graduates, faculty, and staff. Suffice it to say, we have a remarkable community of individuals who contribute to the forward momentum that will be evident as you read this summary. I have chosen a (very) few achievements to mention here, as a small sample of our activities:

  • Average undergraduate cumulative GPA has risen from 2.91 to 2.98. This figure has been consistently higher than the University average;
  • Average ACT score has increased from 20.5 to 21.0, the second highest in the University;
  • Retention of COS students from fall 2007 to fall 2008 was 62%;
  • Enrollment increased from 1,922 (Fall, 2004) to 2,628 (Fall, 2009), a 27% increase;
  • Student credit hours delivered  increased from 75,871 (2004) to 90,202 (2009), a 19% increase;
  • Number of graduates increased from 338 (2004) to 454 (2009), a 34% increase;
  • Grant funded student support increased from $110,152 (2004) to $334,319, an increase of 204%;
  • The number of new enrolled honors students increased from 17 (2004) to 22 (2008);
  • Faculty members have received competitive grants for their innovative research from the NSF, the NIH, the American Heart Association, Department of Energy, NASA and others;
  • College of Science research has yielded numerous patents and two start-up companies;
  • Engaged learning experiences include: inquiry based labs in chemistry and physics; unique curriculum in human gross anatomy laboratory and neuroscience; and speech language pathology programs featuring a functioning on-campus clinic. Students are also engaged through the honors program, the opportunity to present at scientific conferences, and co-op and internships opportunities with organizations such as NASA, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, the CDC, the Ohio EPA, Lubrizol, Sherwin Williams and many more;
  • Graduates of the Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech and Hearing, Physician Assisting and School Psychology programs have an overall pass rate consistently above national averages, most recently at or near 100%;
  • Occupational and Physical Therapy and MSHS with a concentration in Physician Assisting (collaborative with Tri-C) are vital to the provision of healthcare locally as they are the only such programs in the area;
  • Each year, up to 15 students from the Chemistry Department can move directly into the Doctor of Pharmacy program at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Pharmacy;
  • Faculty in Cellular and Molecular Medicine have received increasing amounts of funding from the NIH to support their nationally recognized research;
  • The Master’s program in Medical Physics has been rated one of the strongest professional programs in the country by the American Institute of Physics. The program is in the process of transitioning to a Doctor of Medical Physics consistent with new requirements from the accrediting body. The Cleveland Clinic is a partner in this undertaking;
  • The Master’s of Psychology in Diversity Management is the only program of its kind in the United States;
  • The Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease focuses on research to improve understanding of biological processes and how malfunction of these processes results in various diseases. This research has significant potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms and specific molecules that control reproductive health and those that control the aging process as well as implications for the diagnosis and treatment of many of the most common diseases found around the world, including heart disease, neurological disease, infectious disease and cancer;
  • The College has numerous outreach programs to serve the community. These include a program that provides high school students from inner city schools who are interested in health professions with enrichment opportunities to help prepare them. Students in OT and PT participate in service learning at Eliza Bryant Village, Joseph’s Home, the Free Clinic, the Health Care Alliance, and other facilities;
  • The College has strong ties to the Cleveland Clinic, including three current collaborative educational programs (Ph.D. in Regulatory Biology, Ph.D. in Clinical/Bioanalytical Chemistry, M.S. in Physics—Medical Physics), and is exploring others in PT and OT.

Many of you have contributed to these successes through your hard work. And some of you have contributed financial resources that have helped make these achievements possible. I would be remiss, though, if I did not note the significant financial challenges that face us. We have achieved this growth and development with essentially no new resources from the State and have, in fact, experienced cuts in funding. Our faculty numbers have not kept pace with our student numbers, and we have many more students in need of scholarship support. I am delighted to be able to present you with so much good news, but hope that you will recognize that we need your help to sustain our forward momentum.

Best wishes for very happy holidays.

Bette Bonder

Dear alumna/alumnus:

The coming year promises to be exciting as President Ronald Berkman continues the forward momentum of Cleveland State University. Our enrollment is climbing to new heights (of the 750 new students this year, 338 are in the College of Science), the GPA of the entering class again exceeds 3.0, and our graduation rate is strong. Meanwhile, a new student center and residence halls are nearing completion. More and more, the state of Cleveland is coming to depend on Cleveland State.

Despite the abundance of good news, you know as well as I that we still face significant challenges.

In July of this year, right before the start of the school year, the State of Ohio sharply reduced scholarship support to students who need it most: those whose families have little to no ability to contribute to their education. In response, in one of his first acts as CSU’s sixth president, Dr. Berkman made the decision to hold freshmen “harmless.” The University covered their loss in scholarship aid so that these students would, in effect, be unharmed by the cuts.

It is in that spirit that the theme of this year’s Annual Alumni Appeal is the Access to Excellence Campaign. With the Alumni Association, we have set a $2 million goal, so not only are we helping our most needy students but ALL students who are in danger of abandoning their educational and career goals due to financial constraints.

We know that you can appreciate the challenges these students face. While the majority of our students work at least one part-time job, the struggle to complete an education on time and debt free gets harder each year. We’re doing our part to keep tuition down, but that means we, like virtually all great universities, must rely on donations from alumni and friends to make up the difference.

As a graduate, you are key to our success. Your gift will help fund existing scholarships as well as create new ones, making it possible for aspiring studentsto Access Excellence.

Please invest in our region’s future leaders by making your gift today. For additional information, contact Carol L. Carbary, CFRE, at (216) 875-9992 or email c.carbary@csuohio.edu.

Sincerely,

Bette Bonder, Ph.D., OTR/L
Dean


College of Science Enrollment

Cleveland State University Fall 2009 semester enrollment figures reached a 15-year high with a total student headcount of 16,418. This number represents a 4.2% increase over Fall 2008. According to Bette Bonder, Dean of the College of Science, of the 750 new students admitted into Cleveland State University for Fall 2009, 338 (45%) were in the College of Science.

This increase follows the enrollment trend for the College of Science. As outlined in the table below, the College of Science has experienced a steady increase in Fall Enrollment since 2004 for Bachelor’s degrees in Science as well as the Master’s and Doctoral program.

College of Science Enrollment Trends

Year

Bachelor’s

Master’s

Doctoral

Total

2004

1,383

446

93

1,922

2005

1,525

414

105

2,044

2006

1,564

448

106

2,118

2007

1,611

470

105

2,186

2008

1,685

523

144

2,352

2009

 

 

 

2,628

With the only programs in Northeast Ohio in physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assisting, the country's only Master's program in Diversity Management, as well as a wide variety of academic programs, the College of Science is committed to attracting talent through teaching, scholarship, and community service.


Upcoming Alumni Events

Prizes Can be Yours

Prizes can be yours when you participate in CSU Alumni Association activities! Just register for and attend one or more of the events and/or programs listed on the upcoming 2009-2010 calendar. Stay tuned for details.

1st prize: $400 value; certificate for a Continuing Education class of your choice

2nd Prize: $200 value; certificates to the CSU Bookstore

3rd Prize: $150 value; a CSU Viking Pride basket

4th Prize: $100 value; certificates to the CSU Bookstore

Reserve your seat now for all events at 216.687.2078 or email alumassoc@csuohio.edu. To view a calendar of upcoming events, click here.


First African-American PhD in Chemistry turns 80

Dr. George Walton Jackson, the 1st African American to receive a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Cleveland State University celebrated his 80th birthday in October.  We caught up with Dr. Jackson over coffee as he pulled up at Café Ah Roma in his Silver Toyota Prius with an Obama bumper sticker.  Dr Jackson is a successful Business Owner and Ordained Minister.  His wife Rose Marie Caple (Business ‘81) is a prominent Realtor.

Dr. Jackson graduated from High School at age 15.  By age 20 he had received his Bachelor’s Degree from Talladega College in Alabama.  When Dr. Jackson was in the Army there was a young man that talked about Cleveland as if it were paradise.  When Dr. Jackson got out of the service, he and his family headed to Cleveland.  Although he didn’t find paradise, he did find opportunity.   Dr. Jackson’s first job was working at Western Reserve University in the Medical School.  He wanted to pursue an advanced degree at that time, but Western Reserve would not allow Dr. Jackson to attend part-time, so he attended John Carroll University receiving his first Masters Degree there.  Focused on continuing his education, Dr. Jackson learned that the College of Science at Cleveland State University was starting a Ph.D. program in Chemistry, applied, and was accepted into the program.  CSU met both his need to work so that he could take care of his family and desire to pursue his dream of becoming a Ph.D. chemist.  Although there were no other African Americans at the Masters level or the Doctoral level at the time, that did not deter Dr. Jackson.  He was both single minded and enthusiastic about his desire and was able to succeed.  Dr. Jackson credits Dr. Karl Pearson (deceased), who was on his dissertation committee, for ensuring that he was thoroughly knowledgeable about his research.  Dr. Jackson recalls that he didn’t appreciate the challenge at first, but at a point realized that Dr. Pearson’s criticism allowed him to successfully defend his dissertation and create the foundation he needed to be an expert in his field.      

Dr. Jackson finished his Ph.D. while working for Union Carbide, one of the largest corporations in the world at that time.  Today, Union Carbide Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company.  Before Dr. Jackson retired in 1983, he had risen to the position of Manager of Technical Services, one position below Director.    

Role models for Dr. Jackson included his father, who, although he had a 5th grade education, instilled in him and his brother, who taught on the faculty of Albany State College for 31 years, the importance of education.   Dr. Jackson recalls hanging around while his father helped his older brother with his studies.  Dr. Jackson absorbed so much from his father and brother that he was in the first grade only two weeks before being placed in 3rd grade.  His father took the time to read with Dr. Jackson and his brother, and teach them “‘rithmetic”.  Dr. Jackson knew before he was 12 that he wanted to be a doctor or a scientist.

His second role model was Dr. George Washington Carver.  Dr. Jackson went to high school in Columbus, Georgia not far from Tuskegee.  He played high school football at the Tuskegee College stadium, and saw the reverence and respect for Dr. Carver.  Dr. George Washington Carver was an African American scientist whose studies and teaching revolutionized agriculture in the South.  Dr. Carver was an advocate of sustainable agriculture, and wanted poor farmers to grow alternative crops both as a source of their own food, and as a source of other products to improve their quality of life.   

As Dr. Jackson reflected on his time at the College of Science, he stated that Cleveland State University is “a very good school.”  He encourages students “to get involved with the culture of the University.”   He warns that the universe can distract you, so it is important to live your life with “zeal, enthusiasm, and passion” because “passion unlocks all the universe.  Those who have done things passionately have always achieved, and those who are nonchalant, don’t.  So we should all be very passionate about what we do and we will be successful.” 

Dr. George Walton Jackson is the President of Alpha-Omega Environmental Company and the founder and Spiritual Leader of the Agape Renaissance Center.  Current civic involvement includes Member of 100 Black Men.  Former civic involvement includes ten (10) years on the Institutional Review Board of the Cleveland Clinic, President of the American Sickle Cell Anemia Association, appointment by the U.S. Assistant Surgeon General to the U.S. Genetic Disease Committee, and the Urban League Board of Directors.  Dr. Jackson had five children with his first wife, Jeannette.


Inspiring Stories


Dale Luchetti DeLong, 46, newly divorced with three sons aged 13-20, recently moved to Cleveland to be closer to family. Prior to her divorce, she had been a full-time Mom and part-time personal trainer. She had earned a BS in Biology and Chemistry in 1984, but found it difficult to find a job at that time. Now her skills in that area are outdated. Dale realized she needed to return to school in order to support her family. With an interest in health and wellness, she decided to enter the Doctorate in Physical Therapy (DPT) program at Cleveland State University. She had to complete one year of pre-requisites before officially entering the three year intensive program. She is now in the third semester of the nine semester full-time program and carries a 4.0 grade point average. She is fortunate to have family who can help support her, butwhen she found out she had won the $750 Marilyn Wagner scholarship in Physical Therapy, she was happy and relieved to have her financial concerns reduced. Despite the challenges she faces, Dale says, "It's worth it to invest the time and money to back to school. The sacrifices go beyond tuition, but it will be worth it. I am pleased and impressed with the DPT program at CSU. It is a great commodity at a well-rounded institution."

CSU’s average student is a 28-year old single mom, just like Dale. Your support helps students like Dale by increasing existing scholarship funds and starting new ones.


New Book from Alumna

From Elizabeth Lansky (BGES ’93), aka author Lisa Black

“I wanted to let you know that the sequel to my book Takeover will be available soon.” This book is another in her successful series about Theresa MacLean. 


News You Can Use

BIOLOGY, GEOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES:

  • Dr. Girish Shukla received a $368,363 award from the National Science Foundation for his project “U12-Dependent Spliceosomal snRNAs”.
  • Dr. Barsanjit Mazumder has received an award from the American Heart Association (Great Rivers Affiliate) for funding of MAZUM06 for the project, "Extra Riboxomal Function of Riboxomal Protein L 13a in Translational Silencing and Monocyte Mediated Oxidation of LDL" in the amount of $21,000 bringing his total award to date to $42,000
  • Dr. Girish Shukla and Dr. Steve Slane will have a paper published in Cancer Cell International.
  • Dr. B. Michael Walton has officially received the NSF award of $272,075 for the ULTRA-ex project to be funded for 30 months starting on Sept. 15.
  • For more departmental information, click here.

CHEMISTRY:

  • Undergrad Saulius Gruzdys summer research results in Dr. Xue-Long Sun’s lab has been selected for the BioOhio 2009 Student Poster Competition during the BioOhio 2009 Annual Conference (Sept. 30 – Oct. 1). Only 20 posters from undergraduate and graduate students throughout Ohio are selected for free registration, free hotel, and three award competition.
  • Third year graduate student, Srinivas Chalagalla, won one of the best two poster presentation awards at the 2009 Midwest Carbohydrate and Glycobiology Symposium at the University of Cincinnati. The attendees are from Ohio State University, Michigan State University, University of Toledo, University of Indiana, University of West Virginia, University of Cincinnati and Cleveland State University.
  • Grad student Talal Sabbagh had a paper published in Talanta 78 , 910-915 2009. (Perera, N.I.; Sabbagh, T.; Boutros, J.A.; Bayachou, M.. “Reductive Decomposition of a Diazonium Intermediate by Dithiothreitol Affects the Determination of NOS Turnover Rates”).
  • Honors student Noufissa Zanati who graduated last semester had a paper published in the J. Therm. Anal. Cal. 96, 669-672, 2009.(Zanati, N.; Mathews, M.E.; Perera, I.N.; Moran, J.J.; Boutros, J.A.; Riga, A.T.; Bayachou, M. “Cholesterol levels and activity of membrane bound proteins: characterization by thermal and electrochemical methods”).
  • Dr. Xue-Long Sun (CHM) along with H. Zhang (Grad Student) and Y. Ma (Post-Doctoral Fellow) have been invited to contribute a book chapter on their recent paper on the chemically-selective surface glycol-fundtionalization of liposomes to the prestigious Methods in Molecular Biology Book Series: Bioconjugation Protocols, 2nd Ed.
  • Good news from the meeting (2009 Midwest Carbohydrate and Glycobiology Symposium) at University of Cincinnati during the weekend, Srinivas Chalagalla (a third year graduate student) got one of the best two Poster Presentation awards. The attendees are from Ohio State Univ., Michigan State Univ., Wayne State Univ., University of Toledo, University of Indiana, University of West Virginia, and University of Cincinnati.
  • The new B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences was approved.
  • For more departmental information, click here.

HEALTH SCIENCES:

  • DPT students Kyle Fleck, Miljan Cecez and Ashkan Jamili, along with part-time faculty members Anthony DiFilippo and Scott Euype, were active participants representing CSU at the Ohio Physical Therapy Association’s (OPTA) booth at the Ohio State Fair.
  • 2006 MSHS graduate Jill Cooksey was appointed Vice President of Nursing and Chief Nursing Officer for the EMH Regional Healthcare System.
  • Students benefit from hands-on scientific education where they gain the skills necessary for successful careers.
  • PT and OT programs expand service learning and pro bono work with such organizations as Friendly Inn, the Free Clinic, the Care Alliance, and the Women's Shelter.
  • MPT graduate Dawn Loring has received the 2009 OPTA Emerging Leader Award.
  • For more departmental information, click here.

MATHEMATICS:

  • Partha Srinivasan conducted a colloquium at CWRU focusing on structural biology using NMR solids.
  • Under the leadership of Professor Holcomb, who has won a prestigious national award for teaching from the American Statistical Association, the Department launched a new minor in statistics at the undergraduate level and also added a concentration in applied statistics at the graduate level.
  • Dr. Ivan Soprunov has been awarded a research grant in the amount of $14,938 from the National Security Agency for his project, “Sparse Polynomial Systems: Residues and Duality, Toric Codes, and Lattice Points in Polytopes.” Funding in MTH research is VERY hard to obtain. The proposal concerns coding theory and is based in part on the applicability, the crossover/interdisciplinary nature, of Ivan's theoretical work.
  • The Department would also like to develop possibilities for internships for our students. Each year, a number of our students hold internships at places such as NASA or one of the many financial companies based in this area. Math Majors are of interest to potential employers in a wide range of areas in Business, Industry, Government, and the Non-Profit sector. We would like to develop networks with these potential employers which would allow us, on an annual basis, proactively to place our students in suitable internships. In many cases, our own alumni are well-placed to help us with this. We would be interested to hear your thoughts on this idea, also, and would gladly accept all offers of help in this!  
  • The Department of Mathematics Math Club continues its lively weekly program. Two recent events held as part of Math Club's career series were: (Nov 3) A teacher from John Hay's Early College High School spoke on her experiences as a high school math teacher; (Nov 10) Two employees of Progressive Insurance discussed their experiences as an actuary and as a researcher in R&D at Progressive, and how mathematics plays an important role in their work. Math Club meetings cover a wide range of territory, including sessions on problem-solving and games, presentations by students and faculty, and prep sessions intended to help students present and compete in problem contests. Math Club meets every Tuesday from 3:00 to 3:50 in RT 1516. Check out their website at http://sites.google.com/site/csumathclub/Home for more information and a calendar of events.
  • The Department of Mathematics maintains a regular colloquium series, normally held Fridays. This semester, a highlight was a talk by Sean Chang (son of our very own CL Chang), who works at Dreamworks. Sean gave us a behind-the-scenes look at computer graphics as it is practiced in the industry, and demonstrated how what we see is fundamentally based on mathematical ideas of the sort undergraduates encounter (linear algebra, calculus, geometry). Sean revealed some secrets behind characters from Shrek and Halo, and previewed some yet-to-be released material. Our colloquia are often of general interest; whilst some are technical, others are quite accessible to students and non-specialists. Look out for announcements of forthcoming ones!
  • We would also like to develop possibilities for internships for our students. Each year, a number of our students hold internships at places such as NASA or one of the many financial companies based in this area. Math Majors are of interest to potential employers in a wide range of areas in Business, Industry, Government, and the Non-Profit sector. We would like to develop networks with these potential employers which would allow us, on an annual basis, proactively to place our students in suitable internships. In many cases, our own alumni are well-placed to help us with this. We would be interested to hear your thoughts on this idea, also, and would gladly accept all offers of help in this!  
  • For more departmental information, click here.

PHYSICS:

  • Kiril Streletzky is the recipient of the 2009 Jearl Walker Outstanding Teaching Award from the College of Science. The award recognizes his dedication to the profession and to his students who participate in his research activities.
  • Miron Kaufman chaired a session at an MIT symposium, where he also delivered a talk on defect phase transitions. He has co-authored a paper titled: “Extended Defects in the Potts-Percolation Model of a Solid: Renormalization Group and Monte Carlo Analysis” which was just published in the leading physics journal, the Physical Review.
  • Dr. Kiril A Streletzky was an invited speaker at the Macromolecular Science & Engineering Colloquium/Raymond F. Boyer Lecture Series at the Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University. He presented his research at the talk titled “Microgels above and below volume phase transition: structure, dynamics, and loading capacity” on Oct 16, 2009.
  • In December, Jearl Walker will publish Fundamentals of Physics, 9e, which is his sixth edition of the classic textbook that he used as a freshman at MIT. There are now well over one million copies of the book, world wide, with Cleveland State University credited on the title page.
  • Dr. Kiril A. Streletzky has recently published a paper in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds: A. N. Streletskii, D. G. Permenov, B. B. Bokhonov, I. V. Kolbanev, A. V. Leonov, I. V. Berestetskaya, K. A. Streletzky, “Destruction, amorphization and reactivity of nano-BN under ball milling”, J. Alloys and Compounds, 483, 313 (2009).
  • Four undergraduate students (physics majors): Ryan McDonough, Krista Freeman, Max Orseno, Prasenjit Bose presented their summer -09 research (done in Dr. Streletzky’s lab) at the Fall Meeting of the Ohio Section of the American Physical Society held at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, OH (Oct 9-10, 2009). The research of the fifth physics student Brian Vynhalik was presented at this conference by his advisor, Dr. Zurcher.
  • Ryan McDonough and Krista Freeman were among 6 undergraduate students statewide to win travel grant ($100 each) to the Fall Meeting of the Ohio Section of the American Physical Society held at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, OH (Oct 9-10, 2009). They were the main authors on the two papers that they presented at this conference. (Their research was completed in Dr. Streletzky’s lab).
  • Ryan McDonough’s poster “Drug Loading Capacity of Polymeric Microgels” won the Best Undergraduate Poster prize at the Graduate Student Interdisciplinary Research Club (GSIRC) Symposium held at CSU on Oct 17, 2009. The presented research was completed under the joint project between CSU’s Physics (Streletzky’s lab) and Chemistry (Bayachou’s lab) Departments.
  • Krista Freeman (Honors BS in Physics, 2011) attended the National Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics 2009 (WoPHY 2009) held at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln (Oct 31-Nov1, 2009). Her poster “A Spectroscopic Study of Protein Dynamics in Viscous Solvent” won the First Outstanding Poster Award, a significant achievement for a national conference. The research project presented by Krista is ongoing collaboration between Streletzky’s Lab (CSU) and Department of Polymer Science at the University of Akron. Krista also won a travel grant from the conference organizers to travel to this conference. Krista writes of her experience:

I attended the Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics 2009 (WoPHY 2009) held at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln from October 30th-November 1, 2009. I heard about the conference from Dr. Streletzky and decided to attend. I was given a travel grant, and all of the expenses during the conference were covered already, so I got to go there completely for free, which was a HUGE plus!

The conference consisted of speeches by successful women with careers in physics fields, invited talks by undergraduate students, and a poster session for all who attended. There were about 50 participants from all over the Midwest-- from as far as Puerto Rico and as close as Nebraska! While I was there I connected with many other women who are really similar to me! People with the same goals and dreams and ambitions, and who face the same challenges and doubts that I face. Sharing my dreams, stories, and (of course) a lot of laughs with all of the students and with women who have already become successful scientists was the most encouraging and motivational experience I've had yet in my career as a student physicist! One idea that really stuck with me was a quote given in a presentation: "Brilliant successes in science are first and foremost the result of hard work, effort, and study-- only second are they the result of genius."

On Sunday it was time to present my research in the poster session. My poster, entitled "A Spectroscopic Study of Protein Dynamics in Viscous Solvent," highlights my research from my summer REU at the University of Akron and my continued work on this project as a part of Dr. Streletzky's collaboration with Dr. Sokolov (now at the University of Tennessee). By the time of the poster session, I was filled with such energy and drive that it would have been difficult NOT to do a good job presenting! So I threw myself and all of my knowledge into communicating my research, and the hard work all paid off when I was awarded the first Outstanding Poster award. I'll tell you, I was BEAMING with pride when they announced my name and school-- I've never been happier for all the opportunities I have had in my time at CSU!

Overall it was an extremely rewarding experience, and came at a critical time in my studies when I really needed the boost. I have so much gratitude towards everyone in our department who has encouraged me along the way-- I wouldn't be here without you all!

  • In December, Jearl Walker will publish Fundamentals of Physics, 9e, which is his sixth edition of the classic textbook that he used as a freshman at MIT. There are now well over one million copies of the book, world wide, with Cleveland State University credited on the title page.
  • Physics faculty, staff and students: Kiril Streletzky, Miron Kaufman, Ted Wood, Jearl Walker, Tara Peppard, Prasenjit Bose, Olwen Conant, and Vincenzo La Salvia have taught the Flying Circus of Physics portion of the two-week Summer Honors Institute for gifted high school students.
  • Newly hired Physics faculty member, Andrew Resnick, Ph.D. (University of Alabama in Huntsville) came to Cleveland State University from the Case Western Reserve Medical School (Department of Physiology and Biophysics) and, prior to that, NASA Glenn Research Center. Dr. Resnick brings with him research funding from the NIH to study how epithelial cells sense and respond to mechanical forces, a project Dr Resnick is looking forward to introducing CSU students to and providing them with significant research experience.
  • Dr. Kiril A. Streletzky has recently published a paper in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds: A. N. Streletskii, D. G. Permenov, B. B. Bokhonov, I. V. Kolbanev, A. V. Leonov, I. V. Berestetskaya, K. A. Streletzky, “Destruction, amorphization and reactivity of nano-BN under ball milling”, J. Alloys and Compounds, 483, 313 (2009).
  • Ulrich Zurcher, Brian Vynhalek, physics major, and Miron Kaufman participate in research collaboration with Rebecca O’Dwyer and Richard Burgess (Cleveland Clinic, Epilepsy Center). To date this research resulted in two refereed posters at the 6th Annual BioOhio Student Poster Competition and at the Heart-Brain Summit in Chicago.
  • Four physics majors - Ryan McDonough, Krista Freeman, Max Orseno, Prasenjit Bose - presented their summer - 09 research (done in Dr. Streletzky’s lab) at the Fall Meeting of the Ohio Section of the American Physical Society held at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, OH.
  • For more departmental information, click here.

PSYCHOLOGY:

  • Dr. Ernest Park was nominated and approved for membership in the prestigious SESP (Society of Experimental Social Psychology). Prospective members are nominated by current members, and the nominations are then reviewed by the SESP Membership Committee. Under SESP bylaws, membership cannot grow by more than 5% per year.
  • Graduates of the School Psychology program have an overall pass rate of nearly 100% on licensure examinations.
  • For more departmental information, click here.

Diversity Management Conference

SAVE THE DATE!

Friday, May 13, 2010

The 3rd Annual Diversity Management Best Practices Conference.

Explore how to make your diversity investments pay off. Learn how the latest research and theory can be used to provide real-world solutions and creative approaches to diversity dilemmas.

This year's specialty tracks are Diversity Issues in Law and Diversity in Education. A career fair for Diversity professionals is also planned.

For more information, click here.


Holiday Wishes

All of us here in the College of Science wish you and your loved ones a safe and happy holiday season. Thank you for your continued support and commitment to Cleveland State University and the College of Science.


Giving Opportunities

As a state-subsidized public institution, Cleveland State University faces significant funding challenges. The College of Science is determined to provide the best possible education to our students. You can help by making a gift to your alma mater in support of scholarships, research, equipment, and more. For additional information, contact Carol L. Carbary, CFRE, Director, College Development and Alumni Relations, at (216) 875-9992 or c.carbary@csuohio.edu or click here to make your gift online.


We want to hear from you!

What have you been doing since graduation? Have you moved or changed jobs? Have you had a life change (marriage, baby, retirement, etc.) or celebrated any recent accomplishments? Stay in touch and let us know! We’d also like to hear what you would like to read about in future issues of this e-newsletter. To submit or update your information, email c.carbary@csuohio.edu or call (216) 875-9992.


Newsletter Archives

To read past issues of this newsletter, please click here.


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