Cleveland State University

Economic Development

Research Topics

Workforce Development

Hill, Edward W. and Jeremy Nowak, Nothing left to lose: Radical policy changes are required to uncover the competitive advantages of America's distressed cities, The Brookings Review Summer 2000): 23-26. ***
Portions of this article were reprinted as: Cities that have forgotten their regional economies: Strategies for America's distressed cities, Greater Philadelphia Regional Review, with Jeremy Nowak (Fall 2000): 8-11 and Wanted: A Camden exit strategy, Philadelphia Inquirer.

PREVIEW
When we first started work on this article, we called it "Cities Forgotten by Their Regional Economies." But as we reflected more on the competitive position of distressed central cities, we realized that the title was wrong. Cities have not been forgotten by their regional economies; rather, all too often, the opposite has happened. Distressed central cities have not, or perhaps cannot, react to changes in their current competitive positions within their regional economies.
The urban employment renaissance of the 1990s has been largely confined to a few large central cities, bypassing many others and avoiding scores of formerly industrial small to mid-sized central cities. Our challenge is to understand why distressed central cities such as Camden, New Jersey, or Detroit, Michigan?have had trouble adjusting to competitive realities and then to try to devise public policies that allow them to uncover their competitive advantages.


The Brookings Institution, Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy 1999 Brennan, John F. and Edward W. Hill, Where are the jobs? Cities, suburbs, and the competition for employment, November, 1999 Survey Series.

ABSTRACT
Declining crime statistics, falling unemployment rates, balanced municipal budgets, and resurgence in downtown living have cities across the country claiming that they are in the midst of a renaissance. Indeed, the economic boom of the mid-1990s has helped most cities stem the tide of decline, but new date reveal that it has not enabled them to beat their suburbs in the competition for new jobs. This paper looks at data from 92 metropolitan regions to determine where job growth is happening, and reveals which cities are losing their share of metropolitan area jobs, and which cities are outpacing their suburbs in job growth.


Hill, Edward W., Comeback Cleveland by the numbers: The economy, employment and Education. In David Sweet, David Beach, and Kathryn Wertheim Hexter (eds.) The new American city looks to its regional future (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1999): 77-100.

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W., John F. Brennan, and Harold L. Wolman, What is a central city in the United States? Applying a statistical technique for developing taxonomies, Urban Studies, 35(11) (November 1998): 1935-1969.*

ABSTRACT
None Available


Assessment of the Rising Tide Initiative of the Urban League of Greater Cleveland (Cleveland: The Urban Center, June 6, 1997).

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W. and Harold L. Wolman, City-suburban income disparities and metropolitan area employment: Can tightening labor markets reduce the gaps? Urban Affairs Review 32(4) (March 1997): 558-582.*

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W. and Harold L. Wolman, Accounting for the change in income disparities between U.S. central cities and their suburbs from 1980 to 1990, Urban Studies 34(1) (January 1997): 43-60.*

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W., Julie Rittenhouse and Rosalyn C. Allison, Recommendations to the Minority Economic Opportunity Center and the Greater Cleveland Urban League on Improving Training and Employment Prospects for the Hard-to-Employ in Greater Cleveland, Report 94-7 (Cleveland: The Urban Center, for the Greater Cleveland Urban League, April 1994).

ABSTRACT
None Available


Galster, George and Edward W. Hill, The Metropolis in Black and White: Place, power and polarization (New Brunswick, N.J.: Center for Urban Policy Research, 1992). Second printing in 1994.

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W., Increasing minority representation in the planning professorate, Journal of Planning Education and Research 9(2) (Winter 1990): 139-141. *

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W. and Heidi Marie Rock, Education as an economic development resource, Government and Policy (Environment and Planning C) 8(1) (February 1990): 53-68.*

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W., Changing Educational Objectives for a Changing National Economy: Employability and Skills Development in the Classroom, in Gary Sands (ed.) Educating Youth in a Changing Economy (Detroit: Center for Urban Studies, Wayne State University, 1989).

PREVIEW
Students, parents, employers and educators are grappling with the future. Politicians and academic researchers are quickly following their lead, sensing that a constituency is developing for their services. Is this a new phenomenon? No, it is another cycle of concern over the course of public education, a cycle which has been repeated many times over the past 100 years.[l]
Despite the great sound and fury of the current debate over public education, we have yet to see a clearly articulated set of questions. In fact, each special interest group appears to have its own. The business community -and the Reagan Administration -is harping on the perceived lack of quality of secondary education. Minority parents in many inner-city communities are concerned about violence, gang activity, and the real possibility of resegregation of urban schools. Parents, almost universally, are concerned about teenage pregnancy and chemical abuse. Advocates for the poor look to the schools as vehicles for feeding children and providing social services.


Hill, Edward W., Differences in the dependency rate among the states in 1985: Implications for development and labor market policy, Economic Development Quarterly (August 1988) 2(3):217 236.*

ABSTRACT
None Available


Hill, Edward W., What is the effect of random variation in state jobless rates? Monthly Labor Review 110(12) (December 1987): 41 46. *

ABSTRACT
None Available


Harrison, Bennett and Edward W. Hill, The changing structure of jobs in older and younger cities. In Benjamin Chinitz (ed.) Central city economic development (Cambridge, MA: Abt Books, 1979).

ABSTRACT
None Available


* article is peer reviewed
** article is reviewed by editorial board
*** article is invited

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Fax: 216.687.2013
e.hill@csuohio.edu


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