Cleveland State University Poetry Center

Mother Was a Tragic Girl by Sandra Simonds

Mother Was a Tragic Girl  by Sandra Simonds || $15.95

"What does it mean to be a used white wife, a mother, a tragic girl writing poems? Sandra Simonds gets into these messy words and then tears them apart. Sometimes with the words of others. And sometimes with poems made from scratch. They aren't all bad, these words. But they aren't all good either. And that is where MOTHER WAS A TRAGIC GIRL gets its power. You will at moments be laughing but then you will also at moments just as much be crying. If Antigone was alive and decided to write some poems about the nuclear family, she would write them like Sandra Simonds. These are tough" Juliana Spahr.


Barn Owl Review Interview with Sandra Simonds

The Volta Review

The Lit Pub Review

Huffington Post Review

Devil's Lake Interview

BOR Review

Congratulations to Sandra Simonds for making Coldfront Magazine's list of Top 40 Poetry Books of 2012!


Sandra Simonds is the author of Warsaw Bikini (Bloof Books, 2008), which was a finalist for the National Poetry Series. Her poems have been published in several journals including Poetry, The Believer, The Colorado Review, Fence, The Columbia Poetry Review, Barrow Street, New Orleans Review, Court Green, and Lana Turner: A Journal of Poetry and Opinion. She earned a PhD in Literature from Florida State University and lives in Tallahassee, Florida.


Skyhook

Today I lost my mucus plug which
is funny since I’m Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
and did not expect to get pregnant
to begin with. Here are some cool facts you should
probably know before you start sending
my soon-to-be-born son X-mas presents:
My real name is Geraldine Ferraro
and that is the name of the woman who
got me pregnant which means I got myself
pregnant. Get it? It all went down
at the Cleveland Clinic in Dayton, Alaska.
I’m also America’s first face
transplant and grew up in the town where Robert
Lowell’s poem “Skunk Hour” takes place.
Hell yeah, I’ve seen where that skunk stuck
her snout in sour cream, so steeped in idealism.
FYI, Edgar Allen Poe wrote an excellent
short story on a case of mistaken
identity where the ego creates
and projects itself onto the basketball
court which mirrors the political
arena where Ms. Ferraro spent most
of her formative years. But it’s Schelling’s
concept of “identity” illustrating
the interaction of the individual
with its counterpart, man and machine,
deus ex machina, father and son,
that keeps me going back to the game.


Mother Was a Tragic Girl
by Sandra Simonds

"What does it mean to be a used white wife, a mother, a tragic girl writing poems? Sandra Simonds gets into these messy words and then tears them apart. Sometimes with the words of others. And sometimes with poems made from scratch. They aren't all bad, these words. But they aren't all good either. And that is where Mother Was a Tragic Girl gets its power. You will at moments be laughing but then you will also at moments just as much be crying. If Antigone was alive and decided to write some poems about the nuclear family, she would write them like Sandra Simonds. These are tough" — Juliana Spahr

When I look out the window of my Winnebago I want to see a Sandra Simonds poem on the billboard before I crash. Bless her cranky pornboots. — Cathy Wagner