English Department

Graduate Courses

Non-Degree Students: In order to register for the courses listed below, non-degree graduate students must receive permission from the English Department. A signed course permission slip must be submitted with registration materials.Course permission slips may be downloaded.

ENG 506 Composition Theory (4-0-4). Advanced study in expository writing: writing processes, reading and writing, rhetoric, evaluation, and pedagogy. Offered fall semester. Required of beginning teaching assistants, except for those who took ENG 308 Composition Theory as undergraduates.

ENG 507 Workshop in Teaching (1-5-1). Relation of composition theory to the practice of tutoring and teaching. Required for teaching assistants, except for those who took ENG 309 Writing Center Practicum as undergraduates. Meets once a week during fall and spring semesters. May be taken S/F. ENG 507 credits do not count towards the 12 credits of electives in the degree requirements.

ENG 508 Writing Institute For Teachers (2-4 credits). Workshop and practicum in the teaching of writing, exploring current trends such as whole language approaches, writing across the curriculum, or writing about the arts. When offered in summer as SWIFT, this course is presented in collaboration with the Great Lakes Theater Festival.

ENG 509 Technical Writing (2-3 credits). Preparation of reports, scientific papers, and other genres of technical writing, with emphasis on audience, voice, the proper formatting of data, and the integration of text with graphic and visual material. When offered for three credits, the course includes a major writing project, as well as shorter assignments.

ENG 510 Literary Analysis (4-0-4). Introduction to literary analysis at the graduate level. Such analysis will combine close reading of literary texts with discussion of critical articles demonstrating a range of critical and theoretical approaches. Texts will represent a range of genres and literary periods. Usually offered fall semester.

ENG 511 Critical Approaches to Literature (4-0-4). Critical approaches to literature and the theories that underlie them, including formalist, reader response, deconstructionist, new historicist, feminist, and other post-structuralist approaches. Core course required for MA candidates in the literature concentration. Usually offered spring semester.

ENG 512 Craft of Literature (4-0-4). Study of a single literary genre (poetry, fiction, play-writing, or non-fiction) with an emphasis on theory and craft for the practitioner. Literary texts are used to demonstrate the formal range of the genre studied. Craft exercises are used to explicate the operations and assumptions underlying literary techniques. Required for MA candidates in the creative writing concentration; fulfills a “craft course” requirement for NEOMFA students.

ENG 513 Language of Literature (4-0-4). Literary discourse; topics center on the structure and form of literary expressiveness; option and choice; linguistic form as the expression of meaning. Counts as an introductory linguistics course in the TESOL endorsement program.

ENG 514 Studies in Linguistics (4-0-4). Topics include historical linguistics, history of the English language, grammar, sociolinguistics, or analysis of an uncommonly taught language such as Sanskrit or Armenian. May be repeated with change of topic. Courses count as TESOL endorsement electives. Note: when the topic is Modern English Grammar, ENG 514 counts as an introductory linguistics course in the TESOL endorsement program.

ENG 515 Studies in Rhetoric (4-0-4). Authors, themes, genres, or periods in the theory and practice of rhetoric. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 516 Style, Voice, and Persona (4-0-4). Experiments in the deliberate creation of authorial voice and persona through the manipulation of linguistic tools such as diction, syntax, and punctuation.

ENG 531 Studies in Medieval Literature (4-0-4). Topics include Arthurian tradition, women and writing in the Middle Ages, Chaucer, Malory, or courses in medieval genres or themes. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 532 Studies in Renaissance Literature (4-0-4). 16th- and 17th-century authors, genres, themes, or movements including humanism, the Reformation, metaphysical and cavalier poetry, scientific empiricism, and neo-classicism. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 533 Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements in 18th-century poetry, fiction, and drama. Topics include the Enlightenment, satire, rise of the novel, and neo-classical and pre-Romantic poetry. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 534 Studies in 19th-Century British Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements in 19th-century poetry, fiction, and drama. Possible topics include Romantic-era women writers, the literature of British imperialism, and the fiction of Jane Austen. May be taken up to three times with change of topic.

ENG 535 Studies in 20th-Century Literature (4-0-4). Modern and contemporary authors, genres, themes, or movements. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 545 Studies in American Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements of significance in American literature. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 547 Studies in African-American Literature (4-0-4). Authors, themes, or movements of significance in African-American literature. Topics include slave narratives, Harlem renaissance, literature of the 1950s, and African-American women authors. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 548 Studies in Multicultural Literature (4-0-4). Authors, genres, themes, or movements representing the ethnic diversity of modern American literature. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 553 Studies in Themes, Genres, or Individual Works of Literature (2-4 credits). Literary themes, genres, or works significant in British, American, European, or world literature. Topics in the past have included European Romanticism, the Faust theme, and Literature and Science. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 563 Gender Issues in Literature (4-0-4). Studies in gender theory and gender issues in literature. Topics may include contemporary feminist themes; the intersection of gender, race, and class; the relationship of gender to voice; technique and genre; and how questions of language are linked to these issues. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 575 Major Author (4-0-4). Intensive study of a single major author. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 580 Imagination Conference (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on manuscript submission. Intensive five-day summer workshop with visiting writers (fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction); “craft” analyses of creative writing. Students complete a workshop, and by the end of the semester revise a manuscript and write an essay about technical or craft elements. In addition to tuition, students are charged a workshop and materials fee. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 596 Independent Study (1-4 credits). Prerequisite: Prior written approval from Graduate Committee. Study of a topic not offered as a regular course, under the supervision of a graduate faculty member. The total of ENG 596 course work may not exceed eight credits.

ENG 602 Creative Writing (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Admission to the creative writing concentration or permission of instructor. Graduate-level work in the writing of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 610 MFA Fiction Workshop (3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of Instructor. Graduate-level work in fiction writing.

ENG 611 MFA Non-Fiction Workshop (3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of instructor. Graduate-level work in non-fiction writing.

ENG 612 MFA Playwriting Workshop (3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of instructor. Graduate-level work in playwriting.

ENG 613 MFA Poetry Workshop (3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of instructor. Graduate-level work in poetry writing.

ENG 614 MFA Special Topics Workshop (1-3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of instructor. Graduate-level work in genre-specific special topics writing. Topics may include recognizable sub-forms such as young adult fiction, detective fiction, memoir, research-based non-fiction, biography, experimental playwriting, dramatic docudrama, site-specific playwriting, puppetry playwriting or poetic forms. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 615 MFA Craft and Theory (3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of instructor. Genres of fiction, non-fiction, playwriting and poetry studied with an emphasis on the craft of the practitioner. Literary texts are used to demonstrate the formal range of the genres studies. Craft exercises are used to explicate the operations and assumptions underlying literary techniques, Core course for NEOMFA.

ENG 616 MFA Literature (1-3 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to NEOMFA Program or permission of instructor. Studies in literary themes, genres, or works significant in British, American, European or world literature.

ENG 690 MFA Internship (3 credits). Prerequisite: Permission of MFA Advisor and instructor. Eight to ten hour weekly practicum in literary magazine production and/or editing, arts administration, arts programming/outreach, arts instruction, dramaturgy or theatrical production. Aims to bring students to an understanding of professional demands and expectations. Instructor will monitor student progress through bi-weekly contact with site manager. Students will be responsible for attending four class sessions throughout the semester and for generating a substantial academic paper.

ENG 695 Graduate Seminar (4-0-4). Study of an important topic in literary or cultural history, criticism, or rhetoric, with special emphasis on methods of analysis and research. May be repeated with change of topic.

ENG 699 Thesis (1-4 credits, repeated for a minimum total of 5 credits). Writing of a Master’s Project under the direction of a faculty member. Required for all MA degree candidates.

For more information please visit the Graduate Handbook.

engaged learning
Mailing Address
Cleveland State University
College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences
Department of English
2121 Euclid Ave., RT 1815
Cleveland, OH 44115-2214
Campus Location
Rhodes Tower, Room 1815
1860 E. 22nd Street
Contact
Stephanie E. Nunley
s.nunley@csuohio.edu
Phone: 216.687.3951
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