Home

News

Features

Sports

Perspectives

Police Blotter


About Us

Stater Archives

School of Communication

The Cleveland Stater YouTube Channel Visit us at:

The Cleveland Stater Facebook Page The Cleveland Stater Twitter The Cleveland Stater YouTube Channel


 

December 5, 2013

Breaking ground on NEOMED site

By Jordan Gonzalez

Peabody’s and the old Rascal House building on Euclid and East 21st street was demolished on Dec. 4, and early stages of construction on the new health and science building will begin right after the demolition, according to Joseph Han, assistant vice president of facilities and safety at Cleveland State.

As soon as the asbestos inspection is finalized – something which Han said is a standard procedure – the demolition team will have the green light to tear down the iconic buildings. Demolition is expected to be finished within a day or two, and should be cleaned up by early January, just in time for the spring 2014 semester. Han said some road closures can be expected, like the currently restricted East 22nd, during the overall process.

Han said construction on the foundation will begin in February 2014, and by August that same year, construction on the exterior will begin. By June 2015 the building should be finished and moved into by faculty and staff.

Cleveland-based construction company Donley’s Inc. will be building the structure, Han said. Donley’s website said the building will be three-stories tall and will house simulation labs, classrooms, offices, public atriums and “various flexible research areas.”

Donley’s has been in Cleveland since its founding in 1895, and is an award-winning construction company that builds mainly academic and health structures throughout the U.S., especially in Cleveland.

Another major construction project is the renovation of the supports where East 22nd runs under the bridge between the Student Center and the Main Classroom. Han said this project, which fixing structural and aesthetic issues under the bridge (also under Rhodes Tower near the entrance to the library), will be finished by mid-January.

The newly-named Washkewicz College of Engineering (formerly Fenn College of Engineering) will also begin fresh renovations starting in 2014.

Han said he is very happy to see these new changes occur.
“This is an exciting time for the campus,” Han said. “We are putting our best foot forward.”