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0ct. 31, 2007




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School of Communication

Where's the pigskin?


By Matthew Wilder

Like me, many Clevelanders are diehard fans of our teams: the Cavs, the Indians and the Browns. In Cleveland, football is more than a sport; it’s practically a culture of its own. No matter what the Browns do, everyone is still all over football. We live, breathe, eat and sleep football. If the Browns aren’t putting on a show, we turn to the Buckeyes.
Let’s step back and look at the big picture of the college football scene. Baldwin Wallace, Akron, Bowling Green, Miami (Ohio), Ohio University, and Mount Union all have football teams. Why doesn’t CSU have one?
Sure, there would have to be more women’s sports on campus in order to form a football team. The number of women’s and men’s sports is supposed to be evenly balanced, according to National Collegiate Athletic Association rules.
With hope, the Athletic Department can do something about this. It seems a lot of people on campus are watching, waiting for the day of the big announcement in the campus newspapers, on Sportstime Ohio and ESPN, that CSU is starting a football program immediately.
This would not only excite the students, but the entire city. It may bring national attention, for that matter. If CSU officials are concerned about recruiting experienced players, there are students who played high school football and have experience under their belts.
Think about it. This would be a huge accomplishment for the university.
Brandon Garrett, a freshmen majoring in criminology, said, “We should have one.” Garrett said, “I’d want to play, even though I’m skinny.”
Myesha Watkins, a sophomore majoring in social work, said, “Maybe more people would come to CSU; most people go out of state for football.”
The reality of starting a franchise usually involves growing pains. It may take 20 or 30 years to become a successful team. However, this is something many students undoubtedly crave at CSU.
However, in 1969, CSU had a football club in which football fans got together to talk about their favorite sport. It was short-lived.

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