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September 26, 2013

Several roles left to play in CSU Gamers Guild

Weekly gamer gathering looks to add more players to membership

CSU Gaming Guild meeting

By Joshua Hoover

If students are looking for a group that will improve their social skills while providing entertainment, they need to look no farther than the Cleveland State University Gaming Guild.

The Gaming Guild is a club based around tabletop role-playing games like Dungeons and Dragons and long-form board games like Settlers of Catan, though the club also encourages card games and shorter board games. Essentially, anything that isn’t played on a television or computer screen with a controller falls under the wide umbrella of the Gaming Guild.

Club president Jonathan Herzberger explained that the gaming guild was formed as a way for Cleveland State students to find those with similar gaming interests as well as helping them find a place with enough room for them to sit down and play.

“We’re college students, and we know that it’s hard to find space to play a big board game in the dorms,” Herzberger explained. “It can also be tough to find a new group when you move away from your old one.”

The Gaming Guild is currently meeting on alternating Thursday evenings, where they play a game called Pathfinder, an offshoot of the popular Dungeons and Dragons series of role-playing games.

Herzberger said that they are hoping to expand, however, especially if they manage to get some new blood. In the past, the club has ran nights dedicated to board games, but did not have a large turn out, in part because of a lack of time from the club officers, two of which are graduate students.

“Gaming is the most reliable method I’ve found of meeting genuinely interesting people,” Herzberger said. “The social aspect of gaming is great.”

The biggest challenge that the club has faced is scheduling conflicts, according to vice president Sherry Goerz. She said that the club is looking to experiment with various online forms of role-playing as a way to get people involved who can’t be physically present at meetings.

The club is open to all students in good academic standing who are interested in hobby gaming. If you are interested in joining the Gaming Guild, or just attending a meeting, you can contact Herzberger, as well as other members, through the group Orgsync page.