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CSU programs evening events to curb underage drinking on campus

November 10, 2011

By Ashley Ammond

“Students need late-night events to attend or they will choose to leave campus for home, to drink, or choose a party off-campus,” Tasiana Stigall, chair of the new Student Involvement Council (SIC) said.

In the last one year, the number of those caught for underage drinking has increased. This was brought to the attention of Stigall, who is also the Residence Hall Association President, when the Cleveland State Judicial Board had to handle many of the cases coming from both Fenn Tower and Euclid Commons.

The main concern is students sometimes think drinking means fun, and SIC is taking its time to show students other ways of having fun that does not include breaking the law.
“We are focusing on all students who are 21, but we want freshman to understand you do not need alcoholic beverages to have fun.”

Another concern of SIC is students who do stay on campus don’t have many options to choose from. There aren’t many events on campus after the school day ends. CSU has only recently increased on campus accommodation for students with the construction of Euclid Commons. However, the school is still working on building a social world around it that would appeal to young freshmen.

“We understand college isn’t just about earning a degree, but also creating memories,” Stigall said. “We want students to create memories at their own campus, and have pride about the campus they attend, here at CSU.”

Though SIC’s main focus is underage students living on campus, they would really like to target the 25+ crowd. CSU is trying to move away from being the commuter campus that it has been and become more like a residential campus. Stigall believes with the right events, and student attendance, CSU can become more like the residential campus.

The goal in the following months is to get organization leaders to band together and begin to plan events for students. Stigall hopes to have high attendance at such events, and to keep students out of trouble.

“At Cleveland State University, we guarantee you will create a memory whether it is in the classroom or on the dance floor,” Stigall said.