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Law students successful in getting full-time jobs

BY KRISTEN MOTT

Oct. 27, 2011

More law school graduates from Cleveland-Marshall College of Law are employed in full-time jobs that require a JD than any other public university in Ohio. This recognition was found in a study published in Ohio Lawyer, an Ohio State Bar Association bi-monthly publication.

Of the 178 graduates from the CSU class of 2010, 149 graduates found employment nine months after graduation, according to the report.

Cleveland-Marshall is known for paying special attention to students, and providing them with support and advice for their future career in a legal profession.

“We work hard to help our students find employment after law school that requires their law degree,” said Craig Boise, dean of the law school. “And we are aided by a network of legal employers in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio who believe our graduates make excellent lawyers.”

The report also found that 67 percent of the graduates are employed in a job that requires a JD and are full time. This statistic is above the national average of 64 percent.
The percentage of graduates in private practice is more than 48 percent, which is also above the national average.

As for how the recognition will impact the school, Boise said, “In an economic environment where legal education continues to increase in cost and jobs are more scarce, I would hope that prospective students would find our combination of low tuition and higher employment to be attractive.”

The report looked at employment data from law schools at the University of Akron, University of Cincinnati, Cleveland State University, Ohio State University and the University of Toledo. The data was collected through a public records request sent out this past March that asked for employment and law school debt data for the classes of 2010 from each college.