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Emily Ouzts

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Nick Camino
Eduardo Otero
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ON THE FRONT PAGE

Board expected to raise tuition

BY EMILY OUZTS

Editor's Note: This story is about a pending decision and was published on July 23, one day before the official vote to freeze tuition this fall took place.

CSU officials will decide tomorrow whether to raise tuition this fall, this spring, or in both semesters.

The decision comes after Ohio legislature melted a statewide tuition freeze in its latest budget, giving public universities permission to raise tuition rates by 3.5 percent each coming year.

CSU will raise undergraduate, graduate, and law school tuition by that amount sometime in the next year. The board of trustees must approve the increase, which was first proposed by the university’s Financial Affairs, Audit and Facilities Committee at a July 17 meeting.

Jack Boyle, vice president for business affairs and finance, recommended the board approve a tuition hike for both fall 2009 and spring 2010 semesters, warning it would be the only way CSU could offset the $170 million cut in higher education funding leveled by the state.

The state mandates that the 3.5 percent increase can only be applied to the full academic year. If CSU waited until spring to raise tuition, it could only do so by 1.7 percent.

According to Boyle, that’s not enough to build the financial padding necessary to withstand the “extremely tight” budget restrictions facing CSU over the next three years, including a drop in federal stimulus dollars that could reduce university funding by almost 25 percent by 2012.

“There’s just no long-term solution for this,” Boyle said.

The tuition increase could also safeguard against what CSU President Ronald Berkman called a “very dramatic cut” to the Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) program, which provides financial aid for disadvantaged college students in Ohio.

The program will lose more than half of its funding in the next year, affecting up to 1,200 CSU students low-income families, or nearly 10 percent of the university’s total student body. Half of the revenue garnered from higher tuition rates in both semesters next year would go toward increased financial aid, Boyle said, which would help cover the loss of OCOG funding.

“There’s just too many students that will be touched by this if we don’t do anything,” Mike Droney, vice president for administration, told the committee as he recommended to raise tuition as soon as possible.

After the meeting, Berkman echoed Droney’s sentiment, saying that the university had to do what it could to help students at risk of OCOG cuts.

If the board approves a fall increase, CSU undergraduate tuition would rise by $276 for the 2010-2011 year. The figure drops to $138 if the board decides to wait until spring.

After first announcing that they would not do so this year, Kent State University and Youngstown State University have decided to raise tuition this fall. Ohio State University will keep tuition frozen for in-state undergraduate students.


ON THE FRONT PAGE

Enrollment numbers up for fall
BY NICK CAMINO

CSU and Cleveland Play House prepare to move to Allen Theatre
BY DANIEL CIKA
COM 225 REPORTER


NEWS

CSU acquires Heritage Suites, Prospect apartment complex
BY VINCE FRATIANI

Jehovah's Witnesses come to CSU
BY EMILY OUZTS

Restaurant and park to highlight changes on Euclid Avenue
BY VINCE FRATIANI

Archives offer glimpse into CSU history
BY EDUARDO OTERO

Local businesses fight through summer grind
BY NICK CAMINO

CSU police blotter

Communication program revised
BY EDUARDO OTERO


PERSPECTIVES

Stop denying tenure to qualified professors

Higher academic standards overdue at CSUBY NICK CAMINO

Ingenuity Fest provides unusual perspective on Greater Cleveland arts
BY EDUARDO OTERO


SPORTS

Expansion plan may include diving well
BY VINCE FRATIANI

Coach excited to begin CSU
BY NICK CAMINO

Vikings release 2009-10 schedule
BY NICK CAMINO