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MU 248
School of Communication
Cleveland State University
2001 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44115

PHONE
(216) 687-5094

FAX
(216) 687-5588

E-MAIL
cleveland.stater@csuohio.edu

ONLINE EDITOR
Emily Ouzts

STATER STAFF
Nick Camino
Eduardo Otero
Vince Fratiani
Jonathan D. Herzberger

ADVISOR
Betty Clapp
(216) 687-5093
b.clapp@csuohio.edu

The Innerlink: A CLASS Publication

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SPJ - Cleveland Chapter

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Editor and Publisher

Columbia Journalism Review

 


NEWS

Ingenuity Fest to offer artsy, innovative entertainment for all

BY JONATHAN D. HERZBERGER

To the left, a group of artists frantically attacks a sizeable canvas together. To the right, dancers in colorful makeup glide in unison to a group of drummers behind them. A man on bright silver stilts strolls past, and just ahead, a pair of lively robots dance with a group of equally lively children.

Either you ate something spicy before going to bed and are paying for it in your dreams, or you’re at the Ingenuity Festival.

Beginning in 2004 as “Ingenuity, the Cleveland Festival of Art + Technology,” co-founders Thomas Mulready of CoolCleveland.com and James Levin, playwright, director and founder of the Cleveland Public Theatre, envisioned a fusion of art and technology, a sprawling event with a scope rarely attempted in Cleveland.

Levin and Mulready sought to highlight something they called “the hidden Cleveland,” which Mulready defines as “addressing a pressing need of this region: that despite the rich history and presence of wonderful resources in culture and technology, these treasures did not receive commensurate attention and respect.”

The first festival took place at various locations throughout downtown Cleveland in summer 2005.

In 2007, the festival partnered with Cleveland State University, Playhouse Square and WVIZ/Ideastream, hosting the entire event in Playhouse Square between East 22nd Street and the Halle building.

This year’s festival kicks off with a preview party on Thursday night at the Sterling Building, 1255 Euclid Ave.

Tickets are $45, which include all-weekend passes not only to Ingenuity Fest, but its sister event, Screaming Tiki Comic-Con, which boasts appearances by actor/stuntman Ray Park, best known for his work as Darth Maul in the Star Wars series. Also appearing are Edward James Olmos, from the television series Battlestar Galactica, and numerous artists and writers from Marvel, DC, as well as other luminaries in the comics industry.

Ingenuity Fest is bringing its own share of star power. Self-proclaimed Videoartist KASUMI, coming fresh from an appearance at Carnegie Hall, will be blending film with a live performance by experimental noise band KEN REI.

The performance art group Beatrix*JAR will be performing at 8 p.m. on Friday and conducting a “Circuit-bending workshop” in the Family Village at 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, in which they work with the audience to make music from electronic toys such as Speak-N-Spells.

Attendees are encouraged to bring battery-powered electronics and toys.

Scientist Geoff Landis will be hosting NASA’s contribution, including lectures on the future of space travel, the science of Superman and an installation dubbed the Magical Mirage Machine, which Landis describes as “a floor-projected 3D/virtual-reality display.”

Landis and other scientists from the Glenn Research Center will be hoisting virtual models of moons, stars, rockets and other celestial bodies throughout the weekend.

CSU staff, students, and alumni are involved throughout the festival, from the ambient rock band If These Trees Could Talk to several members on the events’ board of directors, to a large portion of the volunteer staff. Admission is $15 for the full weekend, or $10 per day. Children ages 12 and under attend for free.

MORE NEWS

CSU Summer Stages hits the ground running
BY EMILY OUZTS

CSU dial-up discontinued
BY MICHAEL DOLAN COM 225 REPORTER

Corlett Building now scheduled for demolition
BY VINCE FRATIANI

CSU SkyCam back on Rhodes Tower after upgrades
BY VINCE FRATIANI

Corlett parking lot prep creates accessibility issues
BY MICHAEL DOLAN
COM 225 REPORTER

CSU police blotter
BY NICK CAMINO

Picnic on the plaza during summer school
BY NICOLE SZWAGULAK
COM 225 REPORTER


FEATURE

Looking back & moving forward

In appreciation of Michael Schwartz's vision and in anticipation of Ronald Berkman's plans

A SPECIAL FEATURE BY THE CLEVELAND STATER STAFF


ON THE FRONT PAGE

Fall RTA schedule unlikely to undergo drastic changes
BY EDUARDO OTERO

Schwartz proposes campus wage freeze
BY EMILY OUZTS

Financial setbacks threaten future of fraternity housing
BY LAUREN BULLARD
COM 225 REPORTER


PERSPECTIVES

Give Berkman a fair chance

Schwartz woke a sleeping giant

Journalist's mission: To present the facts, tell the truth
BY EMILY OUZTS


SPORTS

CSU wins lawsuit
BY NICK CAMINO

NBA teams pass on Cleveland State's Jackson
BY NICK CAMINO

Former hoops star begins NFL career
BY NICK CAMINO