Cleveland State University
The Art Gallery at Cleveland State University

A Thin Red Line

Gallery C

Work in Gallery C

October 23 – November 10, 2009
A Different World

Gallery talk with the artist:
October 23 at 6:00 pm

Featuring works by self-taught visual artist, poet, and writer Virginia Konchan.

November 13 – December 5, 2009
A Thin Red Line
Artist talk and reception:
November 13 at 11:30 am

With works by Nez Perce artist Rachel Allen in celebration of Native American Heritage Month. Curated by Jeanne Grosetti. Cosponsored by CSU’s Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

November 14 at 12:00 noon
Family print art workshop with Rachel Allen and Jeanne Grosetti.

In this exercise each participant will have a piece of printfoam to make their own images, marks, or symbols that represent them or their family.  Each participant will print a piece to take home and share with family.

The larger collaborative project will be a large piece of paper that can represent the community of families or individuals that participated in the workshop. On this paper we will print each participant’s printfoam to make a community piece.

November 13 – December 5, 2009
Artist talk and reception: November 13 at 11:30 am

With works by Nez Perce artist Rachel Allen in celebration of Native American Heritage Month

Curated by Jeanne Grosetti. Cosponsored by CSU’s Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

Artist Statement

I look back at the patriarchs in my family and see the struggles they have had because of their Nez Perce identity and how they have courageously stood for the rights of their people. Chief Joseph was known for trying to lead the tribe to Canada but finally had to surrender to the United States government in 1877 when they were less than 40 miles away from freedom. They were taken to a reservation in Oklahoma. Chief Joseph went to Washington, D.C. to meet with President Hayes and plead the case of his people. The Nez Perce were moved closer to their original home in 1885. My grandfather, Clifford Allen, has spoken in front of Congress concerning Indian affairs. My father has just finished his law degree that focused on Indian law. So I had to ask myself: what do I do? There are still injustices and problems between the United States government and Indian nations. There are still social inequalities; I have experienced them first hand. As an artist I share my personal experiences and history. I hope that by doing this I can cultivate understanding and acceptance between those who see the work and myself.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]